books

Book Ban
8:32 am
Tue February 4, 2014

Oregon School District Considers Ban On Sherman Alexie Novel

File photo of "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian." An Oregon school district is considering whether to pull the book.
Kraemer Family Library Flickr

Originally published on Mon February 3, 2014 4:05 pm

A school district in Sweet Home, Ore., is considering whether to pull a book by Northwest author Sherman Alexie from junior high classrooms.

Read more
Health
4:06 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

Diseases That 'Spill' From Animals To Humans

David Quammen's book "Spillover."

Steve Scher talks with author David Quammen about his book "Spillover: Animal Infections and the Next Human Pandemic."

Book Interview
3:58 pm
Mon February 3, 2014

A Biography Of The Prophet Muhammad

Lesley Hazelton's book "The First Muslim."

Steve Scher sits down with writer Leslie Hazelton to talk about her book, "The First Muslim: The Story of Muhammad."

This interview originally aired on January 24, 2013.

Author Interview
6:00 am
Mon February 3, 2014

Armistead Maupin Turns The Final Page On 'Tales Of The City' Series

Armistead Maupin reading from one of his "Tales of the City" novels.
Credit Flickr Photo/Chris Boland

You don't have to know much about San Francisco to be a fan of Armistead Maupin's long-running series, "Tales of the City." Maupin first created his quirky "family" of friends for the San Francisco Chronicle in the mid-1970s.

Read more
Nancy Pearl
11:34 am
Fri January 31, 2014

Relationship Between Writers And Alcohol

Librarian Nancy Pearl shares her latest book recommendations.
KUOW Photo

Steve Scher talks with Nancy Pearl about two books that explores the relationship between writers and alcohol.

"The Trip To Echo Spring: On Writers and Drinking" by Olivia Laing explores the role that alcohol played in the lives of six great American male writers: F. Scott Fitzgerald, Ernest Hemingway, Tennessee Williams, John Berryman, John Cheever and Raymond Carver.

She also recommends an older book, "Drinking, A Love Story" by Caroline Knapp, which helps a reader understand addiction.

Author Interview
4:05 pm
Thu January 30, 2014

Novelist Richard Powers Explores Post-9/11 Paranoia

Richard Powers' book, "Orfeo."

Ross Reynolds speaks with novelist Richard Powers about his new book "Orfeo." It's a story of a 70-year-old retired music teacher who finds himself being pursued by the Department of Homeland Security as the "Biohacker Bach."

Read more
International Security
10:08 am
Thu January 30, 2014

Nuclear Weapons Today With Joseph Cirincione

Joseph Cirincione is the president of Ploughshares Foundation, a global security foundation.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

The Cold War might be over, but the nuclear weapons and the threat of destruction remains.

Joseph Cirincione is the president of Ploughshares Fund, a global security foundation. He’s also the author of “Nuclear Nightmares: Securing the World Before It Is Too Late.”

He spoke at Town Hall on January 14 about today’s most pressing international security issue — and the steps governments are taking to make the world safer.

Author Interview
1:27 pm
Tue January 28, 2014

Exploring Relationships Through Time And Space

Author Ruth Ozeki in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Steve Scher talks with author Ruth Ozeki about her latest novel, "A Tale For The Time Being."

Author Interview
3:19 pm
Mon January 27, 2014

How Politicians Use Racial Coding To Win Elections

Ian Haney Lopez's book "Dog Whistle Politics."

David Hyde talks to University of California, Berkeley, professor Ian Haney Lopez about his book "Dog Whistle Politics: How Coded Racial Appeals Have Reinvented Racism and Wrecked the Middle Class."

Read more
Author Interview
3:46 pm
Fri January 24, 2014

Why Do You Read?

Wendy Lesser's book "Why I Read."

Ross Reynolds speaks with author Wendy Lesser bout her latest book “Why I Read: The Serious Pleasure of Books." Lesser is the founder and editor of the literary magazine the Three Penny Review and the author of eight books of non-fiction and a novel.

Adolescent Psychology
9:22 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Inside The Teenage Brain With Daniel Siegel

Daniel Siegel's book "Brainstorm."

The teenage brain can be a mystery to adults. UCLA psychiatry professor Daniel Siegel debunks myths about adolescence to show how teens learn new skills, connect with others and demonstrate limitless creativity.

Siegel is the author of “Brainstorm: The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain.”

He spoke at Town Hall on December 13, 2013, in a lecture presented by ParentMap.

Author Interview
3:20 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Badluck Way: From Seattle City Slicker To Montana Cowboy

Bryce Andrews' book "Badluck Way."

Marcie Sillman talks with Bryce Andrews about his new memoir "Badluck Way: A Year on the Ragged Edge of the West." It's the story of how a Seattle-raised liberal became a Montana rancher and the ethical and cultural transformations he had to make.

Poetry
7:26 am
Thu January 23, 2014

Remembering William Stafford, A 'Poet Of Personal Integrity'

William Stafford's collection "Ask Me."

This year marks the centennial of the birth of William Stafford, a much beloved poet and lifelong pacifist who taught at Lewis and Clark College in Portland for nearly 40 years. To celebrate the occasion, Graywolf Press has released a collection of his poems titled, "Ask Me: 100 Essential Poems."

Read more
Author Interview
7:12 am
Thu January 23, 2014

How Limitations Of Self Control And Corporate Marketing Set Us Up For Obesity Epidemic

Dr. Deborah Cohen's book, “A Big Fat Crisis."

Ross Reynolds talks with Dr. Deborah Cohen about her new book, “A Big Fat Crisis: The Hidden Forces Behind The Obesity Epidemic – And How We Can End It."

She says there are two reasons for the obesity epidemic. First, we’re hardwired to eat and no matter how many diets we try, we can’t overcome the limits of self control. Second, in the modern food environment, corporations aggressively market cheap, unhealthy food.

Arts And Literature
1:54 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Why Sherlock Holmes Keeps Coming Back

Sherlock Holmes, has been immortalized in a number of ways, including this statue at the Baker Street Station for the London Underground.
Credit Flickr Photo/samaja

One of the most popular characters in literature, stage, film and television started with a struggling doctor trying to put food on the table.

In 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, selling stories to magazines and papers as a side profession, introduced a detective and doctor duo in “The Mystery of Uncle Jeremy’s Household” – a prototype that would later become the ubiquitous Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson in “A Study in Scarlet” and an entire canon that followed.

Read more

Pages