books

book love read Nancy Pearl
Flickr Photo/jamarmstrong (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with book hugger Nancy Pearl about the librarian's reading pick of the week: Seth Greenland's novel, "I Regret Everything: A Love Story." Pearl says when it comes to relationship tales, this book is the real deal. 

Flickr Photo/Joe Thorn (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman gets the week's reading recommendations from beloved librarian, Nancy Pearl, who suggests Priyar Parmar's, "Vanessa and Her Sister." The historical novel provides insight into the novelist Virginia Woolf and her sister, Vanessa Bell.

book read Nancy Pearl
Flickr Photo/Jonathan Cohen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman gets this week's reading recommendation from everyone's favorite librarian, Nancy Pearl. She suggests the latest police procedural from Richard Price (under the pen name Harry Brandt), "The Whites."

Dave Wenning

Marcie Sillman speaks with Washington state poet laureate Elizabeth Austen. Over this past year she has visited  24 counties throughout the state teaching writing workshops, giving readings and meeting fellow poets. Austen speaks about her first year as an "ambassador for poetry" and what she plans to do for her second and final year on the job.

parent kid holding hands
Flickr Photo/Jonathan Cohen (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with book hugger Nancy Pearl about the reading pick of the week: "If I Fall, If I Die." It is the first novel of British Columbia writer Michael Christie about on-the-job training for one parent-child relationship. 

Flickr Photo/Gexydaf (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Nancy Pearl about the beloved librarian's weekly reading recommendation: a science-fiction novel by Felix Gilman, "The Revolutions."

Joyce Carol Oates at Eastern Washington University's Get Lit! festival in 2013.
Flickr Photo/Spokane Focus (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds interviews author Joyce Carol Oates about her latest novel, "The Sacrifice." It’s a fictionalized account based off the 1987 episode of Tawana Brawley, who falsely accused six men of rape. 

Port of Seattle, port, stadium, Century Link
Flickr Photo/ArtBrom (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with KUOW reporter Carolyn Adolph to get the latest upates on the labor dispute that shut down Seattle ports over the weekend.

Also, Ross Reynolds interviews John Ahlquist, co-author of the book, "In the Interest of Others: Organizations and Social Activism,” which looks at the history of the longshoremen and the union's involvement in politics. Ahlquist is a professor of political science at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

Harper Lee, author of To Kill a Mockingbird, around 1962. The sequel to her book is due out in July.
Wikimedia Commons

Harper Lee’s second book will be out in July – will librarian Nancy Pearl grab the first available copy?

“You know, I don’t want to be disappointed,” Pearl said when we asked her on Tuesday. “I will definitely hold it in my hands and start reading it. But there’s always a chance that maybe there was a reason it wasn’t published.”

Gail Godwin's new book, 'Publishing,' is an inside look at the industry.
David Hermon

Gail Godwin is best known as an award-winning novelist, but Nancy Pearl told KUOW's Marcie Sillman that with her new book, Godwin explores her relationship with the publishing industry. The book is called "Publishing."

As second novels go, this one should prove a doozy. More than five decades after Harper Lee published her first — and, so far, only — novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, Lee's publisher has announced that she plans to release a new one. The book, currently titled Go Set a Watchman, will be published July 14.

Author Sharma Shields with her new novel, "The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac."
Screenshot from YouTube

Jeannie Yandel talks with author Sharma Shields about her latest novel, "The Sasquatch Hunter's Almanac," and what monsters represent for her as a writer and a parent. 

What if you could drink the elixir of life — sip from a magical spring that would make you live forever? Would you do it? That's the question at the heart of Natalie Babbitt's Tuck Everlasting, a celebrated book for young readers that's marking its 40th anniversary this year.

In the book, 10-year-old Winnie Foster stumbles upon a secret spring and the family the spring has given eternal life to. The father, Angus Tuck, takes Winnie out in a rowboat to explain how unnatural it is to live forever; how the great wheel of life has to turn:

Author Wes Moore takes questions at an event with the American Library Association in January 2014.
Flickr Photo/ALA (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Troubled youth to Rhodes Scholar.

U.S. Army paratrooper to White House fellow.

Wall Street banker to author and television host.

That’s a brief synopsis of the life path of Wes Moore, so far. He came to fame in 2010 when his first book “The Other Wes Moore: One Name, Two Fates” became a New York Times best seller. 

Ross Reynolds talks with actor and writer Bob Odenkirk, who you may know from Breaking Bad,  about his new collection of essays, "A Load Of Hooey."

This story originally aired October 24, 2014.

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