Bernie Sanders | KUOW News and Information

Bernie Sanders

Sarah and her friends Aisha and Anisa. Sarah came to support Sanders and "what he stands for."
KUOW Photo/John O'Brien

Around 15,000 people showed up to see Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders on Sunday at Seattle Center. Many started lining up seven hours before Sanders was scheduled to speak.

KUOW’s John O’Brien covered the rally and spoke with several of Sanders supporters about why they’re supporting the Vermont senator. Listen to a selection below and view the photo gallery above.


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Andrea Hidalgo, left, and Monal Shah, 29, were both undecided on Wednesday evening. Like many undecideds, they said they like Bernie Sanders' ideals but believed Hillary Clinton would more likely be able to get progressive measures passed.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

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Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders spoke to 15,000 supporters in and outside Key Arena, March 20, 2016.
KUOW Photo/John O'Brien

Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders scorched a path across Washington state yesterday in his bid to win the Democratic presidential nomination.

And while his stop in Seattle may not have reached Legion of Boom levels, things got plenty loud in Key Arena.

Audio Pending...

The GOP presidential field dropped by one candidate on Tuesday night, but Republicans are still no closer to uniting behind a nominee.

Democrats, however, did get more clarity as Hillary Clinton racked up more wins over Bernie Sanders, extending her delegate lead and complicating the Vermont senator's nomination calculation.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Sen. Bernie Sanders has won the Democratic caucuses in Maine, a victory that means he'll be taking home most of the state's 25 delegates at stake.

With nearly all of the state's precincts reporting, Sanders leads rival Hillary Clinton by double digits, with more than 64 percent of the vote.

Mara Willaford on the podium at a rally for presidential candidate Bernie Sanders in August.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

In August, presidential candidate Bernie Sanders was in downtown Seattle for a rally. As he started speaking, he was interrupted by two women who are part of the Black Lives Matter movement. Their simple act – taking the mic – sent the country into heated debate.

Hillary Clinton won the South Carolina Democratic primary on Saturday, notching a decisive win in a state where she suffered a devastating loss just eight years ago.

The Associated Press called the race for the former secretary of state over rival Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders just seconds after the polls closed at 7 p.m. ET. With all precincts reporting, Clinton beat Sanders by nearly 50 points, winning 73.5 percent to 26 percent.

Since he first announced his presidential campaign, Bernie Sanders has stuck to one simple promise. One that has many young people, in particular, #feelingthebern: free college.

As Sanders put it in his New Hampshire victory speech: "When we need the best-educated workforce in the world, yes, we are going to make public colleges and universities tuition-free."

The Pitch

As Bernie Sanders sees it, Wall Street got a big boost when U.S. taxpayers bailed out some of the largest financial institutions in 2008. Now it's time for Wall Street to return the favor.

Sanders has proposed something he calls a speculation tax, a small levy on every stock, bond or derivative sold in the United States.

The revenue would go toward free tuition at public colleges and universities and would also be used to pare down student debt and pay for work-study programs, as well as other programs, Sanders says.

Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders won clear, early and decisive victories in the New Hampshire primary Tuesday night.

Trump beat the GOP field by double digits. He got 35 percent of the vote, well ahead of surprise second-place finisher John Kasich, who pulled in 16 percent. Kasich was followed by Ted Cruz at 12 percent, Jeb Bush at 11 percent and Marco Rubio, who, after a poor debate performance Saturday, faded to fifth just shy of 11 percent.

The Democratic National Committee and the presidential campaign of Bernie Sanders have reached an agreement to restore the campaign's access to the DNC's massive voter file.

The decision, announced just after midnight Saturday, capped off a chaotic day in which the DNC blocked the Sanders campaign from accessing the national database, which plays a critical role in campaigns' strategies and daily operations.

Bernie Sanders, senator from Vermont and presidential candidate, and Councilmember Kshama Sawant at a rally held at Westlake Center this fall.
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

Bill Radke talks to John Nichols, political reporter for The Nation, about presidential candidate Bernie Sanders' speech defining Democratic Socialism and what it means for socialist candidates, including Seattle City Councilmember Kshama Sawant.

All week long, Bernie Sanders has been getting questions about sexism. The charges have been fueled by comments his campaign manager made, saying Sanders would consider Clinton for vice president.

These are not the sorts of questions the Vermont senator, who considers himself a feminist, and candidate for the Democratic nomination wants to be answering.

Should he even have to answer them? Is the accusation fair? Does it go too far?

Portland teen Angela Wilcox poses with presidential candidate Rand Paul at a rally in Seattle.
Liz Jones/KUOW

Presidential hopeful Rand Paul continued his Western tour with campaign stops in Seattle and Spokane Wednesday.

At Seattle’s Town Hall, hundreds chanted “President Paul” as he took the stage. Afterward, many waited in a long line to get a photo with the candidate.

More Americans say they would vote for a Muslim or an atheist for president than they would for a socialist, according to a recent Gallup Poll. Yet "socialist" is now how Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has described himself throughout his career.

Sanders has not run from the term, even as he surges in his race for president.

Sen. Bernie Sanders drew big crowds again this weekend, but they may not be the right kind of crowd if he hopes to win South Carolina's primary. The Independent senator from Vermont is seeking the Democratic presidential nomination, and he'll need black voters to win in the early-voting state.

Bernie Sanders supporters packed UW's Hec Edmundson Pavilion on Saturday, Aug. 8, 2015 to hear him speak.
Flickr Photo/Hollywata (CC BY ND 2.0)

Senator Bernie Sanders has been storming the country to raise interest in his populist-themed presidential campaign.

He hit a potential hurdle in Seattle when Black Lives Matter activists blocked him from speaking at a rally in Westlake Park, but later that same day Sanders appeared before the largest crowd he had yet addressed of approximately 15,000 people at the University of Washington. 

Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, who is running for president in 2016.
Flickr Photo/Brookings Institution (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

Bernie Sanders, the independent senator from Vermont, hasn’t minced words calling for a political revolution, which could appeal to Washington’s liberal pockets.

“Liberal progressive candidates generally do well here, and I would say that would bode well for Bernie Sanders' prospects,” University of Washington political science professor Mark Smith told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds.

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