books

Nobel Prize Novelist
2:30 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Who Gave Voice To Latin America, Dies

Admirers ask Gabriel Garcia Marquez --€” seated alongside his wife, Mercedes Barcha €-- to sign books in Santa Marta, Colombia, in 2007.
Alejandra Vega AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 5:06 pm

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America's best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

A Writer Shaped By His Beginnings

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Accidental Jihad
3:54 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

Navigating Love, Marriage, And Two Different Cultures

Credit Krista Bremer's memoir, "My Accidental Jihad."

Marcie Sillman talks with author Krista Bremer about her memoir, "My Accidental Jihad." In it Bremer reflects on her marriage to a Libyan-born Muslim and the challenges she faced in a multicultural family.

Catholic Church
1:33 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

An Ex-Seminarian's Take On Sexual Abuse Scandal

Credit Fred Moody's book, "Unspeakable Joy."

Ross Reynolds interviews local author Fred Moody about his account of discovering his seminary's sexual abuse past in his book, "Unspeakable Joy."

This interview originally aired on November 18, 2013.

Economy
3:09 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

How Collaborative Commons Is The Beginning Of The End For Capitalism

Credit Jeremy Rifkin's latest book, "The Zero Marginal Cost Society."

Marcie Sillman talks with Jeremy Rifkin about his new book, "The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism."

Author Interview
3:34 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Emma Donoghue's New Novel 'Frog Music'

Credit Emma Donoghue's book, "Frog Music."

Marcie Sillman talks with writer Emma Donoghue about her new book, "Frog Music." It was inspired by the unsolved 1876 murder of a woman named Jenny Bonnet in San Francisco.

Donoghue also discusses about how fact inspires her fiction. Her award-winning novel, "Room," was about a 5-year-old boy and his mother who were kept prisoner by their father and husband, respectively, in a backyard shed. The book was based, in small part, on a real life story Donoghue had seen in the news.

Steinbeck's Classic
7:24 am
Mon April 14, 2014

'Grapes Of Wrath' Is 75, But Its Depictions Of Poverty Are Timeless

Dust Bowl farmer drives a tractor with his son near Cland, N.M. (1938). Steinbeck writes: "The tractors came over the roads and into the fields, great crawlers moving like insects, having the incredible strength of insects ... monsters raising the dust and sticking their snouts into it, straight down the country ... through fences, through dooryards, in and out of gullies in straight lines."
Dorothea Lange Library of Congress

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 1:42 pm

Much has been said and written about the Dust Bowl, but if you want to get a visceral feel for how it all began and the way it affected the people who experienced it, you need go no further than the opening pages of John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath:

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Good Reads
3:31 pm
Fri April 11, 2014

Nancy Pearl: A Memoir And A Story Of Hollywood

Credit Katie Hafner's book, "Mother Daughter Me." Mark Harris' book, "Five Came Back."

Steve Scher talks with librarian Nancy Pearl about two books, "Mother Daughter Me: A Memoir," by Katie Hafner and "Five Came Back: A Story of Hollywood and the Second World War," by Mark Harris.

Hafner writes about the difficulties and rewards that arise out of the changing patterns of modern life. It explores the relationships of women caring for their aging mothers and their growing daughters at the same time, often under the same roof.

Harris looks at five famous film directors who left Hollywood to document World War II.

Interview
8:40 am
Fri April 11, 2014

Kristen Wiig Gets Serious For Alice Munro Adaptation

Kristen Wiig plays a quiet caretaker named Johanna in Hateship Loveship.
Courtesy of Patti Perret, Hateship Capital LLC IFC Films

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 5:39 am

The new film Hateship Loveship was adapted from an Alice Munro short story and stars Saturday Night Live alumna Kristen Wiig in a performance that's a far cry from her outrageous characters on the comedy show.

In it, Wiig plays Johanna, a caretaker in Iowa assigned to help a grandfather, played by Nick Nolte, look after his 14-year-old granddaughter, Sabitha. Sabitha's mother died in a car accident when Sabitha's father, Ken, played by Guy Pearce, was driving drunk and high.

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Author Interview
2:59 pm
Thu April 10, 2014

Jared Diamond Aims Evolution Education At Youth

Professor Jared Diamond speaking at Leuven University, Belgium, 2008.
Credit Flickr Photo/Groucho

Marcie Sillman talks with author and professor Jared Diamond about an adaptation of his book, "The Third Chimpanzee: The Evolution and Future of the Human Animal." The adaption targets high school students.

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder
9:10 am
Thu April 10, 2014

The Untold Story Of War With Ann Jones

Credit Ann Jones' book, "They Were Soldiers."

Battle scars are not always visible.

Post-traumatic stress disorder affects almost 30 percent of soldiers who serve in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Journalist Ann Jones researched how war affects people’s minds by following troops in the Middle East. Her new book is called “They Were Soldiers: How the Wounded Return from America's Wars: The Untold Story.”

In it, Jones also looks at how war touches those close to soldiers: spouses, children, doctors and friends. She spoke at Town Hall on March 18, 2014.

Author Interview
2:55 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

Seeking Reconciliation For Fathers And Sons

Credit Garth Stein's book, "How Evan Broke His Head and Other Secrets."

Steve Scher talks with Garth Stein, author of "How Evan Broke His Head and Other Secrets." The book is about the ways fathers and sons seek some peace and mutual acceptance as they age.

Justice
2:11 pm
Wed April 9, 2014

An Eye For An Eye: Did It Make The World Blind?

Credit Thane Rosenbaum's book, "Payback."

Steve Scher talks with Thane Rosenbaum, author of "Payback: The Case For Revenge," about how we view the phrase "an eye for an eye" and the role of revenge in our current justice system.

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Book Reviews
9:18 am
Wed April 9, 2014

'Astonish Me' Is An Artful, Elegant Dance

Maggie Shipstead is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and the author of Seating Arrangements.
Alisha & Brook

Originally published on Thu April 10, 2014 6:46 am

"Etonnez-moi," Sergei Diaghilev, the founder of the Ballets Russes, used to say to his dancers. Astonish me. Maggie Shipstead's book of the same name does not astonish; rather, it charms. It is full of the kind of prose you want to curl up and nest in like a cat: seamless and full of small elegances.

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Good Reads
9:18 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Book News: Archie Comics Is Going To Kill Off Archie

Say It Ain't So: Archie Andrews meets his maker in Archie Comics' upcoming issue of Life with Archie.
AP

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 4:18 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Poetry
9:18 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Kima Jones, On Black Bodies And Being A Black Woman Who Writes

Kima Jones
Courtesy of Kima Jones

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 8:25 am

April is National Poetry Month — and at Code Switch, we like poems. We will be exploring a set of broad issues of race and ethnicity in modern poetry for the duration of the month.

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