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arts

Poet Rachel Zucker
Courtesy of Rachel Zucker

Several years ago, poet Rachel Zucker was asked to write a lecture about poetry. That process led her, in part, to question what it is that poets do — and why.

She recently presented that lecture, “The Poetics of Wrongness,” as part of the Seattle Arts & Lectures Poetry Series.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Award winning short story writer Nina Allan has just published her first novel. Although bookstores and libraries may file it in the science fiction/fantasy section, librarian Nancy Pearl tells KUOW's Marcie Sillman that Allan's book "The Race" is best described as experimental fiction.

Artist Sara Porkalob in her Queen Anne apartment
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Jose Abaoag has an eclectic resume.

Deborah Wang talks to Erik Vance about his book, "Suggestible You: The Curious Science of Your Brain's Ability to Deceive, Transform and Heal."  

Vice President-elect Mike Pence was presumably seeking a quiet night out at the theater, enjoying one of Broadway's hottest tickets with a Friday night performance of Hamilton: An American Musical.

What he got instead was a welcome of boos and cheers from the crowd and a pointed plea from the diverse cast and crew afterwards about what they believe really makes America great.

Courtesy of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer Collection, MOHAI

Seattle's food scene is booming.

Not only is it doing well economically, but people come from all over the world to try our oysters and berries and stroll Pike Place Market.


Photo of Melissa Ponder

Ampersand Magazine is a production of Forterra, a Seattle-based conservation and community-building organization. Ampersand Live is a gathering of poets, artists and storytellers keen on preserving and celebrating the fragile bond between society and nature in the Pacific Northwest. 

Courtesy of The Discovery Channel

Ranae Holland, a host of Animal Planet’s "Finding Bigfoot," had a sense Hillary Clinton wouldn’t win the election.

KUOW's Marcie Sillman with book hugger Nancy Pearl.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Terry McDonnell spent his career as an editor at an assortment of national magazines, and he's got the dirt of the writers he worked with. Nancy Pearl  tells KUOW's Marcie Sillman you'll find some great stories in McDonnell's essay collection, "The Accidental Life."

This year, the National Book Awards ceremony comes at a time when the nation has rarely seemed more divided. The bitter presidential campaign exposed a fault line in the United States that will not easily be repaired. And while there's no one simple answer, Lisa Lucas, head of the National Book Foundation, recommends one way to understand the other side: read.

"My life is small" she says, "and I think books are a way to make your life larger."

Bill Radke speaks with Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz and Dina Gilio-Whitaker about their new book, "All The Real Indians Died Off And 20 Other Myths About Native Americans."

Popular music, like every creative form, has produced iconoclasts and idols, whose charisma intersects with the historical moment to carry them into a singular space of greatness. Leonard Cohen was not that kind of star. He was the other kind, arguably more necessary: the companionable genius, compelled by the need to track the muse through the hallways of the everyday, to understand how profane existence can be shot through with profundity.

Singers Taylor Raven, right and Jorelle Williams rehearse for the upcoming Seattle Opera production of "As One"
GENEVIEVE HATHAWAY, COURTESY SEATTLE OPERA

When Aidan Lang took over the helm of Seattle Opera two years ago, he faced the same challenge as every other nonprofit arts group in the city:

How to make both his organization and its art form relevant in the digital age.

In honor of the 50th anniversary of the CMA Awards, show producers worked a truly impressive number of performers into the Nov. 2 telecast, utilizing everything from moving medleys to photo montages and mentions of legends seated in the audience.

Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, Level of Confidence, 2015
Courtesy of the artist / Photo: Antimodular Research

Bill Radke speaks with Stranger art critic Jen Graves about the curious sense of techno-human kinship she felt while viewing Robots Building Robots

The multimedia art exhibition is at Seattle University's Hedreen Gallery until December 10th.

Bill Radke talks to biotech journalist Luke Timmerman about his new book, "Hood: Trailblazer of the Genomics Age." 

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Most of the time, Nancy Pearl loves a good literary thriller. But sometimes, she just likes to chill out with a page turner. Today she tells KUOW's Marcie Sillman about a new writer she's just discovered named Becky Masterman, author of a series featuring a retired FBI agent. The book is called "Rage Against the Dying."

For some, death isn’t spooky or scary like Halloween. Hispanic families across the Northwest are preparing to celebrate the Day of the Dead.

Poet Lucia Perillo
Courtesy of James Rudy

The accolade "local treasure" is not easily awarded. Poet Lucia Perillo earned that and many other awards, including a MacArthur Genius Grant. 

Perillo died in Olympia on October 16 at the age of 58. She had lived with multiple sclerosis since her diagnosis in 1988.

Mark Frost is the co-creator of 'Twin Peaks' filmed in North Bend, Washington.
Courtesy photos

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Mark Frost, co-creator of the 90s television show Twin Peaks, about his new book "The Secret History of Twin Peaks" and the upcoming revival of the show on Showtime next year. Frost will be holding an event at the Elliot Bay Book Company on October 29.

Kurt B. Reighley and Mark Mitchell together at the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Matt Martin

Bill Radke speaks with Mark Mitchell and his partner Kurt B. Reighley about why they decided to move to Tucson after living in Seattle for 30 years.  Mitchell is a costume designer and artist, Reighley is DJ El Toro on KEXP.

Adnan Syed, whose murder conviction was exhaustively explored in the first season of the hit podcast Serial, has asked a judge to release him on bail.

His lawyers said they filed the request in a Maryland court on Monday.

Syed is currently waiting to go to trial — again. This summer, a judge agreed that Syed's defense attorney had mishandled his case during his murder trial in 2000, and granted a new trial.

Oxford University Press has announced that its new edition of the complete works of William Shakespeare will credit Christopher Marlowe as a co-author on the three Henry VI plays.

Despite years of controversy about the authorship of some of Shakespeare's work, this is the first time a major publishing house has formally named Marlowe as a co-author.

Maria Semple at Town Hall Seattle
KUOW Photo/Sonya Harris

If you don’t already love Maria Semple’s Seattle-brewed writing, her new work may pull you in. Just one day in the life of protagonist Eleanor Flood will likely leave you wanting more.

Black Lives Matter national co-founder Patrisse Khan Cullors
photo by Inye Wokoma, courtesy Intiman Theatre

In September 2014, Patrisse Khan-Cullors was still bowled over by the recent police shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.

Brown's death pushed Khan-Cullors and two fellow activists to start the Black Lives Matter grassroots movement. Khan-Cullors herself is credited with conceiving #blacklivesmatter.

Nancy Pearl.
Flickr Photo/KCTS 9

October is prime time to stay inside with a book. Nancy Pearl tells KUOW's Marcie Sillman about a novel that should keep readers happy: "After the Parade," by Lori Ostlund.

Larry Mizzell, Jr. at the 2010 Pop Conference.
Wikimedia Photo/Joe Mabel (http://bit.ly/2dj7Fcp)

This summer City Arts Magazine did a cover story on Seattle's Larry Mizell Jr.

The story put Mizell at the center of what the author called a black renaissance in Seattle.

Bob Dylan has won the 2016 Nobel Prize in literature. The prolific musician is the first Nobel winner to have forged a career primarily as a singer-songwriter. What's more, he's also the first American to have won the prize in more than two decades. Not since novelist Toni Morrison won in 1993 has an American claimed the prize.

Bill Radke speaks with Melanie McFarland, TV critic for Salon, about how MTV's Real World franchise has changed since 1997, the last time the cameras came to Seattle. Her report: things have not improved. Real World Seattle: Bad Blood premieres October 12.

Karen Finneyfrock gives a contemporary voice to the Statue of Liberty in 'The Newer Colossus.'
Courtesy of Inti St. Clair

In "The Newer Colossus," Seattle performance poet and novelist Karen Finneyfrock gives voice to one of the most recognizable icons of America's immigrant history: the Statue of Liberty.

She told KUOW's Elizabeth Austen that a childhood visit to the Statue of Liberty and Emma Lazarus' 1883 poem "The New Colossus," which is engraved on the statue's pedestal, form part of the background inspiration for her poem.  

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