arts & life

When Nikita Khrushchev emerged as the leader of the Soviet Union after Stalin's death in 1953, one of the first things he addressed was the housing shortage and the need for more food. At the time, thousands of people were living in cramped communal apartments, sharing one kitchen and one bathroom with sometimes up to 20 other families.

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Ross Reynolds speaks with film maker Don Sellers and Karen Matsumoto, the daughter of World War II hero Roy Matsumoto. 

Roy Matsumoto enlisted in the army to get out of a Japanese American internment camp. He went on to serve  as a translator for the Merrill’s Marauders behind enemy lines in the Burma and won a medal for outstanding bravery.

Courtesy of Kurt Erickson

For some soldiers, learning to live with physical injuries or post-deployment stress in a clinical setting is a less than conducive atmosphere for making progress.

Rivers of Recovery, a Minnesota based nonprofit group, uses a different approach:  They take soldiers out into the woods and teach them to fly fish. The aim is to provide counseling, camaraderie and self-care tools that soldiers can build on.

Nomi Prins' new book, "All the Presidents' Bankers"

In Nomi Prins' new book "All the Presidents' Bankers," she delves into over a century of close ties between the White House and Wall Street. Using archival correspondence, she explores the ways a small group of influential people, elected and not, has shaped American policy at home and abroad. The book details economic expansion, contraction and crises from the panic of 1907 to today, in the context of what Prins calls America’s genealogy of power.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Memorial Day is just one of many days throughout the year when the American flag is lowered to half-staff. The President of the United States and state governors can also order flags lowered during times of mourning.

In Washington state, flags have flown at half-staff three times so far in 2014 to honor local soldiers who died on active duty. In April, Governor Jay Inslee also ordered to lower the flags for a week in memory of the victims of the tragic Oso landslide.

Courtesy of Quinton Morris

He's only 36 years old, but violinist Quinton Morris has the kind of resume that would make anybody a little jealous.

Solo performance at Carnegie Hall? Check.

Oregon Latinos Face Bigger Problems With Alcohol

May 22, 2014

Compared to other Oregonians, a lot of Latinos in Oregon don't drink alcohol. Yet those who do drink face bigger problems. Some of the reasons are cultural.

The Idea Of A Better Future Keeps Teen Mom Going

May 22, 2014
Courtesy of Gabby Saechao

Gabby Saechao was in her first year of college when she heard those two dreaded words: “You’re pregnant.”

At first she was in denial, but there was no hiding it. "My mom knew straight away; she was really suspicious," Saechao said.

Today marks 100 years since Sun Ra was born — or, as the musician might have put it, since he arrived on Earth. An influential jazz composer, keyboardist and bandleader, Sun Ra always insisted he was just visiting this planet.

'Girl In The Road' Is A Dizzying Journey

May 22, 2014

Can you write about the future these days without it being apocalyptic? It's not clear whether Monica Byrne was trying to answer that question in her debut novel, The Girl in the Road — but she does it anyway. Taking place near the end of the 21st century in India and Africa — as well as on a high-tech bridge that spans the Indian Ocean between the two — the book isn't short on misery, tragedy or violence. It certainly isn't optimistic. At the same time, it gracefully dodges the apocalypse-mongering that's become all but de rigueur in near-future science fiction.

Meet the Posts — no relation to Emily and her rules of etiquette. The stressed family of New Yorkers in Emma Straub's breezy summer read, The Vacationers, are the kind of people who pack their troubles on top, for easiest access, when they head off on a trip together.

The supercomputers at the National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center have crunched long-term trends to produce an outlook for June, July and August. For most of the Northwest, the forecast gives a strong probability of above-normal temperatures.

Flickr Photo/BC Gov Photos

Steve Scher talks to Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the British Columbia Legislature's apology to Chinese Canadians. Nearly 100 laws, regulations and policies were passed and implemented from 1871 to the end of WWII that discriminated against Chinese immigrants in Canada.

Life Of A Sneakerhead: One To Rock, One To Stock

May 21, 2014
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Hieu Phan, 18, is a “sneakerhead” – he collects shoes that are rare and have trading value.

Phan remembers watching reruns of the Olympics with his dad when he was very young. When Michael Jordan was on the bench lacing up his sneakers in the second quarter, his shoes caught Phan's eyes. It was a special moment for him, but not as special as when he finally got his own pair of the same shoes Jordan had been wearing: Air Jordan Olympic 7.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

One of the first signs of spring is when the cherry trees bloom at the University of Washington. The iconic trees on the quad have become a symbol of the University’s ties to Japan. Yesterday, the University celebrated a gift from Japan — 18 new cherry trees to add to the campus.

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