books

Flickr Photo/Jake Bouma (CC-BY-NC-ND)

 Marcie Sillman talks to book hugger Nancy Pearl about a "cozy" mystery to settle in with now that the rain has returned to Puget Sound. Her recommendation for the week is "Murder at the Brightwell," by Ashley Weaver.

Nicholas Carr's book "The Glass Cage"

Ross Reynolds talks to author Nicholas Carr about his new book "The Glass Cage: Automation And Us."

Ross Reynolds speaks with New Yorker reporter George Packer about his newest book, "The Unwinding: An Inner History of the United States."

It tells the story of growing inequality in America by looking at the lives of different people, like Oprah, Robert Rubin, a lobbyist, a community activist and a bio-fuel entrepreneur.

Marcie Sillman talks to New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof, author of the new book "A Path Appears: Transforming Lives, Creating Opportunity," about the power of giving back.

Flickr Photo/Macsoundhine (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman gets the week's reading list from beloved librarian Nancy Pearl, who in honor of back-to-school season recommends two academic satires: "Famous Writers I Have Known," by James Magnuson, and "Dear Committee Members," by Julie Schumacher.

Steven Pinker's book "The Sense of Style."

Ross Reynolds speaks with cognitive scientist Steven Pinker, who is both a fan and critic of writing style guides. He’s now written his own: “The Sense of Style: The Thinking Person’s Guide to Writing in the 21st Century!” He says many authors of style guides don’t understand the cognitive biases that lead to us write poorly.

Sean Davis' book "The Wax Bullet War."

When Sean Davis graduated from Oregon’s Sweet Home High School in 1991 he wanted to see the world. He considered joining the Peace Corps, but with no plans for college he wasn't eligible. Unhappy with his grocery store job, Davis finally did what he’d determined not to do: He joined the Army.

For eight years Davis served as an infantryman and military policeman. He traveled the world relatively unscathed and left the Army in 1999. Back home he pursued an interest in painting and tried art school for a year before dropping out. 

Marcie Sillman talks to local author Garth Stein about his latest novel "A Sudden Light." Set in a historic estate in Seattle, the novel follows the Riddell family's past and present.   

A Northwest writer is this year’s winner of a prestigious PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize. Spokane’s Shawn Vestal won the prize for debut fiction Monday night in New York.

Wikipedia Photo/Larry D. Moore

Ross Reynolds speaks with George Packer, reporter for The New Yorker perhaps best known for his 2005 book on the Iraq war, "The Assassins Gate." Packer talks about why the Iraqi army crumpled before ISIS and the dangers facing Iraqis who have aided the U.S. Despite their perilous situation, the U.S. government has been slow in issuing visas allowing them to come to the U.S.  

Helen Thorpe's "Soldier Girls"

Marcie Sillman talks books with stalwart librarian Nancy Pearl, who recommends "Soldier Girls," by Helen Thorpe. It's a look at three military women, why they served and what that service meant to them.

  Ross Reynolds speaks with novelist David Mitchell about what he says is the most important book he's done: a translation of a memoir by a young autistic Japanese boy. In the book, "The Reason I Jump," the boy explains the behaviors that may seem strange to outsiders. Mitchell himself has a child with autism. He talks about what he learned from doing the translation.

Wikipedia Photo/Mariusz Kubik

Ross Reynolds speaks with novelist David Mitchell. Paris Review describes his  books, which include "Cloud Atlas", "Black Swan Green" and the newly released "The Bone Clocks," as ambitious, formally complex, imaginatively powerful, and immaculately written. 

Mitchell talks about why he brings back characters in book after book, and how he finds the concentration to write such intricately designed narratives.

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle comic book artist Roberta Gregory during Banned Books Week about what it’s like to have her own work censored. 

Marcie Sillman talks with everyone's favorite librarian, Nancy Pearl, who has been inspired by current Middle East politics to read up on the culture and history of the region. She recommends "After We Kill You, We Will Welcome You Back As Honored Guests," by Ted Rall, and "My Promised Land," by Ari Shavit.

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