books

Dr. Deborah Cohen's book, “A Big Fat Crisis."

Ross Reynolds talks with Dr. Deborah Cohen about her new book, “A Big Fat Crisis: The Hidden Forces Behind The Obesity Epidemic – And How We Can End It."

She says there are two reasons for the obesity epidemic. First, we’re hardwired to eat and no matter how many diets we try, we can’t overcome the limits of self control. Second, in the modern food environment, corporations aggressively market cheap, unhealthy food.

Flickr Photo/samaja

One of the most popular characters in literature, stage, film and television started with a struggling doctor trying to put food on the table.

In 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, selling stories to magazines and papers as a side profession, introduced a detective and doctor duo in “The Mystery of Uncle Jeremy’s Household” – a prototype that would later become the ubiquitous Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson in “A Study in Scarlet” and an entire canon that followed.

Max Brooks' book "The Zombie Survival Guide."

David Hyde talks with writer Max Brooks about how to survive a zombie apocalypse and about his book, "The Zombie Survival Guide."

This interview originally aired on Jan. 20, 2012.

Nancy Pearl
Flickr Photo/KCTS 9

Marcie Sillman hears some great book recommendations from librarian Nancy Pearl. This week's list includes "In The Last Analysis" by Amanda Cross and "The Summer House: A Trilogy" by Alice Thomas Ellis.

Dave Isay's book "Ties That Bind."

Ten years ago, Dave Isay began StoryCorps by building a soundproof booth in Grand Central Terminal. People arrived in pairs to interview each other about their lives.

Today, StoryCorps airs stories weekly on NPR, and more than 30,000 interviews have been recorded and archived in the Library of Congress. Isay has also compiled some of the stories into books. His most recent is called “Ties That Bind: Stories of Love & Gratitude from the First Ten Years of StoryCorps.”

He spoke at the Elliott Bay Book Company on December 17, 2013.

KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Ross Reynolds talks with author Joseph Cirincione about his latest book “Nuclear Nightmares: Securing the World Before It Is Too Late.” 

Sustainability Guru Talks Local Eating

Jan 13, 2014
Vicki Robin's book "Blessing the Hand That Feeds Us"

Ross Reynolds talks with Vicki Robin about her latest book, "Blessing the Hand That Feeds Us: What Eating Closer to Home Can Teach Us About Food, Community, and Our Place on Earth.”  In it, she writes about an experiment she did in 2010 to eat only locally-sourced food within 10 miles of her Whidbey Island home. She is a local leader in the sustainable living movement and one of the founders of Sustainable Seattle.

Flickr Photo/brewbooks

Online retail juggernaut Amazon ruffled a few feathers on the University of Washington campus last week by setting up a booth to promote its Amazon Student program – just 20 feet away from the University Book Store’s outpost in the Husky Union Building.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ross Reynolds interviews author Gary Shteyngart about his new memoir: a story of growing up in the Soviet Union, moving to the US as a child and becoming a novelist. It’s called “Little Failure.”

In 2005, Rosemary Mahoney was assigned to write a magazine profile of the woman who started Tibet's first school for the blind, Braille Without Borders.

Sabriya Tenberken, who is blind herself, traveled to Tibet as a young woman and found that blind children there had no access to education, which motivated her to set up a program. During college in Germany, where she grew up, Tenberken also developed the first Braille script for the Tibetan language.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Nancy Pearl is looking forward to reading at least three books coming out in 2014. Of course, this is only the start of her 2014 reading list. 

In fiction, the popular Jo Walton has another science fiction novel, “My Real Children.” In non-fiction, “Hotel Florida: Truth, Love, and Death in the Spanish Civil War,” by Amanda Vaill and “Flappers: Six Women Of A Dangerous Generation,” by Judith Mackrell. 

In 1963, one of the most controversial books of the twentieth century was published. “Eichmann in Jerusalem” presented Adolf Eichmann not as a sociopath — but as an ordinary person who simply believed his actions were normal. The author of this book, political theorist Hannah Arendt, refers to this theory as the “banality of evil.” Arendt was a Jew who fled Germany in the early 1930s. 

Yale professor Seyla Benhabib offers an overview of the controversy surrounding Arendt’s book, and what lessons it can teach us about humanity. Benhabib spoke at the University of Washington’s Kane Hall on October 24, 2013 as part of the Graduate School lecture series.

Flickr Photo/Frank Fujimoto

When Seattle Public Library lifted its ban on guns in early November, officials there said they had done so because patrons had complained.  

Internal library emails reveal that there was just one patron complaint in several years – a man with a Yahoo email account who didn’t identify himself as either a patron or Seattle resident.

More than 40 years ago, on the evening of March 8, 1971, a group of burglars carried out an audacious plan. They pried open the door of an FBI office in Pennsylvania and stole files about the bureau's surveillance of anti-war groups and civil rights organizations.

Hundreds of agents tried to identify the culprits, but the crime went unsolved. Until now.

Flickr Photo/German Poo-Caamano (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher sits down once again with Nancy Pearl to discuss three books from 2013 that she recommends before they get lost amidst the new books of the new year; including a modern allegory “The Brothers: John Foster Dulles, Allen Dulles, and Their Secret World War”  by Stephen Kinzer, and Laurie R. King’s mysteries “A Grave Talent” and “To Play The Fool."

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