arts & life

Personal Identity
10:21 am
Thu March 20, 2014

‘The Science Of Self’ With Jennifer Ouellette

Jennifer Ouellette's book, "Me, Myself, and Why."

What defines us? What determines our identity?

Jennifer Ouellette explores how eye color, likes and dislikes, and even hatred of cilantro construct our individual identities. She underwent personality tests and genome sequencing to determine the slight variations that set us all apart.

Ouellette is a blogger for "Scientific American" and the author of “Me, Myself, and Why: Searching for the Science of Self.” She spoke at Town Hall on February 25, 2014.

Music Interviews
10:03 am
Thu March 20, 2014

From Preacher To Grass Cutter To Earth-Shaking Soul Singer

St. Paul and The Broken Bones is led by singer Paul Janeway (front).
David McClister Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 11:08 am

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Performing Arts
9:39 am
Thu March 20, 2014

Why Oscar Wilde Still Works: 'People Will Always Have Secrets!'

Kate Wisniewski, Connor Toms, Emily Grogan, and Kimberly King in Seattle Shakespeare Company’s 2014 production of “The Importance of Being Earnest.”
Credit Courtesy of Seattle Shakespeare Company/John Ulman

Oscar Wilde is one of those people: You've heard of him, even if you've never read his novels or seen one of his plays.

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Northwest Wildlife
4:15 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Conservationists Work To Restore Wolf Population In Western Washington

Gray wolf
Flickr Photo/Bethany Weeks (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde speaks with Jay Kehne of Conservation Northwest about efforts to restore the gray wolf population in the western regions of Washington State.

Higher Education
3:19 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

How To Make A $10K College Degree

Flickr Photo/SalFalko (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with author Anya Kamenetz about her book, "DIY U: Edupunks, Edupreneurs, and the Coming Transformation of Higher Education," and her proposal for a bachelor's degree that costs a total of $10,000.

Book Interview
3:08 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

The Science And Art Of Receiving Feedback

Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen's book. "Thanks for The Feedback."

Ross Reynolds speaks with Douglas Stone and Sheila Heen, lecturers on law at Harvard Law School, about their new book, "Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well." In the course of writing their previous best-seller, "Difficult Conversations," Stone and Heen found that getting feedback, at work or at home, often creates the most difficult conversations.

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Mancini Lives!
1:26 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

'Swing Years' Theme Song Explained

The most frequently asked question of The Swing Years and Beyond is “What is your theme?”

Played at the top of each Swing Years show, it’s "Royal Blue" from "The Pink Panther" soundtrack. The film came out in 1963 and the album was released in 1964, featuring lounge and lush instrumentals by Henri Pancini … er, Mancini!

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Sports Industry
12:19 pm
Wed March 19, 2014

Has Seattle Sounders’ Success Trickled Down Into Pioneer Square?

Salvatore Savago, "The Hot Dog King," sells about $1,000 worth of tube steaks on Sounders game days. That's more than three times his regular haul.
Credit KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Sounders FC soccer team played their first Major League Soccer game five years ago Wednesday. In that time, the team’s fans have broken attendance records over and over.

But has the team’s financial success trickled down into the community? It depends on who you ask.

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Seattle Symphony Media
9:33 am
Wed March 19, 2014

Seattle Symphony Launches New Venture To Release Own Recordings

The Seattle Symphony performs at Benaroya Hall.
Flickr Photo/kmaschke (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The Seattle Symphony is joining the ranks of other major orchestras across the country with the creation of an in-house production company called Seattle Symphony Media.

The venture launches with the release of three new recordings, one of which was made during a live performance.

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Santa Muerte
5:56 am
Wed March 19, 2014

'Saint Death' Now Revered On Both Sides Of U.S.-Mexico Frontier

Claudia Rosales kneels in front of her home altar devoted to Santa Muerte, or Saint Death. Rosales put up a statue of the saint in the city that was taken down by the mayor of Matamoros.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 2:40 pm

The intrepid tourist who visits the market in the border city of Matamoros will find her between the onyx chess sets and Yucateca hammocks. She looks like a statue of the Grim Reaper dressed in a flowing gown. She is Santa Muerte, or Saint Death.

Originally revered as an underground folk saint in Mexico, her popularity has jumped the Rio Grande and spread to Mexican communities throughout the United States.

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Author Interview
3:26 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Carol Cassella On Weaving Together Medicine And Prose

Carol Cassella's book "Gemini."

Marcie Sillman sits down with Bellingham author and anesthesiologist Carol Cassella to talk about her new book, "Gemini." Cassella will be available at a series of local events coming up.

College Basketball
3:26 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

March Madness In The Workplace

Flickr Photo/mvongrue

Steve Scher talks with Andy Challenger, vice president of the outplacement firm Challenger, Gray and Christmas, about the firm's report that the college basketball tournament costs billions of dollars in worker productivity.

Giving Back
12:45 pm
Tue March 18, 2014

Fighting Discrimination Against Disabled Kids In Nepal

Photographer Robert Rose in Nepal.
Courtesy of Robert Rose

Steve Scher talks with Robert Rose, a Bellevue-area portrait photographer, about challenging Nepal's cultural bias against the disabled community. In 2005, he started the Rose International Fund for Children, a non-profit organization that seeks to assist children with disabilities in Nepal .

Childhood Link
11:18 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Who Had Richer Parents, Doctors Or Artists?

Artists painting mural
Tim Pannell Corbis

Originally published on Wed March 19, 2014 11:59 am

A few weeks ago, we were sitting around the office arguing over this simple question: Who had richer parents, journalists or people working in finance? Doctors or artists? More generally: What's the link between household income during childhood and job choice during adulthood?

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Writing On A Cloud
7:42 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Weekly Innovation: Paper Notebooks That Become Digital Files

Mod Notebooks sell for $25 each, which includes a prepaid envelope and digitization.
Courtesy of Mod Notebooks

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 9:14 am

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