books

book Christmas holiday reading
Flickr Photo/Enokson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman gets a last minute gift recommendation from Seattle's jolliest librarian, Nancy Pearl. If you still have a child on your list, she suggests picking up "Take Away the A," by Michael Escoffier and Chris DiGiacomo.

Author Richard Ford, Livre sur la Place, September 2014.
Flickr Photo/ActuaLitte

Ross Reynolds interviews Pulitzer prize-winning novelist Richard Ford about his new book of novellas, “Let Me Be Frank With You."

It continues the story of Frank Bascombe, which began in Ford's earlier works, "The Sportswriter," "Independence Day" and "Lay of the Land."

Welcome to the first meeting of the Morning Edition Reads book club! Here's how it's going to work: A well-known writer will pick a book he or she loved. We'll all read it. Then, you'll send us your questions about the book. And about a month later, we'll reconvene to talk about the book with the author and the writer who picked it.

Ready? Here we go:

Karen Finneyfrock
Courtesy of Inti St. Clair

If you could go back in time, what would you want to say to your teenage self?

Writers Karen Finneyfrock, Rachel McKibbens and Mindy Nettifee decided to gather poems they wished they'd had when they were younger. 

"If we could give [teenage girls] one charm to tuck into their pockets, it would be courage," reads an excerpt from the introduction of their new anthology, "Courage: Daring Poems for Gutsy Girls."

One of the most famous sights on the University of Washington Seattle campus is when the cherry trees bloom in the quad each spring.
Flickr Photo/Michael Matti (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds takes a tour of the University of Washington campus with Antoinette Wills and John Bolcer, co-authors of the new book "The University of Washington," which tells the 119 year history of the campus through the buildings. They talk about a 1960s bombing at UW that remains a great unsolved mystery and the story behind the strange stone faces atop all the buildings in the liberal arts Quad.

This week in 1941, Japanese forces attacked Pearl Harbor. Over the next few years, millions of Americans would leave home to fight in Europe and the Pacific. They had few comforts and little in the way of escape or entertainment — at least not until American publishers got involved.

War Service Library Bookplate, 1918
Flickr Photo/William Creswell (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman checks in with esteemed librarian Nancy Pearl to get her recommendation for a great historical read: "The Unsubstantial Air: American Flyers in the First World War," by Samuel Hynes.

United Methodist pastor Frank Schaefer speaks during a news conference Tuesday, June 24, 2014, at First United Methodist Church of Germantown in Philadelphia.
AP Photo/Matt Rourke

Ross Reynolds talks with Frank Schaefer, author of "Defrocked: How A Father's Act of Love Shook the United Methodist Church," about his decision to officiate his son's same-sex marriage and the ensuing case over his dismissal from position as pastor in the Methodist church.

This segment originally aired October 20, 2014.

Author Ruth Ozeki.
Flickr Photo/Kris Krug (CC-BY-NC-ND)

If you’re driving a car or operating other heavy machinery when you listen to this Speakers Forum podcast, we hope you’ll pull over for the guided meditation portion. But don’t be alarmed. This talk is more likely to invigorate and inspire you than put you under a spell. And it may change forever how you react when your smart phone vibrates with some bit of news.

Author Robert Dugoni at a book signing at the Tin Room Bar & Grill in Burien, Wash., in 2009.
Flickr Photo/Michael @ NW Lens

Ross Reynolds interviews local novelist Robert Dugoni about his latest mystery, “My Sister’s Grave."

In it, Seattle homicide cop Tracy Crosswhite learns that the remains of her missing younger sister have been found by two hunters in the woods after 20 years.

In the book's acknowledgments, Dugoni writes that real people inspired the main character: Seattle homicide detective Jennifer Southworth and  former King County Sheriff Sue Rahr. 

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Marcie Sillman gets a recommendation from gifted librarian Nancy Pearl for a book to help those seeking a little relief from the holiday bustle: "2 A.M. at The Cat's Pajamas," by Marie-Helene Bertino.

Author Anne Lammott at the lighting ceremony for the Rainbow World Fund's World Tree of Hope on Dec. 10, 2013 at San Francisco City Hall
Wikipedia Photo

Spirituality is never far from writer Anne Lamott's mind.

The Bay Area writer, a recovering alcoholic, is a proud and very liberal Christian. She's written extensively about her own life, and about her personal take on the power of prayer to help people get through crises.

Lamott's latest essay collection, "Small Victories," is a compilation of old and new work. In each essay, she contemplates daily, sometimes mundane, manifestations of grace.

Flickr Photo/Gexydaf (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with beloved librarian Nancy Pearl, who recommends a new history of WWI through the lens of poetry: Max Egremont's book, "Some Desperate Glory."

The movie “Wild” hits select theaters Friday, December 5. It's based on a memoir by a Portland author who made a life-changing trek on the Pacific Crest Trail.

Dr. Cornel West.
Flickr Photo/J&R Music World (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Are you caught in an egocentric predicament? You’ll be asked to consider such a question in this episode of Speakers Forum.

Dr. Cornel West speaks forcefully on a wide range of subjects including the struggle for truth and justice; political discourse and dysfunction; African American religious, cultural and music history; and the impact of the events in Ferguson, Missouri.

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