books

A man who identified himself as Missoula attorney Thomas Dove, right, elbows his way to the stage at a forum open to the public on May 6, accusing author Jon Krakauer, center, of lying and using confidential documents in his new book about rape in Missoul
Jacob Green via AP

David Hyde speaks with Eric Whitney, news director for Montana Public Radio, about author Jon Krakauer's visit to Missoula, Montana last night to face criticism of his new book, "Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town."

Ross Reynolds speaks with Bruce Barcott, author of "Weed the People: The Future of Legal Marijuana in America."

Barcott began working on the book as a self-described pot agnostic. He said his 16-year-old daughter found it hilarious that her square dad was writing a book about pot.

Barcott was concerned about how legal marijuana would affect his children. But after looking into it he said he's proud of Washington for taking the step to legalize it. He thinks the legalization effort will only grow in coming years.

Marcie Sillman gets Nancy Pearl's opinion on "Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic," by journalist Sam Quinones. The book talks about the new generation of heroin addicts: they're young, white, relatively well-off, and they buy their fix the same way they order a pizza.

Heroin drugs seized by the Counter Narcotics Police of Afghanistan.
Flickr Photo/UK Ministry of Defence

Marcie Sillman talks to journalist Sam Quinones about his book "Dreamland: The True Tale of America's Opiate Epidemic." 

China flag
Flickr Photo/Graig Nagy (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with James Bradley, author of "The China Mirage," about our perceptions of China.

Nancy Pearl
Flickr Photo/KCTS 9

Marcie Sillman speaks with book hugger Nancy Pearl about the young adult novel, "Greensleeves," by Eloise Jarvis McGraw. It's the first in a series of young adult books that she loves that will be republished as the "Book Crush Rediscovery" series. 

Flickr Photo/Joe Thorn (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with librarian Nancy Pearl about a book she recommends that combines armchair travel, historical fiction and a good mystery: "The Strangler Vine," by M.J. Carter.

An Orca performs at a SeaWorld location in 2008.
Flickr Photo/Jeff Kraus (CC-BY-NC-ND)

John Hargrove was an orca trainer for 14 years, mainly at SeaWorld. Shortly after quitting the company he gained attention for his part in the documentary "Blackfish." The film chronicles conditions at SeaWorld theme parks and the death of Dawn Brancheau, a SeaWorld trainer killed by an orca in 2010.

Author Sherman Alexie in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Marcie Sillman talks with author Sherman Alexie about his novel, "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian," and its place on the American Libraries Association list of most frequently banned and challenged books.

Marcie Sillman talks with librarian Nancy Pearl who has a reading recommendation for those who have exhausted all of John LeCarre's thriller novels: "All the Old Knives," by Olen Steinhauer. 

File Photo: Massachusetts Rep. Barney Frank at a USDA event in 2012.
Flickr Photo/USDAgov (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to former Massachusetts Congressman Barney Frank about his new memoir, "Frank." 

Patton Oswalt
Flickr Photo/Jason Carlin (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Patton Oswalt is an American writer, actor and comedian. You may have read one of his books, seen him on film or television, heard him as the voice of Remy in the movie "Ratatouille" or become one of his millions of followers on Twitter. The L.A. Times called him “the dean of nerd comics.”

On this episode of Speakers Forum, Oswalt reads from his new book "Silver Screen Fiend: Learning About Life from an Addiction to Film." He calls it “the dorkiest addiction memoir ever.” 

Seattle Arts and Lectures presented this event featuring Oswalt at Town Hall Seattle on Jan. 31. He was joined on stage by George Meyer, a producer and writer for The Simpsons. Thanks to Jennie Cecil Moore for this recording. 

Ivan Doig, the award-winning writer, most often wrote about his home state of Montana. He was 75 when he died on Thursday.
University of Washington Photo/Anil Kapahi

Award winning writer Ivan Doig died Thursday at his Seattle home. He was 75.

Doig was one of the most respected writers of the American West and often wrote about his native state of Montana.

He wrote 16 books, including the so-called McCaskill trilogy, three novels about a fictional Montana family covering the first 100 years of state history.

KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman speaks with book maven Nancy Pearl about Holly LeCraw's new book, "The Half Brother," which is based on a far-fetched premise that she is not sure really works. Pearl is challenging readers to pick up the book and send her their own conclusions by mailing record@kuow.org.

A member of the Teanaway wolf pack in western Washington state. The wolf was in recovery from tranquilizing drug when this photo was taken.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife

Washington state’s wolf population grew by 30 percent last year – a big success for the state's wolf recovery plan.

But rancher Len McIrvin of Diamond M Ranch doesn't see why state conservationists are patting themselves on the back. And he finds it baffling that people are so fond of wolves. To him, they’re bloodthirsty predators.

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