arts & life

The Idea Of A Better Future Keeps Teen Mom Going

May 22, 2014
Courtesy of Gabby Saechao

Gabby Saechao was in her first year of college when she heard those two dreaded words: “You’re pregnant.”

At first she was in denial, but there was no hiding it. "My mom knew straight away; she was really suspicious," Saechao said.

Today marks 100 years since Sun Ra was born — or, as the musician might have put it, since he arrived on Earth. An influential jazz composer, keyboardist and bandleader, Sun Ra always insisted he was just visiting this planet.

'Girl In The Road' Is A Dizzying Journey

May 22, 2014

Can you write about the future these days without it being apocalyptic? It's not clear whether Monica Byrne was trying to answer that question in her debut novel, The Girl in the Road — but she does it anyway. Taking place near the end of the 21st century in India and Africa — as well as on a high-tech bridge that spans the Indian Ocean between the two — the book isn't short on misery, tragedy or violence. It certainly isn't optimistic. At the same time, it gracefully dodges the apocalypse-mongering that's become all but de rigueur in near-future science fiction.

Meet the Posts — no relation to Emily and her rules of etiquette. The stressed family of New Yorkers in Emma Straub's breezy summer read, The Vacationers, are the kind of people who pack their troubles on top, for easiest access, when they head off on a trip together.

The supercomputers at the National Weather Service's Climate Prediction Center have crunched long-term trends to produce an outlook for June, July and August. For most of the Northwest, the forecast gives a strong probability of above-normal temperatures.

John Jeffcoat, courtesy Matt Smith

Seattle's Capitol Hill neighborhood is hipster central these days: the place to go for the latest in music clubs, trendy restaurants and street style.

That wasn't always the case.

Flickr Photo/BC Gov Photos

Steve Scher talks to Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the British Columbia Legislature's apology to Chinese Canadians. Nearly 100 laws, regulations and policies were passed and implemented from 1871 to the end of WWII that discriminated against Chinese immigrants in Canada.

Life Of A Sneakerhead: One To Rock, One To Stock

May 21, 2014
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Hieu Phan, 18, is a “sneakerhead” – he collects shoes that are rare and have trading value.

Phan remembers watching reruns of the Olympics with his dad when he was very young. When Michael Jordan was on the bench lacing up his sneakers in the second quarter, his shoes caught Phan's eyes. It was a special moment for him, but not as special as when he finally got his own pair of the same shoes Jordan had been wearing: Air Jordan Olympic 7.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

One of the first signs of spring is when the cherry trees bloom at the University of Washington. The iconic trees on the quad have become a symbol of the University’s ties to Japan. Yesterday, the University celebrated a gift from Japan — 18 new cherry trees to add to the campus.

Over three days, the annual pilgrimage of 25,000 rollicking concertgoers to the Sasquatch Music Festival turns central Washington's picturesque Gorge Amphitheater along the Columbia River into the largest city in Grant County.

Flickr Photo/Wrote (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to John Miller, assistant executive director at the Washington Interscholastic Activities Association, about how research into risks associated with school sports is changing attitudes and activities in Washington state and beyond.

Flickr Photo/Bari Bookout (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks to University of Washington professor John Marzluff as he explains the best practices for dealing with crows during the spring “hatching season.” The birds can be particularly protective while their babies are learning to leave the nest. 

Nancy Pearl Picks For Books That Peddle Adventure

May 20, 2014
Flickr Photo/MorBCN

Steve Scher talks with "Book Lust" author Nancy Pearl about some books about biking that have put her in a traveling frame of mind.

KUOW Photo/Jenna Montgomery

Superstar architect Rem Koolhaas and his Rotterdam-based firm OMA almost didn't build Seattle's iconic downtown library building.

Post Updated 1:45 a.m. ET Tuesday:

Macklemore posted an apology on his website late Monday. He said he picked out items that he could use to disguise himself so he could move freely around an event. "I wasn't attempting to mimic any culture, nor resemble one. A 'Jewish stereotype' never crossed my mind," his post reads.

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