books

Imagining Book Moments
2:59 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Photographing Literature's Famous Food Scenes

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"The kitchen table was loaded with enough food to bury the family: hunks of salt pork, tomatoes, beans, even scuppernongs." (To Kill a Mockingbird)
Dinah Fried

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 10:37 am

A confession: I've read Jack Kerouac's On the Road, but I can't tell you much about it. Yes, I know he's on a road trip. But beyond that, I don't recall any of the characters or anything they do or what the point was. What I do remember is that he described some truly great food. In fact, I liked those sections of the book so much that when I read them, I apparently felt the need to scribble them down, word for word, in a notebook.

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Racial Discrimination
2:48 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Stuart Taylor: Affirmative Action Is A Disservice To Minorities

Credit Stuart Taylor's book, "Mismatch."

Marcie Sillman talks with Stuart Taylor, Jr., a Brookings Institution nonresident senior fellow, about race and how it should or should not be used in college admissions or hiring practices.

Taylor is also the author of "Mismatch: How Affirmative Action Hurts Students It's Intended to Help, and Why Universities Won't Admit It."

Civil Rights
1:18 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Inside Cesar Chavez's Legacy And Struggles

Credit Miriam Pawel's book, "The Crusades of Cesar Chavez."

Ross Reynolds talks with Miriam Pawel about her new book, “The Crusades of Cesar Chavez: A Biography."

Chavez was the most influential Latino civil rights leader in American history. In the 1960s, he led migrant farm workers into a powerful force and national movement to boycott grapes.

But in his later years, the effort flagged, and Chavez's flaws became apparent. Pawel examines the man in full.

Book Reviews
9:58 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Better (?) Living Through Chemistry In 'Afterparty'

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 4:44 am

The question you have to ask yourself is, how juicy do you like your science fiction?

And I mean that in terms of a spectrum. To me, classic space operas are saltines — dusty and dry and fit only as a calmative after a long binge of weirder, more foreign flavors. William Gibson? He's ... moist. Rudy Rucker is a juicy peach. Paul Di Filippo is that same peach, a week gone and with a tooth stuck in it.

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Publishing Industry
9:57 am
Wed April 23, 2014

Book News: Gabriel García Márquez Left An Unpublished Manuscript

Writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in 1982, died last week at age 87.
Paco Junquera Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 8:17 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Bard's Words
9:18 am
Wed April 23, 2014

It's A Foregone Conclusion That You Are Quoting Shakespeare

Flickr Photo/Calamity Meg (CC-BY-NC-ND)

To celebrate William Shakespeare’s 450th birthday, Christopher Gaze takes a moment to remind you how the great playwright lives in the way you talk. Gaze is the artistic director of the annual Bard on the Beach festival in Vancouver, British Columbia.

Controversial Literature
8:08 am
Mon April 21, 2014

Campaign To Get Sherman Alexie Book To Idaho Students Tops Goal

File photo of Sherman Alexie's "The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian."
Kraemer Family Library Flickr

Originally published on Fri April 18, 2014 6:35 pm

Two women in Washington have raised enough money to send 350 copies of a controversial book by Sherman Alexie to students in Meridian, Idaho.

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Good Reads
3:19 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Exploring World War I Books With Nancy Pearl

Credit Clockwise: Margaret MacMillan’s “The War That Ended Peace,” Max Brooks’ “The Harlem Hellfighters,” James Carl Nelson’s “Five Lieutenants,” and Siegfried Sassoon’s “Memoirs of an Infantry Officer.”

World War I began 100 years ago this June. A century later, the Great War is still generating interest among scholars, writers and readers.

Steve Scher and librarian Nancy Pearl meet up at the University Bookstore, in front of a display of new and old books about the war to end all wars.

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Author Interview
3:18 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

William Easterly On Rethinking How We Give International Aid

Credit William Easterly's new book, "The Tyranny of Experts."

David Hyde talks with New York University Professor William Easterly about his new book, "The Tyranny of Experts: Economists, Dictators and the Forgotten Rights of the Poor."

Nobel Prize Novelist
2:30 pm
Thu April 17, 2014

Writer Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Who Gave Voice To Latin America, Dies

Admirers ask Gabriel Garcia Marquez --€” seated alongside his wife, Mercedes Barcha €-- to sign books in Santa Marta, Colombia, in 2007.
Alejandra Vega AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu April 17, 2014 5:06 pm

Latin American author Gabriel Garcia Marquez, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1982, died Thursday. He was 87. Garcia Marquez, the master of a style known as magic realism, was and remains Latin America's best-known writer.

His novels were filled with miraculous and enchanting events and characters; love and madness; wars, politics, dreams and death. And everything he had written, Garcia Marquez once said, he knew or heard before he was 8 years old.

A Writer Shaped By His Beginnings

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Accidental Jihad
3:54 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

Navigating Love, Marriage, And Two Different Cultures

Credit Krista Bremer's memoir, "My Accidental Jihad."

Marcie Sillman talks with author Krista Bremer about her memoir, "My Accidental Jihad." In it Bremer reflects on her marriage to a Libyan-born Muslim and the challenges she faced in a multicultural family.

Catholic Church
1:33 pm
Wed April 16, 2014

An Ex-Seminarian's Take On Sexual Abuse Scandal

Credit Fred Moody's book, "Unspeakable Joy."

Ross Reynolds interviews local author Fred Moody about his account of discovering his seminary's sexual abuse past in his book, "Unspeakable Joy."

This interview originally aired on November 18, 2013.

Economy
3:09 pm
Tue April 15, 2014

How Collaborative Commons Is The Beginning Of The End For Capitalism

Credit Jeremy Rifkin's latest book, "The Zero Marginal Cost Society."

Marcie Sillman talks with Jeremy Rifkin about his new book, "The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism."

Author Interview
3:34 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Emma Donoghue's New Novel 'Frog Music'

Credit Emma Donoghue's book, "Frog Music."

Marcie Sillman talks with writer Emma Donoghue about her new book, "Frog Music." It was inspired by the unsolved 1876 murder of a woman named Jenny Bonnet in San Francisco.

Donoghue also discusses about how fact inspires her fiction. Her award-winning novel, "Room," was about a 5-year-old boy and his mother who were kept prisoner by their father and husband, respectively, in a backyard shed. The book was based, in small part, on a real life story Donoghue had seen in the news.

Steinbeck's Classic
7:24 am
Mon April 14, 2014

'Grapes Of Wrath' Is 75, But Its Depictions Of Poverty Are Timeless

Dust Bowl farmer drives a tractor with his son near Cland, N.M. (1938). Steinbeck writes: "The tractors came over the roads and into the fields, great crawlers moving like insects, having the incredible strength of insects ... monsters raising the dust and sticking their snouts into it, straight down the country ... through fences, through dooryards, in and out of gullies in straight lines."
Dorothea Lange Library of Congress

Originally published on Mon April 14, 2014 1:42 pm

Much has been said and written about the Dust Bowl, but if you want to get a visceral feel for how it all began and the way it affected the people who experienced it, you need go no further than the opening pages of John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath:

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