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In 1932, a new singing style was emerging: crooning. What we might consider easy listening now wasn't necessarily received cordially by its contemporaries. Cardinal O'Connell of Boston described it as "imbecile slush" and "a degenerate form of singing.”

Marcie Sillman interviews author Adam Rogers about his new book, "Proof: The Science of Booze." In it, he explores topics like what makes an excellent glass of whiskey, when humans first started to consume fermented fruits, and how we've developed the process of creating a good cocktail over the centuries.

Flickr Photo/UGArdener (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with librarian of the airwaves Nancy Pearl about her suggestions for great mysteries.  Pearl just returned from a 10-day English walking tour. She traced the Thames River from its source all the way to Windsor Castle. The long walk reminded Pearl of some of the British mystery fiction she enjoys.

Peter Temple writes prize-winning thrillers, four of them about his sometimes hapless investigator, Jack Irish. The books capture Melbourne, Australia: its pubs, racetracks, big boulevards rattling with traffic, and narrow alleys — called lanes — painted with graffiti.

Jack Irish was headed for a life as a successful suburban solicitor, or lawyer, when one of his criminal clients murdered Jack's wife, and Jack dropped the law to become a drunk. The novels — some are now TV movies — begin with his surfacing and looking around for his life.

Love On Death Row

Jun 27, 2014

David Hyde talks with Damien Echols about the book he co-authored with his wife, Lorri Davis, "Yours For Eternity: A Love Story On Death Row."

KUOW Photo

For the average NPR listener, hearing the name Garrison Keillor may summon up the sound of his voice: deep and soothing, wise and mischievous, but with a palpable tinge of sadness. Keillor spoke at Seattle’s University Bookstore on June 12.

Marcie Sillman speaks with author Deborah Rodriquex about her new book, "Margarita Wednesdays."

Rodriguez' best-selling memoir "Kabul Beauty School" chronicles her years in Afghanistan, and her role in helping women their learn a trade. Rodriguez had to flee Afghanistan shortly after her U.S. book tour and the experience left her with post traumatic stress disorder.

"Margarita Wednesdays" describes how the journey to recovery brought her back into a hair salon.

We eat first with our eyes. When strawberries are perfectly red, they seem to taste sweeter. When chicken is painted blue, it's disturbing. The ancient Romans understood that, and certainly today's top chefs exploit it when they plate their food.

Obama Lookalike Gets Around Town

Jun 25, 2014

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And today's last word in business. "Like A Rolling Stone" - the only handwritten copy of that famous Bob Dylan song about a person down on his luck, sold at auction this week to someone who clearly isn't.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Flickr Photo/Mike Arieta (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

The "Frozen" shark has been jumped.

How many months have we been saying, “enough of that song from Disney's 'Frozen!'” The song “Let It Go” has been inescapable on the web, television and the radio. But it's not so bad — it’s not like Pearl Jam is doing it.

That is, until Friday night in Milan, Italy, when Eddie Vedder and the boys were in the middle of playing their song, “Daughter.”

I guess it reminded Eddie of his own daughters, that he's gotten older and so have you.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

KUOW reporter Deborah Wang was researching the Seattle city charter a few weeks ago when she found the lyrics of the official city song. She found words, but no sheet music.

In 2009, Forbes rated designer Yves Saint Laurent the "Top-Earning Dead Celebrity" of the year. (Surely a bittersweet distinction.) Now, Saint Laurent's success — and how it was shaped and fed by his lover and manager Pierre Berge — is the subject of the new film Yves Saint Laurent. In it, their relationship is both interactive and supportive.

People who can't clap on the beat drive comedian Aaron Michael King crazy, especially one group in particular. He devoted a whole YouTube sketch to ... some white people he knows.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And our last word in Business today is a thriller.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Or is it a coming-of-age novel?

INSKEEP: Well actually, it's a case of mistaken identity. "Joyland" is the title of bestseller Stephen King's new book.

MONTAGNE: "Joyland" is also the title of the debut coming-of-age novel by Emily Schultz published back in 2006.

INSKEEP: Aw. Some readers thought they were ordering the newest Stephen King book from Amazon and instead they got confused.

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Rodney Crowell performs with the ease and swagger of a man comfortable in his ways. He carries his songs the way he carries his old guitar: out in the open, no case, almost as an extension of his body.

A Conversation With Saxophonist Kenny G

Jun 5, 2014
Kenny G
AP Photo/ Jim Cooper

Sax man and bestselling instrumentalist of all time, Kenny G, needs no introduction. Following stints with Barry White’s Love Unlimited Orchestra (at the age of 17) and The Jeff Lorber Fusion, the Seattle native and UW grad embarked on a solo career in the early 1980s.

Seattle Repertory Theatre/Alan Alabastro

After almost three decades on the job, Seattle Repertory Theatre Managing Director Ben Moore will retire at the end of June.

Peter Stark's book, "Astoria: John Jacob Astor and Thomas Jefferson's Lost Pacific Empire."

David Hyde talks to author Peter Stark about his new book, "Astoria: John Jacob Astor and Thomas Jefferson's Lost Pacific Empire."

Copyright (c) 2012 by Ellen Forney. Reprinted by arrangement with Gotham Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA), Inc.

When Ellen Forney was diagnosed with bipolar disorder 16 years ago, her first concern was for her creative future. The award-winning cartoonist prided herself on the artwork and stories she'd come up with during periods she described as manic. Right after her diagnosis, Forney was reluctant to try the drug treatments her psychiatrist prescribed for her. Would she lose her creative edge on lithium? But after a serious period of depression, Forney set out on the ongoing journey to achieve and maintain a state of mental balance.

Courtesy of Beth Sellars

Standing in the middle of the main gallery at Cornish College of the Arts, you're surrounded by color: Artist Robert C. Jones' large paintings are vivid swaths of red and green, yellow and blue; punctuated by black lines or circles.

Coming Out Of The Depression Closet

Dec 19, 2013
Flickr Photo/Piermario (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher sits down with psychiatrist Thomas Patamia with suggestions on how to talk about depression with your family.

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