Bernie Sanders | KUOW News and Information

Bernie Sanders

Fully 12 percent of people who voted for Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., in the 2016 Democratic presidential primaries voted for President Trump in the general election. That is according to the data from the Cooperative Congressional Election Study — a massive election survey of around 50,000 people. (For perspective, a run-of-the-mill survey measuring Trump's job approval right now has a sample of 800 to 1,500.)

Senator Patty Murray in the KUOW offices, Jan. 2016.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

A proposal for a federal $15 minimum wage was rolled out in Congress Thursday. Washington U.S. Senator Patty Murray and Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders introduced the bill.

Seattle, San Francisco, Los Angeles and New York, among other jurisdictions, have all decided on a minimum wage of $15 an hour.

Bernie Sanders thinks he has a pretty good idea why Hillary Clinton and Democrats lost in the 2016 election.

"Look, you can't simply go around to wealthy people's homes raising money and expect to win elections," the Vermont senator, who gave Clinton a surprisingly strong run for the Democratic nomination, told NPR's David Greene in an interview airing on Morning Edition. "You've got to go out and mix it up and be with ordinary people."

Senator Bernie Sanders at University Temple United Methodist Church
KUOW Photo/Sonya Harris

It may come as no surprise to you to hear that Bernie Sanders is not done. He was on the post-campaign trail last week, with a stop in Seattle to promote his new book, “Our Revolution: A Future To Believe In.”

Even after a bruising election season and outcome, Sanders says the majority of Americans agree with his vision of progress. He challenges us to “think big” about progressive change.

In Bernie Sanders' new book, Our Revolution, the Vermont senator tells the story of his life, his career and his run for the Democratic presidential nomination.

He also spells out the programs he believes the country should adopt to combat such ills as inequality, discrimination and lack of opportunity, not to mention the burdens of college and health care costs.

Sanders says he was not shocked by Donald Trump's victory. But he says the election results show it is time for the Democratic Party to undergo a fundamental reassessment.

Amy Radil

Former presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders made a campaign stop at the Showbox in Seattle Saturday. This time his rally was not for himself, but on behalf of Pramila Jayapal, one of the two Democrats running in the 7th congressional district. Her opponent is Brady Walkinshaw.

Bernie Sanders is launching a new political organization. It's called Our Revolution. It aims to support candidates and, according to its website, "advance the progressive agenda that we believe in."

But the revolution is getting off to a rocky start.

At the Green Party national convention in Houston, Bernie Sanders may have been mentioned more often so far than the party's own presumptive nominee, Dr. Jill Stein.

The progressive third party has a rare opportunity to expand their reach by picking off disaffected supporters of the Vermont senator. The group had planned to have about 250 people at their quadrennial gathering, but organizers said in the past few weeks interest exploded and that now more than 500 people are expected.

Nick Vaidyanathan of Seattle joined the protest inside the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night.
KUOW PHOTO/DAVID HYDE

Nick Vaidyanathan of Seattle helped shout down former CIA director Leon Panetta at the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night – and he's not sorry about it.

There was no script for the protest Tuesday night by Bernie supporters, who walked out after Hillary Clinton's formal nomination and jammed the media center.
KUOW PHOTO/KATE WALTERS

If you compare the tone of the Republican convention with Bill Clinton's speech on Tuesday night and Michelle Obama's two nights ago, you could argue that the Democrats are more positive.

But that’s what you see on stage. These are giant theatrical productions.

Boos from Bernie Sanders supporters drowned out U.S. Rep. Marcia Fudge, the convention chair, when she mentioned Hillary Clinton on Monday.
KUOW photo/David Hyde

If you want to have the Hillary Clinton-Bernie Sanders divide explained in two sound bites, you could do worse than Jack Smith and Pamela Eakes.

State Rep. Noel Frame on giving Bernie supporters some space: "Frankly it's a little bit of a grieving process. And I think we need to understand and respect that."
KUOW Photo/David Hyde

It was an all-star cast as the Democratic National Convention kicked off last night in Philadelphia.

Al Franken. Sarah Silverman. Cory Booker. Michelle Obama. Bernie Sanders.

And Washington state’s delegation heard their messages for Sanders’ supporters: Unite, and vote for Hillary Clinton.


Washington State Democratic Party chair Jaxon Ravens at a pre-convention event on July 24.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Bill Radke talks with Washington State Democratic Party chair Jaxon Ravens about leaked DNC emails that many Bernie Sanders supporters say prove the party's primary contest was stacked against him.

Jonathan Tong, a school teacher from Kenmore, traveled to Philadelphia to protest outside the Democratic National Convention.
KUOW Photo/Kate Walters

Bill Radke speaks with KUOW's David Hyde about growing protests outside the Democratic Convention in Philadelphia. Radke also speaks with protester Jonathan Tong, a school teacher from Kenmore, Washington. 

The National Congress of American Indians invited four presidential candidates to its mid-year conference in Spokane this week. But only one addressed the Congress directly.

Washington Democrats are gathering this weekend in Tacoma for their state convention. Just like with the state Republican convention in Pasco last month, Democrats are a party divided. Hillary Clinton is the presumptive nominee. But Bernie Sanders supporters represent the majority of delegates.

Three days ahead of California's Democratic presidential primary, Bernie Sanders made several appearances in Southern California before headlining a rally in San Diego.

There was a Sunday morning walk through a farmers market in Downtown Los Angeles. There was a walk through West Hollywood, LA's gayborhood, with a pre-drag brunch address to diners at a hamburger joint on Santa Monica Boulevard. That was followed by a stroll through Santa Monica Pier, where the candidate rode a merry-go-round and even interrupted an outdoor spin class fundraiser to give an impromptu stump speech.

The Democratic Party about to nominate a historic candidate. That candidate's opponent not ready to accept that reality.

Bernie Sanders?

No, Hillary Clinton in 2008.

Despite badly lagging in the delegate count, Bernie Sanders' campaign manager told NPR the campaign believes Sanders can and will be the Democratic nominee by winning over superdelegates at the 11th hour.

Amy Goodman, host of Democracy Now!, addressing the Chicago Green Festival in 2010.
Chris Eaves/Wikimedia Commons CC by 2.0

Amy Goodman, host of Democracy Now! on activist power: 

Bernie Sanders did not start a movement; he tapped into a movement.

The Occupy movement, which never really ended, even though people thought that didn't amount to a hill of beans.

Oh, that's not true.

You say the 1 percent today. And the 99 percent. Everyone knows what you mean. They occupied the language. The word “occupy” was the most looked-up for use word of 2011.

(You change the language, you change the world.)

Bernie Sanders is staying in the race until the last primary and the nation will be better off for it, he told NPR's Steve Inskeep in an interview that will air Thursday on Morning Edition.

Inskeep, passing on questions he had invited on Twitter, asked Sanders if he is "threatening [his] revolution" by continuing to run, potentially scaring some voters away from supporting Hillary Clinton — the likely Democratic nominee — in November.

Charles Adkins, 18, is running to be a delegate for Bernie Sanders at the Democratic National Convention.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Just before Bernie Sanders took the stage at a packed Key Arena in March, the Seattle crowd heard a new voice in Washington state politics: Charles Adkins. 

He's a Native American high school student who used to be homeless. 

Hillary Clinton's presidential campaign raised $26.4 million last month, beating the campaign of Sen. Bernie Sanders financially for the first time in 2016.

Sanders has routinely outpaced Clinton in fundraising this year thanks to a dedicated base of small donors. But these latest numbers indicate a political pivot; Clinton's fundraising is accelerating while Sanders' is slowing.

Bernie Sanders supporters packed UW's Hec Edmundson Pavilion on Saturday, Aug. 8, 2015 to hear him speak.
Flickr Photo/Hollywata (CC BY ND 2.0)

Bill Radke speaks with political scientist Megan Ming Francis about why Bernie Sander's message appeals more here in Washington than in other states and what that means for the future of the Democratic Party. 

Bernie Sanders scored huge-margin victories Saturday in the caucuses in Washington state, Hawaii and Alaska.

Sanders won with 82 percent in Alaska, 70 percent in Hawaii and 72 percent in Washington. That Washington margin was even bigger than the Sanders campaign expected — and significant, because there are 101 delegates up for grabs there.

Precinct volunteers count caucus votes at Martin Luther King Jr. Elementary School in Seattle on Saturday, March 26. Democrats turned out across the state to support Bernie Sanders or Hillary Clinton.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders defeated Hillary Clinton by a wide margin Saturday in Washington state's Democratic caucuses, according to party results.

Niah, April and Jasmyne Sims pose outside Safeco Field before the Bernie Sanders rally Friday in Seattle.
KUOW photo/John O'Brien

Bernie Sanders hit familiar themes in his ballpark appearance in Seattle Friday.

The presidential candidate spoke to thousands of people at his second Seattle appearance in less than a week. People lined up outside Safeco Field hours ahead of the rally.

Neighbors and protesters greet Hillary Clinton's motorcade as the candidate arrives at a private fundraiser in Medina, Washington.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

If campaign contributions are any indicator, Washington state is "feeling the Bern."

People here have given Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders 30 percent more money than they have to his Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton through the end of February. Sanders' $2.6 million Washington war chest is more than all Republican candidates combined have received from the state.

Andy Hurst talks with volunteers at Bernie Sanders' campaign office in Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood. We also hear from Hillary Clinton volunteers at a phone-banking event in Seattle's Mt. Baker neighborhood.

The sign for Rainier Brewing Company, brewed in Seattle from 1878 to 1999. The company is now owned by Pabst Brewing Company. Since Rainier left the city, however, micro and nano brewers have popped up in the city.
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC By 2.0)

If Larry Adams, a bartender at Blue Moon Tavern, were serving Bernie Sanders, he’d give him cider. A can of Schilling, because that’s what they have there.

Pages