Boeing

Inside Everett's Boeing factory.
Flickr Photo/Jetstar Airways (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Gary Chaison, professor of industrial relations at Clark University, about how the Boeing machinist vote will affect the future of labor negotiations in Washington and across the country.

Flickr Photo/Pylon757

Ross Reynolds and Marcie Sillman tackle the complex issues around the machinists' rejection of the Boeing contract offer. First, they speak with Jeff Johnson, President of the Washington State Labor Council, about the implications for labor here in Washington state. Then, Wall Street Journal's aerospace reporter Jon Ostrower explains just what resources are necessary to build a brand new airplane like the 777X in another state.

The machinists' two-to-one rejection of the Boeing contract was not the outcome Washington Governor Jay Inslee had hoped for.

KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

In a vote that could ultimately move Boeing out of Washington state, Boeing's machinists rejected the company's proposed contract, with 67 percent of union members opposed.

How Boeing Avoids The Negotiation Table

Nov 13, 2013
Flickr Photo/contemplative imaging

Ross Reynolds talks with aerospace and defense editor at Reuters, Alwyn Scott, about how Boeing's labor dispute compares to other union negotiations.

Boeing will get tax incentives and worker training under bills signed into law Monday by Washington Governor Jay Inslee.

Marcie Sillman interviews Sen. Patty Murray about Boeing's future in Washington state, the Employment Non-Discrimination Bill, and budget battles in Washington, D.C.

Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattle Times aerospace reporter Dominic Gates about negotiations between Boeing and Machinists District 751 to build the 777X in Everett.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Standing before a crowd of Boeing machinists on Thursday night, Tom Wroblewski, president of the Boeing machinists union, tore up a copy of the proposed contract and said he would try to stop it from coming to a vote.

“I know this is a piece of crap,” Wroblewski said, according to The Seattle Times.

The machinists before him were openly hostile to the eight-year deal, which would replace their health care costs and strip down their pensions.

Boeing handout

Boeing’s announcement that much of the detailed design work on the 777X jetliner will take place outside Washington state is a play for better tax incentives, according to a top aviation analyst.

KUOW Photo/Sarah Waller

There’s a mysterious object standing in a parking lot just eight miles south of downtown Seattle. From the surface, it looks like a grayish-green dome on a pile of rubble. But dig a little deeper and you’ll discover a forgotten link to Seattle’s Cold War past. 

Retired Boeing engineer Dan Witmer is one of the few remaining people in Seattle who knows what that dome is covering up: a defunct Minuteman missile silo.

Japan Airlines is buying $9.5 billion worth of new jetliners from Airbus, placing its first-ever order with the European plane-maker for 31 A350s to replace the carrier's aging fleet of Boeing 777s.

The airline's president, Yoshiharu Ueki, said the order was unrelated to Boeing's problems with the 787, but the huge order is seen as a major coup for the Toulouse, France-based manufacturer at the expense of its American rival.

The production line at a Boeing facility.
Courtesy/Boeing Company

Governor Jay Inslee said on Wednesday that he will propose to extend tax breaks to Boeing -- so long as the aerospace giant agrees to build the 777X in Washington.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The economic future of this region is still tied to the future of  Boeing, the region's bellwether employer.  The aerospace industry pays 7.5 percent of the wages in Washington state, and Boeing remains the region’s largest private employer, with 85,000 local jobs.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

All Nippon Airways is preparing to announce a decision that could mark a turning point in the battle between Airbus and Boeing. The Japanese airline wants to buy 25 new planes worth an estimated $7 billion. It will choose between Boeing Co.’s 777X and Airbus SAS’s A350, both wide-body planes.

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