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Best Of Record

Geoffrey McGrath: The Inadvertent Spokesman For Gay Rights

Jan 29, 2015
Geoffrey McGrath delivers a petition bearing more than 125,000 signatures, urging Amazon to stop donating money to the Boy Scouts on May 21, 2014.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Marcie Sillman talks with Seattleite Geoffrey McGrath about his path from a hiking/biking software engineer  to international spokesperson for gay rights after his membership from the Boy Scouts of America was revoked for his sexual orientation.

This story originally aired June 4, 2014.

Ms. Marvel designs by Adrian Alphona. Ms. Marvel, described by writer G. Willow Wilson as "kind of a hipster," is the second from the left.
Marvel Comics

G. Willow Wilson’s origin story, in a matter of speaking, started in New Jersey on about 3 acres of land surrounded by old-growth woods, where her parents raised rabbits and chickens and grew corn, blackberries and sweet potatoes.

Wounded In Afghanistan, But Still Running

Nov 11, 2014
AP Photo/Mary Schwalm

On Edward Lychik's 21st birthday, his fellow troops gave him a gift.

The Army combat engineer normally rode in the first truck in his convoy. Lychik's job was to ensure the road his battalion traveled in Afghanistan was bomb-free.

To celebrate Lychik's big day, his comrades let him ride in the rear — the convoy's last truck.

Courtesy of Lincoln County Historical Society

In the competitive world of fishing, joining forces can be tough work. It’s even more difficult if the two parties are superpowers at the height of Cold War tensions.

Jennifer Hopper in KUOW's green room in 2014.
KUOW Photo/Akiko Oda

A life can change in a moment.

For Jennifer Hopper, that moment was July 19, 2009, the night Isaiah Kalebu broke into the South Park home that Hopper shared with her fiancée Teresa Butz. The man repeatedly stabbed and raped the two women. Butz died on the street in front of her home.

Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington professor Joe Janes about online reputation management.

Flickr Photo/Derrick Coetzee (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Ann McGettigan, executive director of Seattle Counseling Service, about the history of the organization and her role in the LGBT community. The program was founded in 1969, when its founder noticed that there were runaways in Pioneer Square -- many of them had been kicked out of their homes. 

Flickr Photo/Charlie Brooks (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde speaks with cultural historian, musician and writer Peter Bacon Hales about Jimi Hendrix's cover of Bob Dylan's "All Along The Watchtower," which is the subject of a chapter in his new book, "Outside The Gates Of Eden: The Dream Of America From Hiroshima To Now."

Pacific Northwest Ballet/Jerry Davis

When Pacific Northwest Ballet artistic director Peter Boal arrived in Seattle in 2005, he was ready to lead Seattle's premier dance company into the 21st century. It was a challenge that excited him, but becoming the head of his own company meant that Boal had to leave behind his own long and celebrated career with New York City Ballet.

An Eye For An Eye: Did It Make The World Blind?

Apr 9, 2014
Thane Rosenbaum's book, "Payback."

Steve Scher talks with Thane Rosenbaum, author of "Payback: The Case For Revenge," about how we view the phrase "an eye for an eye" and the role of revenge in our current justice system.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

David Hyde speaks with former President Jimmy Carter about growing up in Georgia, politics and his new book, "A Call To Action: Women, Religion, Violence, and Power."

All In The Family: Bringing Cannabis Business To Port Townsend

Mar 26, 2014
Flickr Photo/Patrick Nelson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Port Townsend father-son duo, Martin Gay and Dakota Sandoval, eagerly anticipate the fate of their marijuana business as Washington State Liquor Board starts issuing licenses next month.

Gay and Sandoval’s business, Jefferson County Cannabis Company, was among more than 7,000 applications that were submitted in December to legally grow pot in the state.

Salman Rushdie's new memoir, "Joseph Anton."

It was Valentine’s Day 1989 when Salman Rushdie got a call from a BBC reporter. She asked him how it felt to be sentenced to death by the Ayatollah Khomeini. He thought, “I’m a dead man.”

Starting at the age of 41, Rushdie spent almost 10 years living under the threat of murder because of a book he’d written, "The Satanic Verses."

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Of the nearly 1,050 traffic signals in Seattle, about 100 have audible traffic signals. Pedestrians who have gotten used to the chirps and cuckoo sounds are contending with a new tone. So far, multiple people have described the new “rapid ticks” as jarring, according to the Seattle Department of Transportation.

Copyright (c) 2012 by Ellen Forney. Reprinted by arrangement with Gotham Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA), Inc.

When Ellen Forney was diagnosed with bipolar disorder 16 years ago, her first concern was for her creative future. The award-winning cartoonist prided herself on the artwork and stories she'd come up with during periods she described as manic. Right after her diagnosis, Forney was reluctant to try the drug treatments her psychiatrist prescribed for her. Would she lose her creative edge on lithium? But after a serious period of depression, Forney set out on the ongoing journey to achieve and maintain a state of mental balance.

Courtesy of Susan Hutchison

Ross Reynolds checks in with Washington State Republican Party Chair Susan Hutchison to talk about the state of the GOP in Washington and her plans for leading the party into the future.

Suicide Prevention: 'Give Message Of Support And Challenge The Stigma'

Feb 24, 2014
Flickr Photo/ashley rose, (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Jennifer Stuber, a supporter of the legislation to educate primary care providers on identifying signs of suicidal behavior. Stuber, whose husband killed himself in 2011, believes that training health care professionals could save lives.

Elizabeth Gilbert's historical fiction "The Signature of All Things."

Marcie Sillman sits down with author Elizabeth Gilbert, whose memoir "Eat, Pray, Love" was turned into a movie, about her return to fiction in "The Signature of All Things."

This interview originally aired on November 8, 2013.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Allie Brosh’s artistic style on her popular illustrated blog, Hyperbole and a Half, is, as she described it, purposefully crude.

“I feel it’s a more accurate representation of me then I am,” she told The Record’s Arwen Nicks. “It’s a better way to convey what I’m trying to say and to get my sense of humor across then say a more realistic drawing.”

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Comedian John Hodgman and songwriter John Roderick came by KUOW’s studios to promote their show at 8 p.m. on Friday at the Neptune Theatre in the University District. What followed, however, was a wonderfully meandering conversation that focused on ribbing our dear host Steve Scher.  

Highlights are below, but honestly, you should listen, because you will laugh out loud.  

Flickr Photo/Great Beyond

Before the government shutdown, the House of Representatives voted to cut $40 billion from the federal food stamp program. Senate Democrats and President Obama have said they will block the plan.

Even so, the debate over food stamp funding is worrisome for people who receive food assistance. It comes on the eve of scheduled cuts to SNAP beneficiaries that will go into affect in November, when the federal government's American Recovery and Reinvestment Act expires.

David Hyde talks with Kent resident Catherine Hernandez about how her family uses food stamps. Later in the hour, Ross Reynolds talks with John Camp, administrator for the Department of Social and Health Services' food assistance program about distributing food stamps in Washington.