author interview

Holly George-Warren's book, "A Man Called Destruction."

Ross Reynolds talks with author Holly George-Warren about her new biography of musician Alex Chilton, "A Man Called Destruction: The Life and Music of Alex Chilton, From Box Tops to Big Star to Backdoor Man."

Stuart Taylor's book, "Mismatch."

Marcie Sillman talks with Stuart Taylor, Jr., a Brookings Institution nonresident senior fellow, about race and how it should or should not be used in college admissions or hiring practices.

Taylor is also the author of "Mismatch: How Affirmative Action Hurts Students It's Intended to Help, and Why Universities Won't Admit It."

Miriam Pawel's book, "The Crusades of Cesar Chavez."

Ross Reynolds talks with Miriam Pawel about her new book, “The Crusades of Cesar Chavez: A Biography."

Chavez was the most influential Latino civil rights leader in American history. In the 1960s, he led migrant farm workers into a powerful force and national movement to boycott grapes.

But in his later years, the effort flagged, and Chavez's flaws became apparent. Pawel examines the man in full.

David Cay Johnston's new book, "Divided."

David Hyde talks with investigative reporter and author David Cay Johnston about his new book, "Divided: The Perils of Our Growing Inequality." The book comprises a collection of essays on the growing wealth gap and how economies grow while citizens get poorer.

Flickr Photo/Jason Howie (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Seattle author Maria Semple about why she thinks social media is the biggest threat to writing and art since Peter Criss' first solo album.

Nell Lake's book, "The Caregivers."

Marcie Sillman talks with journalist and author Nell Lake about her new book, "The Caregiver: A Support Group's Stories of Slow Loss, Courage, and Love."

William Easterly's new book, "The Tyranny of Experts."

David Hyde talks with New York University Professor William Easterly about his new book, "The Tyranny of Experts: Economists, Dictators and the Forgotten Rights of the Poor."

Krista Bremer's memoir, "My Accidental Jihad."

Marcie Sillman talks with author Krista Bremer about her memoir, "My Accidental Jihad." In it Bremer reflects on her marriage to a Libyan-born Muslim and the challenges she faced in a multicultural family.

Jeremy Rifkin's latest book, "The Zero Marginal Cost Society."

Marcie Sillman talks with Jeremy Rifkin about his new book, "The Zero Marginal Cost Society: The Internet of Things, the Collaborative Commons, and the Eclipse of Capitalism."

Emma Donoghue's New Novel 'Frog Music'

Apr 14, 2014
Emma Donoghue's book, "Frog Music."

Marcie Sillman talks with writer Emma Donoghue about her new book, "Frog Music." It was inspired by the unsolved 1876 murder of a woman named Jenny Bonnet in San Francisco.

Donoghue also discusses about how fact inspires her fiction. Her award-winning novel, "Room," was about a 5-year-old boy and his mother who were kept prisoner by their father and husband, respectively, in a backyard shed. The book was based, in small part, on a real life story Donoghue had seen in the news.

The Way To Go: Kate Ascher On Transportation And Infrastructure

Apr 11, 2014
Kate Ascher's book, "The Way to Go."

Steve Scher sits down with urban development consultant Kate Ascher to talk about her new book, "The Way To Go: Moving By Land, Sea and Air."

Flickr Photo/Groucho

Marcie Sillman talks with author and professor Jared Diamond about an adaptation of his book, "The Third Chimpanzee: The Evolution and Future of the Human Animal." The adaption targets high school students.

An Eye For An Eye: Did It Make The World Blind?

Apr 9, 2014
Thane Rosenbaum's book, "Payback."

Steve Scher talks with Thane Rosenbaum, author of "Payback: The Case For Revenge," about how we view the phrase "an eye for an eye" and the role of revenge in our current justice system.

Walter Kirn's book, "Blood Will Out."

Ross Reynolds speaks with novelist Walter Kirn, perhaps best known for book, “Up in the Air."

Kirn’s latest work reads like fiction, but it’s not. “Blood Will Out: The True Story of a Murder, a Mystery, and a Masquerade” is about Kirn's association with a man who called himself Clark Rockefeller and claimed to be a member of the Rockefeller family — one of the most powerful families in American history.

It turns out, Clark Rockefeller was not a Rockefeller nor an American. He was a murderer.

Kembrew McLeod's book, "Pranksters."

Ross Reynolds talks with Kembrew McLeod, a professor of communication studies at the University of Iowa, about his book, "Pranksters: Making Mischief in the Modern World."

McLeod argues that pranksters are more than mischief makers and entertainers. They have an underlying social message and prompt public discussion.

He recounts pranks going back four centuries including Benjamin Franklin and Seattle's own Megan Jaspers from Sub Pop Records.

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