books

Memoir
11:09 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Abduction And Escape In Somalia With Amanda Lindhout

Amanda Lindhout's memoir "A House in the Sky."

As a child, Amanda Lindhout dreamed about the exotic places she saw in National Geographic.

In her twenties, she traveled all over the world — usually alone, always on a shoestring budget with just a backpack. She trekked through more than 50 countries, and in 2008 she traveled to Mogadishu, Somalia, as a freelance journalist where she was abducted. For 15 months, she survived abuse by imagining herself elsewhere. 

After her release, Lindhout founded the Global Enrichment Foundation, a humanitarian organization dedicated to empowering women in developing countries.

Lindhout spoke about her recent memoir “A House in the Sky,” along with her co-author Sara Corbett at Town Hall on September 16.

Books
12:17 am
Thu October 24, 2013

Pen Pal Of Young 'Jerry' Salinger May Have Been First To Meet Holden

J.D. Salinger wrote nine letters and postcards to aspiring Canadian writer Marjorie Sheard.
Graham Haber The Morgan Library & Museum

Originally published on Fri October 25, 2013 6:47 am

Fans of the reclusive J.D. Salinger are in their element these days.

Read more
Cultural Identity
12:08 pm
Tue October 22, 2013

Love And Politics: The Public Passions Of Writer Junot Diaz

Writer Junot Diaz.
Flickr Photo/The American Library Association

Junot Diaz is a public intellectual who writes about love, sex, community and culture. The Pulitzer Prize-winner and MacArthur Genius talks with Steve Scher about the story of the government shutdown and the emerging Latino identity in America.

Read more
Population Impact
5:00 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

How Many Humans Can The Earth Sustain?

Alan Weisman's book "Countdown."

There are 7 billion people on this planet today needing water, food and shelter. There will be another billion in 12 years. How many humans can the earth sustain? Steve Scher talks with Alan Weisman about strategies to ease the human impact on earth. Weisman has written “Countdown: Our Last, Best Hope For A Future On Earth.”

Read more
Science
4:57 pm
Mon October 21, 2013

How Our Choices May Be A Question Of DNA

Douglas T. Kenrick and Vladas Griskevicius' book "The Rational Animal."

The classic observer of human behavior would tell you all of our decisions have a rational basis. But new research indicates that “rational” may not be based on any conscious factors, but instead, is more deeply hardwired in our DNA. Vladas Griskevicius is co author of a new book called “The Rational Animal: How Evolution Made Us Smarter Than We Think.” He talks with Marcie Sillman.

Read more
Book Guru
2:30 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

Nancy Pearl's Fall Reading Recommendations

Ben Winters' book "Countdown City," and Joan Silber's book "Fools."

Nancy Pearl talked with KUOW's Steve Scher and recommended two of her favorite recent reads: Countdown City by Ben Winters, and Fools by Joan Silber.

Read more
Poetry Reading
9:00 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Jennifer Maier On Constructing A "Responsible Person"

Poet Jennifer Maier
Credit Keith Brofsky

In Jennifer Maier's poem, "Responsible Person," a young boy practices constructing a self by building a paper version of the man he hopes to be in the future.

His father and the poem's speaker, "not his mother, the woman after his mother" look on, noting that he looks "like someone // you could count on, one of the numbered / good on which the world depends."

Read more
Science
5:27 pm
Mon October 14, 2013

Richard Dawkins On The Making Of A Scientist

The Record's Steve Scher speaks with writer Richard Dawkins about his new memoir, The Making of a Scientist. To get his points across to the general public, he uses, science of course, as well as math and sometimes, poetry, like this one by the writer,  Aldous Huxley.

Read more
Books
4:40 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Thomas Patterson On Training Next Generation of Journalists

The Record’s Ross Reynolds interviews Thomas Patterson, a professor of government and the press at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, whose new book is Informing the News: The Need for Knowledge-Based Journalism. The book began as a look at what journalism schools need to do to train the new generation of reporters.

Presidential History
9:00 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

50th Anniversary Of JFK’s Assassination With Dean R. Owen

Dean R. Owen's book "November 22, 1963: Reflections on the Life, Assassination, and Legacy of John F. Kennedy"

November 22 marks the 50th anniversary of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. Journalist Dean R. Owen collected interviews from notable civil rights leaders, White House staff and others connected to Kennedy for his book, “November 22, 1963: Reflections on the Life, Assassination, and Legacy of John F. Kennedy.”

Owen spoke at the Elliott Bay Book Company on September 14, 2013. He was joined by Patricia Baillargeon, a contributor to his book who served as assistant to Eleanor Roosevelt.

Read more
Travel Reading Material
12:19 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

Nancy Pearl Book Recommendations

Bob Shacochis' book "The Woman Who Lost Her Soul" and Sherri Fink's book "Five Days at Memorial."

Nancy Pearl has been doing a lot of traveling; and along with that, of course, a lot of reading. She talks with KUOW’s Steve Scher about two books she read recently: "The Woman Who Lost Her Soul" by Bob Shacochis, and "Five Days at Memorial" by Sherri Fink.

Read more
More from KUOW
9:25 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Alice Munro, 'Master' Of The Short Story, Wins Literature Nobel

Alice Munro has won the Nobel Prize in literature. The 82-year-old author recently announced that she plans to stop writing." href="/post/alice-munro-master-short-story-wins-literature-nobel" class="noexit lightbox">
Canadian author Alice Munro has won the Nobel Prize in literature. The 82-year-old author recently announced that she plans to stop writing.
AFP Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 5:31 pm

Alice Munro has been awarded the Nobel Prize in literature, the Swedish Academy announced Thursday morning. The academy often explains its decision — what it calls the "prize motivation" — with lush precision; recent winners have been praised for their "hallucinatory realism," "condensed, translucent images" and "sensual ecstasy." But for Munro, the committee came straight to the point: They called her simply "master of the contemporary short story."

Read more
Nobel Prize
9:16 am
Thu October 10, 2013

Book News: Alice Munro Wins Nobel Prize In Literature

The Nobel Prize committee called Canadian author Alice Munro, seen in 2009, a "master of the contemporary short story."
Peter Muhly AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 6:42 am

This post was updated at 9:30 a.m.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Read more
Writing As Therapy
8:00 am
Sun October 6, 2013

13 For '13: Writer Eli Hastings Fuses Art And Healing

Writer Eli Hastings
Credit The Seattle Times/Dean Rutz

Eli Hastings remembers his first writing experience.  "My mom had given me a diary," he recalled. Hastings was in elementary school, and he scrawled down a little poem, the kind of insulting ditty that schoolboys hurl at one another on the playground.

Read more
Travel
11:43 am
Wed October 2, 2013

Seattle's Harriet Baskas Uncovers Hidden Treasures

Harriet Baskas' book "Hidden Treasures: What the Museums Can't or Won't Show You"

Seattle travel writer Harriet Baskas stumbled onto her quest for hidden treasures. More than 20 years ago, Baskas was visiting small museums in the Pacific Northwest. She was interested in the collections they had on display, but the curators she met were just as interested in what they had in the back rooms: treasures they couldn't, or wouldn't, show the public.

Read more

Pages