books

Dear Sugar Radio is a weekly podcast from member station WBUR. Hosts Steve Almond and Cheryl Strayed offer "radical empathy" and advice on everything from relationships and parenthood to dealing with drug problems or anxiety.

Today the Sugars talk parenting and mental health. In this letter, a new father who struggles with bipolar disorder wonders if his young daughter is in danger of adopting his "self-hating" feelings.


Dear Sugars,

Sebastian Junger speaks at TED Talks Live in November 2015 at Town Hall New York.
Flickr Photo/TED Conference (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/A7DoJU

News of soldiers who struggle on their return home from war is a constant in the United States. Author Sebastian Junger looked for an explanation for this cultural phenomenon, and may have found it in his research into Native American history. His new book is “Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging.”

Author Peggy Orenstein
Courtesy Photo/Michael Todd

Girls want to be hot.

They want to look good – not because they want to feel good, but because they’re thinking about how others are thinking about them.

Nicole Maines along with her twin brother Jonas and parents Kelly and Wayne.
Courtesy of Penguin Random House/Kelly Campbel

Bill Radke speaks with Amy Ellis Nutt about her book, "Becoming Nicole." Radke and Nutt discuss how the journey of transgender teen Nicole Maines has influenced the national conversation around transgender rights. 

Can comedy reform a swing hater?

Jun 14, 2016
Negin Farsad performs at TEDWomen2015, May 29, 2015.
Flickr Photo/TED Conference (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/sRrmMx

Bill Radke speaks with social justice comedian Negin Farsad about how she believes comedy can change people's negative views of Muslims and other minorities. Her new book is "How To Make White People Laugh." 

Jeannie Yandel speaks with writer Peggy Orenstein about her new book, "Girls and Sex: Navigating The Complicated New Landscape." Orenstein talked with 70 high-school and college-aged girls while researching the book and says she was shocked to hear what she called "garden-variety stories about coercion" from nearly all the girls.   

Poets Faiza Sultan and Lena Khalaf Tuffaha at the KUOW studio.
KUOW Photo/Amina Al-Sadi

Elizabeth Austen talks to Seattle poet Faiza Sultan and poet and translator Lena Khalaf Tuffaha about how Sultan uses her poetry to bridge cultures.


When you look up at a starry night sky, it may make you feel small and insignificant — but it's also beautiful and awe inspiring. That's the feeling author Virginia Heffernan thinks we should be getting when we behold the Internet.

"Google organizes all the world's information," Heffernan tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "There's no way that one small person in our small, fathom-long bodies, could imagine containing all that information."

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about Katie Roiphe's "The Violet Hour."

D
RoaldDahl.com/Courtesy

Do you know the difference between a Phizzwizzard and a Trogglehumper?

Can you tell your Snozzberries from your Snozzwangers?

Do you know what a Quogwinkle is?

If not, you might want to try looking up some of these words in a dictionary.

But chances are you won’t find them in any ordinary dictionary. You’ll need the "Oxford Roald Dahl Dictionary," which is being released later this year to celebrate the centenary of Dahl’s birth.

Soldiers place their hats on rack just inside the mess hall doors before eating breakfast in the controlled monitoring area at JBLM.
KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Sebastian Junger, author of the new book "TRIBE: On Homecoming and Belonging," about why soldiers long for war and what civilians are missing out on.

Journalist Sonia Shah at her 2013 TED talk in Edinburgh, Scotland.
Flickr Photo/Ted Conference (CC BY NC 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/eMH3af

In a 2006 study, 90 percent of epidemiologists predicted a pandemic would kill 165 million people sometime in the next two generations.

Research published this year confirms that threat, and suggests the impacts would be greater than those caused by world war or financial crises. The study concluded that “leaders at all levels have not been giving these threats anything close to the priority they demand.”

Marcie Sillman talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about the novel "Imagine Me Gone" by Adam Haslett.

Author Lindy West lives in Seattle.
Photo by Jenny Jimenez / http://photojj.com

Jeannie Yandel talks to Seattle writer Lindy West about her new book, "Shrill: Notes From A Loud Woman." In it West talks about how she found her voice, reclaimed the word "fat" and began fighting misogyny on the internet. 

Sherman Alexie's new children's book stars Thunder Boy Smith, a little boy who was named after his dad. "People call him Big Thunder," the boy says of his father. "That nickname is a storm filling up the sky. People call me Little Thunder. That nickname makes me sound like a burp or a fart." Over the course of Thunder Boy Jr., the boy emerges from his dad's shadow to become his own person.

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