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Twenty years ago, on March 10, 1997, TV audiences were introduced to Buffy Summers, a pint-sized blonde who could hold her own against the undead. Buffy the Vampire Slayer ran for seven seasons from 1997 to 2003. It had witty dialogue and used monsters as a metaphor for everyday high school problems like bullies, catfishing and feeling invisible.

Courtesy of Jane Richlovsky

Bill Radke talks to Seattle artist Jane Richlovsky about why she wants people to rethink how artist keep their business alive as the city of Seattle grows. 

Her talk "When Artist Get Together They Talk About Real Estate" is available through Humanities Washington. 

Claudia Castro Luna

Bill Radke and Elizabeth Austen mark International Women's Day with a conversation about a poem that echoes across 150 years of activism.

Seattle civic poet Claudia Castro Luna performs Sojourner Truth's "Ain't I A Woman?" It's based on a speech Truth gave at a women's rights convention in 1851. Castro Luna responds with a poem of her own reflecting her perspective as an immigrant from El Salvador in "Am I Not An Immigrant?"  


toilet
Flickr Photo/dirtyboxface (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/epNYWW

Bill Radke talks with professor Philip Fernbach, co-author of the new book "The Knowledge Illusion," about how people don't know nearly as much as they claim, whether it's about politics, science or even how a toilet works. Fernbach has found that we as a species share knowledge, which both helps society as well as gives us a self-inflated sense of how much we actually know. This is one reason, he says, that we may want to be a little more humble next time we think about starting an argument

Parents: Be gardeners, not carpenters

Mar 7, 2017
Developmental psychologist Alison Gopnik
Wikimedia Photo/Kathleen King (CC BY-SA 3.0) http://bit.ly/2miDSmR

Bill Radke sits down with child psychologist Alison Gopnik, author of the new book "The Gardener and the Carpenter." Gopnik explains her problems with modern parenting and how to better face the unexpected that comes with raising a child. 

George Saunders at KUOW 2/28/17
Ross Reynolds

What happens when we die? Writer George Saunders speculates on what happens to Abraham Lincoln’s young son Willie when he dies in his first novel "Lincoln in the Bardo." Most of the book takes place in a cemetery and is described as having the ambience of Hieronymous Bosch and Tim Burton.

Courtesy of Chris Bennion

The Sandbox Radio troupe brings radio theatre to life with their always original, often surprising work. Our presentation of their “New And Improved?” episode features the following performances:

Courtesy of Angela Carlye

In 1963, John Lewis was 23 years old when he addressed a crowd of over 200,000 people at the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Lewis was already a veteran of the civil rights movement. He had been a devoted anti-segregation and voting rights activist in college and was one of the original 13 Freedom Riders who dared to ride integrated buses into the segregated South. He had become the chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and a colleague of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Teatro Zinzanni, on lower Queen Anne in Seattle
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Update: Teatro Zinzanni announced this week it will give its final performance in the Queen Anne location on Sunday, March 5th. The dinner/cabaret theater has been actively seeking a new location in central Seattle.

Zinzanni founder and director Norm Langill wrote a letter to supporters this week to break the news of the temporary closure. 

Seattle Opera declined an offer of $8 million dollars from the developer who's buying the land; an Opera spokeswoman says work on its new headquarters must begin this spring so the Opera staff can move in before the lease on its current offices expires in 2018.

Original story:

Seattle Opera will move ahead with the sale of property it owns on lower Queen Anne hill. 

That means long-time tenant Teatro Zinzanni will have to leave the square block.

Roxane Gay speaks at TEDWomen2015 - Momentum, May 27-29, 2015, Monterey Conference Center, Monterey, California, USA.
Marla Aufmuth/TED via Flickr (CC BY-NC 2.0) https://flic.kr/p/ybtHLA

“What did you have for breakfast this morning?”

It was a question to set microphone levels, the first question put to Roxane Gay, feminist-writer rock start, at her Seattle hotel room last week. 

“I didn’t have breakfast this morning,” Gay said.

“Did you have coffee or anything to drink?”

“No,” she said. “I had water.”

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Despite the allure of technology, librarian Nancy Pearl says picture books still draw in readers of all ages.

She tells KUOW's Marcie Sillman about two books in particular: "Roberto the Insect Architect," by Nina Laden and "Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World's Most Famous Bear," by Lindsay Mattick with illustrations by Sophie Blackall.

A salty (sexy?) prayer to withstand 'Trump lunacy'

Feb 28, 2017
David Schmader delivered this 'prayer' as part of OUTRAGE ONSTAGE, held at the Sanctuary in West Seattle in honor of #NotMyPresidentsDay on Feb. 20.
Courtesy of Emilio Cerrillo

Hello! My name’s David Schmader.

I’m a writer and solo performer, and there’s a thing that happens to performers that I imagine every performing artist will recognize, and it involves the five minutes right before you go onstage, when there’s no more time to prep or practice and you’re just … waiting.

How does a person end up in Nickelsville?

Feb 28, 2017
Courtesy of Derek McNeill

Bill Radke speaks with filmmaker Derek McNeill about his new documentary "The Road to Nickelsville." Radke also speaks with Colin McCredie, a man who lived in the Nickelsville homeless camp. There will be a screening of the film Sunday, March 5, at the Northwest Film Forum at 7 p.m

We watched more than 6,000 videos. Ten judges weighed in. Now, the 2017 Tiny Desk Contest has a winner.

National Geographic contributing photographer Joel Sartore is 11 years into a 25-year endeavor to document every captive animal species in the world using studio lighting and black-and-white backgrounds. So far, he's photographed 6,500 different species, which leaves approximately 6,000 to go.

Well, excuse me while I throw away my first draft, won't you?

Artist John Feodorov in his West Seattle home
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

John Feodorov is Native American. And he’s an artist. But don’t call his work “Native American art.”

“Not everything I want to say needs to be adorned with beads and feathers,” he says.

Courtesy of James Allen Smith

Bill Radke speaks with filmmaker James Allen Smith about his latest project to meet Trump supporters. Smith recently drove his Prius from Seattle to Lynden to talk with people who voted for Trump. He is posting those conversation on his YouTube channel

It's one of the oldest clichés of horror movies: the black guy dies first. But that's not the case in the new film "Get Out," written and directed by Jordan Peele (best known for the Comedy Central series "Key And Peele"). Gene and guest host Eric Deggans chat with Peele about his new film, check in with African-American filmmaker Ernest Dickerson, who's directed many scary movies and TV shows, and dive deep into race in horror-movie history with Robin Means Coleman, who's been analyzing and writing about the genre for over a decade.

Two decades ago only about 9 percent of children's books published in the U.S. were about people of color. Things have changed since then, but not by much.

On Wednesday, the Cooperative Children's Book Center at the University of Wisconsin, Madison's Education School revealed that in 2016, it counted 427 books written or illustrated by people of color, and 736 books about people of color out of about 3,400 books it analyzed. That adds up to 22 percent of children's books.

Do voter ID laws hurt minority turnout? Study says: Absolutely

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

In Great Britain, the term "crime fiction" refers to everything from a cozy mystery to a police procedural. Here in the U.S., we divide our crime fiction into separate genres, according to librarian Nancy Pearl.

A mystery starts with the world out of kilter, and ends with everything put to rights again. A police procedural focuses on the nuts and bolts of solving crimes.

And a thriller? Well, as Nancy Pearl told KUOW's Marcie Sillman, a thriller is a page turner, as addictive as potato chips. "You can't stop with just one," says Pearl.

Pearl recommends two thrillers: "The Drifter" by Nick Petrie and "August Snow" by Stephen Mack Jones.

Author Helen Macdonald at Benaroya Hall
Courtesy of Libby Lewis Photography

In her acclaimed memoir "H Is for Hawk," author Helen Macdonald reflects on the shock and depression she experienced at the unexpected death of her father. The two had a close bond, marked by their mutual fascination with nature.

Thrown by her loss and struggling with depression Macdonald, an experienced falconer, chose to train a notoriously difficult-to-handle raptor, a Northern Goshawk. She called her Mabel.

music concert
FLICKR PHOTO/Avarty Photos (CC BY-SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/ffNvCc

Bill Radke speaks with Jonathan Zwickel, senior editor of City Arts magazine about local music you should be listening to. Zwickel puts out a monthly list of local artists for City Arts called "Attractive Singles."

Is Thunderpussy too offensive to trademark?

Feb 13, 2017

Bill Radke talks to Molly Sides and Leah Julius of the Seattle band Thunderpussy and their struggle to trademark a name that the federal government has deemed too offensive. A case currently in the Supreme Court will determine if their name, among others, will be given trademark status. The members discuss why a trademark is so important, the misconceptions about their name and why they struggle with other names, such as the Washington Redskins, that would also benefit from this ruling.  

What happens when a person decides their gender at birth is not that one they were meant to be? If that person is a child, the question has ramifications for everyone in the family. Marcie Sillman speaks with Laurie Frankel about her new book, "This Is How It Always Is." The novel tells the story of a young transgender girlFrankel talks about the parallels between her own life and the family in the novel.

Ade Connere, at home on Seattle's Capitol Hill
KUOW photo, Marcie Sillman

Ade Connere doesn’t have a personal gender pronoun preference.

“It usually depends on what I’m wearing!”

How can we see a better Seattle?

Feb 9, 2017
Courtesy of Chuck Wolfe

Bill Radke speaks with Seattle writer and land use attorney Chuck Wolfe about how people view the cities they live in. Wolfe says people are caught up in either loving or hating the rapid growth that is happening in Seattle. But what should we do about that? His idea: keep an urban diary. Wolfe explains exactly what he means by that in his new book, "Seeing the Better City: How to Explore, Observe, and Improve Urban Space."

Tod Marshall, Washington state poet laureate
Amy Sinisterra

Washington state poet laureate Tod Marshall has just completed the first half of his two-year term. KUOW's Elizabeth Austen (Marshall's predecessor in the role) checks in with him about what it's like to travel the state talking poetry in a time of political upheaval.

Marshall reads a brand-new, as-yet-untitled poem that wrestles with, among other things, a persistent double-standard of accountability.

Marchers walk through Seattle's Central Area on the 2015 anniversary of the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.
KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

When Reverend David Billings started giving anti-racism trainings in the 1980s, he said many people "just didn't see it." But he said that's not the case today.

While structural and cultural racism remains entrenched in the U.S., Billings see a growing awareness by whites of their privilege and their role in combating the problem.  

Below are four of his main talking points. 


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