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Politics In Verse With Calvin Trillin

Dec 27, 2012
Calvin Trillin
AP Photo/Richard Drew

America's deadline poet Calvin Trillin presents this talk about the 2012 presidential election -- in verse. With wry humor, Trillin discusses politics, campaigns and poetry, including the frustrating difficulty of trying to rhyme words with presidential candidate names. He spoke at Seattle's Town Hall on December 10, 2012.

Interfaith Amigos
Flickr Photo/University of Denver

This time of year, Christmas lights add color to the night. Candles are lit to celebrate Hanukkah, "the festival of lights.” The world's major religions each use light to represent big ideas. The Interfaith Amigos join us to explain the religious meaning of light.

Sergio Dionisio / AP Photo

Novelist Zadie Smith’s most recent work, "NW," is named after the postal code for an impoverished neighborhood in London. It’s just been called one of the 10 best books of the year.

Zadie Smith talks with Ross Reynolds about "NW," the difference between pleasure and joy, and why it took her  a long time to appreciate Joni Mitchell.

A parasite worms its way into a host, hijacks its nervous system and begins to control their behavior. Sounds like T.V. or the movies, but scientists have long known that parasites can take over and manipulate invertebrate and some vertebrate hosts. We talk with Dr. Shelley Adamo of Dalhousie University about how parasites may be turning hosts into zombies.

Thomas Jefferson: Success, Power And Vision

Dec 13, 2012
Thomas Jefferson
Courtesy/Wikipedia

Jon Meacham's new biography of Thomas Jefferson paints the founding father as the most successful political leader of early America, and possibly all of US history. "Thomas Jefferson: The Art of Power" discusses Jefferson's passion for his nation in the country's fledgling years and reviews the man's genius and his faults.

Meacham spoke at Seattle's Town Hall on November 28, 2012.

Former People
courtesy of Farrar, Straus and Giroux.

In 1917, the glittering elite of Tzarist Russia were crushed, practically overnight, by the Communist revolution. What happened to the nearly two million people who lived at the top of Russian society? Douglas Smith, awarding-winning historian and author, joins us to talk about "Former People: The Final Days of the Russian Aristocracy."

How do we deal with uncertainty and chaos? Ross Reynolds sits down with Nassim Nicholas Taleb and explores the concept of "Antifragile" and what can be gained from disorder. 

Naomi Wolf On Sexuality And Creativity

Dec 4, 2012
Naomi Wolf
Courtesy Naomiwolf.com

Naomi Wolf, author of "The Beauty Myth," has written a cultural and scientific history of the intersection of sexuality and creativity. She joins us to talk about "Vagina: A New Biography."

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

So many good books, so little time. If you're searching for a book that would make a perfect holiday gift or just looking for your next great read, here are Nancy Pearl's favorite books of 2012.

Nancy Pearl's Favorite Books Of 2012

Dec 3, 2012
Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Book commentator extraordinaire Nancy Pearl joins us with her picks for the best books of the year. Grab a pen, jot these titles down and save yourself the time of looking for your next great read. Need a recommendation for a holiday gift book? Call us at 206.543.5869 with a genre and Nancy will send you in the right direction.

Nancy Pearl's list of her favorite books from 2012.

Seattle writer Domingo Martinez is the author of "The Boy Kings Of Texas," which was recently nominated for the National Book Award.  It’s about the cultural tensions he experienced growing up in the border town of Brownsville.  

KUOW's David Hyde talks to Martinez about growing up in a border town, his family, why he moved to Seattle, and why he stayed. 

The psychopath Hannibal Lecter in the movie "Silence of the Lambs" is ruthless.  But he’s also charming, persuasive and highly intelligent.  Cambridge psychology professor Kevin Dutton says when psychopaths don’t turn violent they can become very successful as CEOs, surgeons, or in other professions. His latest book is "The Wisdom Of Psychopaths."

“The apple never falls far from the tree,” the saying goes. But what happens when it does? Our guest today tells the stories of children whose identities are very different from their parents, such as dwarfs who are born to parents of average stature.  How do parents and children navigate these differences?  And what do these children have in common?

Anne Lamott
Flickr photo/James Hall

Prayer takes many forms. Some are ritual, others informal. For generations, religious parishioners have wondered if there is a right way to pray. Writer Anne Lamott ("Some Assembly Required," "Plan B," "Traveling Mercies") believes that prayer comes in three essential types: help, thanks and wow. She joins us to talk about how these simple prayers guide her life.

Does the business of medicine need more accountability? Dr. Marty Makary thinks so and discusses what needs to happen with Ross Reynolds.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Librarian Nancy Pearl gives Weekday listeners her recommendations for science-fiction titles (and a few fantasy novels, too). Here are Nancy's picks:

Nancy Pearl Recommends Science Fiction

Nov 5, 2012
Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Science fiction is literature that asks “what if?” What if time travel was possible? What if robots took over? What if climate change made Earth uninhabitable? Nancy Pearl joins us with recommendations for science-fiction titles (including  “Angelmaker” by Nick Harkaway) and a conversation about the genre. What sci-fi are you reading? Share your picks with us at 206.543.5869 or weekday@kuow.org.

A Mother And Son's Love Of Reading, And Each Other

Oct 29, 2012

Journalist Will Schwalbe worked for years in publishing, most recently as vice president and editor-in-chief of Hyperion Books. When his mother Mary Anne was diagnosed with terminal cancer, their relationship turned not to her illness, but their shared love of reading. His new book documents their conversations, the difficulty of sometimes not knowing what to say, and the power of reading to shape us. Will Schwalbe joins us to talk about "The End of Your Life Book Club."

AP Photo/Ron Edmonds

Scott McClellan was the White House Press Secretary from July 2003 to April 2006, the longest serving press secretary under George W. Bush. He left that post, disillusioned and frustrated, and went on to write a book about his experience. It’s called “What Happened: Inside the Bush White House and Washington’s Culture of Deception.”

(Image/Pantheon Books)

Cartoonist and illustrator Charles Burns is the creator of the much-lauded "Black Hole" series, the tale of a mysterious teenage plague that was named one of the "Top 100 English-Language Comics of the Century" by Comics Journal. His early work could be found in Art Spiegelman's "RAW" magazine and the SubPop fanzine. He has since gone on to illustrate for albums, magazines and Madison Avenue.

Chef Tom Douglas Talks "Sweetness In Seattle"

Oct 22, 2012
(Photo courtesy Tom Douglas)

Tom Douglas is the chef and restaurateur behind eleven Seattle restaurants including Etta's, Palace Kitchen and the Dahlia Bakery, where you'll find his breads, pastries and other sweet treats. Now he’s giving away his secrets in "The Dahlia Bakery Cookbook: Sweetness In Seattle." We talk to him about the art of making desserts and take your questions about baking delicious treats at home.

The two women behind the Seattle rock band Heart, Nancy and Ann Wilson, have a new biography out. It's written with the help of music biographer Charles R. Cross. It's called, "Kicking And Dreaming: A Story of Heart, Soul And Rock and Roll." Charles R. Cross joins us.

Why Have Kids?

Oct 17, 2012

Feminist author and blogger Jessica Valenti takes a critical look at motherhood in her new book, "Why Have Kids?" Valenti talks with David Hyde about the pros and cons of raising kids in the 21st century and listeners weigh in.

Don't Know Much About the American Presidents book cover
dontknowmuch.com/

The presidential debates are a major factor in this year’s race for the White House. When did the debates become such a big deal? 

Historian Kenneth Davis tells us the story of America’s presidential debates and talks about his new book, "Don’t Know Much About The American Presidents."

(Photo: Lara Hamilton)

Lara Hamilton was about to turn 40 when she realized she wanted to quit her job. She worried about losing a steady paycheck, but she really wanted to find work she loved. She found the courage to act from a surprising source: Julia Child. Lara tells KUOW's Jeannie Yandel how Julia helped her then, and now.

Other stories from KUOW Presents:

Presidential Popularity Contests With Robert Merry

Oct 11, 2012
Where They Stand
(Credit/Simon & Schuster)

Who was the best US president? The worst? Biographer Robert Merry plays "rate the presidents" based on popularity and historical judgment. Here are some hints: Abraham Lincoln's at the top and James Buchanan ranks as one of the country's biggest failures.

FOUND Magazine’s Davy Rothbart

Oct 3, 2012

FOUND Magazine creator and This American Life contributor Davy Rothbart joins us to talk about 10 years of FOUND and his new collection of essays, "My Heart Is An Idiot." Then, Marcie Sillman speaks with choreographer Amy O’Neal about her new solo performance at Velocity Dance Center.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Many of us pass along books we love to family and friends. If you could only pass along one book — one you truly love — which book would it be? Librarian Nancy Pearl gives Weekday her list of books that should be passed along to loved ones.

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