Ask A... | KUOW News and Information

Ask A...

KUOW is launching a series of person-to-person conversation events we call "Ask A..."

The concept is simple: Get 12 people from a group that’s in the news and set up conversations with 12 people who want to know more about the group.

It's a way to break out of our echo chambers and make connections with others in our community.

Learn more about this series.

List of Events:

Ask a Muslim, Part I (July 24, 2016) — Listen to highlights from the event. 

Ask a Muslim, Part II (April 2, 2017) — Listen to highlights from the event. 

Ask a Trump Supporter (April 30, 2017) — Listen to highlights from the event. 

Ask an Immigrant (July 22, 2017) — Listen to highlights from the event. 

Ask a Transgender Person (August 20, 2017) — Sign up to be a part of the event

Ask a Cop (TBA) — Sign up to be a part of the event

Ask a TBA (October 1, 2017) — We'll be keeping our eye on the news to determine the subject of this event

Participants discussed Muslim cultures at KUOW studios at 'Ask A Muslim', Feb. 22, 2016.
Naomi Ishisaka

One reason we’re seeing such polarization in American society is that we’re not talking to each other. We’re wrapped up in our own cocoons and echo chambers.

In an effort to combat this, KUOW is launching a series of person-to-person conversation events we call 'Ask A __.'

Floribert Mubalama speaks with Julia Donk about his experiences as an immigrant on  July 22, 2017 as part of KUOW's Ask An Immigrant event.
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

Questions surrounding immigration are regular parts of the news cycle these days. We hear stories of immigrants being harassed, detained and deported. We hear stories of families separated.

Many of us may not have the opportunity to talk to immigrants about their experiences. KUOW created a space for those questions recently at an "Ask an Immigrant" event in Bellevue. 

KUOW’s "Ask a ___" events create a safe and respectful environment for people to explore each other's views. 

Ask a Trump voter: Six voters explain themselves

May 5, 2017
Erika, who does not support Trump, asks questions of Bob, who does.
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

As Donald Trump's first 100 days as president came to an end in April, KUOW gathered Trump supporters and opponents together for an "Ask a Trump Supporter" event in Bellevue. The goal was to start a dialog across the political divide — and for deep blue Seattleites to understand what led some to vote for Trump.

Ask a Muslim participants at the New Holly Gathering Hall on April 2, 2017.
Courtesy of Baron Visuals

What if you lived in a place where people often looked at you with suspicion? How would you get past that — the stares, the mistrust, or worse? Given the chance, what would you want people to know about you?

KUOW has been hosting a series of “Ask a ___” events. The goal is to create a safe and respectful environment for people to explore each other's cultures. 

Coming soon: Ask a transgender person

Mar 23, 2017
Pride flag Seattle LGBTQ
Flickr Photo/Cloganese (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1LPdJO9

One reason we’re seeing such polarization in American society is that we’re not talking to each other. We’re wrapped up in our own cocoons and echo chambers.

In an effort to combat this, KUOW is hosting an Ask a Transgender Person event on August 20.

Coming soon: Ask a cop

Mar 23, 2017
Recruits from around the region, including Seattle Police Department, on the first day at the police academy.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

One reason we’re seeing such polarization in American society is that we’re not talking to each other. We’re wrapped up in our own cocoons and echo chambers.

In an effort to combat this, KUOW is hosting an Ask a Cop event on July 8.

Mohamed Bakr talks with Glenda Johnson (left) at KUOW's Ask a Muslim event on July 24, 2016 at the New Holly Gathering Hall.
KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

Islam is the fastest growing religion in the world today. In 2010, researchers counted 1.6 billion Muslims around the globe; approximately 23 percent of the world population. 

There are 3.3 million Muslims in the United States; approximately 1 percent of our population. In the wake of 9/11, President George Bush said this about Muslim Americans: