Boeing

Pot, Boeing And Art
9:00 am
Thu July 25, 2013

DEA Raids Pot Dispensaries, Art Of Our City, Boeing, Losing Art Collections

Seattle Art Museum's collection is privately owned, unlike the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. But it begs the question: What would Seattle look like without its cultural icons?
Flickr Photo/Alex Abboud and illustration by Kara McDermott

DEA Raids Puget Sound Pot Dispensaries
Federal drug enforcement agents raided marijuana dispensaries around Puget Sound on Wednesday afternoon. We’ll bring you the latest and speak with Alison Holcomb of the ACLU of Washington.

Art Of Our City: Precious Little
What are the limits of language? Sometimes we speak better when we communicate without traditional words or vocabularies. That’s one of the themes of Madeline George’s play “Precious Little.” It opens August 2 at Seattle’s Annex Theater. Director Katherine Karaus and cast members give us a taste of the play and talk about the role of language onstage and in life.

Update On Boeing
Boeing’s profit is up 13 percent, despite the troubles the company has been facing lately. The Boeing 787, 737 and 777 have all been in the headlines for fires and faulty landings. Boeing is looking for fixes to the problems as the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board continue to investigate the Asiana 214 crash in San Francisco, the 787 fire at Heathrow airport and the Southwest crash at LaGuardia. Christopher Drew, the Pentagon and aerospace reporter for the New York Times explains the latest news from Boeing.

What Does It Mean For A City To Lose Its Art Collection?
When the city of Detroit declared bankruptcy last week, creditors began to eye existing assets. One stood out: The art collection at the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. Appraisers put its value at roughly $2.5 billion. But is it that easy to sell off a cultural collection to pay off a city’s debt? And what does it mean to a city to lose that cultural collection? Seattle Art Museum Director Kimerly Rorshach explains some of the intangibles when it comes to valuing art.

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Dreamliner Fires
11:11 am
Fri July 12, 2013

More Problems On 787s Mean Turbulence For Boeing Stock

Originally published on Fri July 12, 2013 11:40 am

A Boeing 787 caught fire on the tarmac at London's Heathrow Airport on Friday, followed hours later by a technical problem aboard another 'Dreamliner' that forced the plane to turn back from a trans-Atlantic flight. The incidents sent Boeing's stock down more than 7 percent at one point.

The first incident involved an Ethiopian Airlines plane with no passengers aboard. The second occurred aboard a Thomson Airways flight en route from Manchester, England to Sanford, Fla.

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San Fransisco Plane Crash
11:43 am
Mon July 8, 2013

Too Early To Tell If Asiana Plane Crash Caused By Human Or Manufacturer Error

This aerial photo shows the wreckage of the Asiana Flight 214 airplane after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, Saturday, July 6.
AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez

The government of South Korea says its officials will inspect engines and landing equipment on all Boeing 777s owned by Asiana and Korean Air, which was the type of plane that crash-landed in San Francisco Saturday, killing two people and wounding dozens more.

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World Cruiser Christening
7:04 am
Fri June 28, 2013

Dream About To Take Flight For Seattle Couple

Seattle pilots Bob and Diane Dempster with their Douglas World Cruiser replica, 2013.
Credit Courtesy of Bob and Diane Dempster

In 1924, Seattle’s Sand Point was the site of one of the greatest aviation milestones of all time. But the event was eclipsed by other aviators like Charles Lindbergh and the Wright Brothers. Now, a Seattle couple wants to breathe new life into that momentous time with their own pioneering project.

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Your Take On The News
10:00 am
Fri June 21, 2013

Change Of Heart For The Police Guild, Boeing In Paris And More News Of The Week

  It’s Friday—time to talk over the week’s news. The president of the Seattle Police Officers’ Guild Rich O’Neill has said he’ll accept the DOJ reforms and urges the members of the police union to do the same. The state is preparing for a shutdown if a deal is not made on the budget. Airbus expresses its interest in Washington state, as Boeing’s 787 faces more trouble in the air. Our regular panel is in to discuss the news of the week. What news piqued your interest this week? Share your thoughts by email.

787
8:14 am
Mon June 17, 2013

Airbus Scores On Boeing Before Paris Air Show

The wide-body Airbus 350 completed its maiden flight in Toulouse, France on June 14.
Credit Airbus Industrie

The Paris Air Show opens today. It’s where manufacturers show off their new planes – and where Boeing and Airbus try to best each other.

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Fairchild Air Base
10:31 am
Thu May 23, 2013

Fairchild Loses First Round In Competition For Tankers

Boeing

Originally published on Wed May 22, 2013 4:55 pm

People living near Fairchild Air Force Base say they’re not worried by news they won’t get a brand new fleet of Boeing-built Air Force refueling tankers. The Air Force made the announcement Wednesday following a process that pitted Spokane against other other communities around the country.

McConnell Air Force Base in Kansas got the nod to be the first to house the new KC-46A refueling tankers. That dismayed Washington Sen. Patty Murray, who said she would press top Pentagon officials for an explanation.

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Puget Sound
12:42 pm
Mon May 20, 2013

Dipping Below The Surface Of Puget Sound

An octopus in Puget Sound
Credit Flickr photo/ cwilso

Most of us walk around on the surface of the earth, thinking that's all there is. But divers know better. There's just as much going on under the water as there is on land. We hear how dipping below the surface completely changed one diver's perspective.

This unusual interview comes from the podcast Here Be Monsters. Its creator, Jeff Emtman, is one of the recipients of KUOW's Program Venture Fund. He'll be moving to Seattle to do some reporting for us this summer.

Full list of stories from KUOW Presents, May 20:

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Social Issues
10:00 am
Mon May 20, 2013

Return Of The 787, The Ancient Maya And The End Of Life

Flickr Photo/Rob Shenk

Boeing 787 Back In The Air
Boeing’s 787 has returned to the sky after a four-month grounding by the FAA when an United Airlines Dreamliner took off this morning from Houston en route to Chicago’s O’Hare airport. Richard Aboulafia, aerospace analyst with Teal Group Corporation explains the impact of the 787 on Boeing and its flight future. 

In Search of the Ancient Maya
Archaeologist William Saturno has spent decades studying, excavating and documenting the ancient Mayan culture. He was the first person in 2,000 years to see the San Bartolo murals, and he recently discovered proof that the Maya did not believe the world would end in 2012 as commonly thought. What did that feel like? How did ancient Maya become the center of his work? What can we learn from the Mayans?  

Medical Interventions and the End of Life    
As science and technology improves, medicine changes. As Americans, we’ve come to expect that medical interventions can give us a new knee, help us survive cancer and help extend our lives far longer than in the past. But is intervention always a good idea? Retired doctor Jim deMain blogs about how to make decisions on when to end or extend life. 

International
10:00 am
Wed May 15, 2013

Robert Horton's SIFF Picks And News From Canada And Commerce

Seattle International Film Festival logo

Canada, Culture And Commerce
Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest news from Canada.  Film critic Robert Horton joins us with the films he's looking forward to seeing at this year's Seattle International Film Festival. Then, Jon Talton brings us the latest business news on Microsoft, Boeing and the Dow.

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News & Culture
10:00 am
Wed May 8, 2013

Canada, Culture And Commerce

Movie poster for "The Great Gatsby," to be released May 10.

News From Up North
Vancouver Sun political correspondent Vaughn Palmer brings us the latest from Canada.

"The Great Gatsby"
The latest film adaption of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s "The Great Gatsby" opens Friday. Film critic Robert Horton reviews the “strangeness” of Baz Luhrmann’s filmmaking and whether or not the anachronistic elements of the film worked.

The Successes And Failures In Local Business
Boeing is sending some engineering work to South Carolina, Microsoft is rethinking design elements of Windows 8 for PCs, and State Farm will begin hiring up to 1,000 jobs in Tacoma. Michael Parks has the latest on business news.

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Replacing Old Jets
8:51 am
Tue May 7, 2013

Air Force Says New Air Refueling Tanker Program On Track

Corey Parrish US Air Force

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 5:06 pm

Fairchild Air Force Base near Spokane is planning a public memorial service for three of its airmen killed in a mid-air explosion over central Asia. The cause of the air refueling tanker accident last Friday remains under investigation. The crash renews attention on a Boeing Company contract to replace the Air Force's aging tanker fleet.

The doomed Fairchild Air Force Base crewmates were flying a KC-135 Stratotanker built by Boeing in the early 1960s. By all accounts, Air Force mechanics keep the 50-year-old tanker fleet in good condition.

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Repairs To Start Immediately
12:02 pm
Fri April 19, 2013

FAA Accepts Boeing's 787 Battery Fix

A 787 destined for All Nippon Airways waits to be retrofitted and delivered at Boeing in Everett, WA.
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

This story was last updated on Saturday, April 20, 2013.

The Federal Aviation Administration confirmed it has accepted Boeing's proposed fix to the 787 battery system. It says next week it will issue instructions to operators for making changes to the aircraft.

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Pink Slips
7:29 pm
Thu April 18, 2013

Boeing Engineering Layoffs To Start Friday

Boeing plane manufacturing.
Credit Courtesy/Boeing Company

Boeing officials say pink slips will go out Friday to about a hundred engineers in the Puget Sound area. It’s the first round of more expected cuts for the engineering staff, which Boeing said it plans to reduce by 1,500 to 1,700 positions through layoffs and job openings that will not be filled.

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The Two-Way
7:01 am
Mon April 15, 2013

FAA Orders Inspection Of Boeing 737s

An American Airlines 737-800 aircraft in January. The 737-800 is one of several variants the FAA has ordered to be inspected.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 15, 2013 9:45 am

Federal aviation officials have ordered that more than 1,000 Boeing 737s be examined to see if a key part on the plane's tail section needs to be replaced, The Wall Street Journal reported Monday.

The Federal Aviation Administration issued the airworthiness directive for a pin that holds the 737's horizontal stabilizer to the rest of the tail, to see if it is in danger of failing prematurely. The horizontal stabilizer — also known as the tail plane — enables the pilot to control the aircraft's pitch.

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