arts & life

Paul Morigi/AP Images for National Portrait Gallery

Marcie Sillman talks to Colleen McElroy and Jen Marlowe about the legacy and impact of Dr. Maya Angelou on their lives.

McElroy is a writer and lecturer emeritus at the University of Washington. Marlowe is a Seattle writer and activist.

David Guterson's book "Problems with People."

Ross Reynolds speaks with Bainbridge Island author David Guterson about his new collection of short stories "Problems with People," and the 2013 commencement speech Guterson gave at his alma mater, Roosevelt High School,  which drew boos from some in the audience.

The 'Thrill And Addiction' Of Seattle Graffiti Artists

May 28, 2014
Courtesy of Skeez

Seattle’s art scene spreads from music to visuals, from studio to street. Two artists that go by the names of Baso Fibonacci and Skeez are living in the shadows of the misunderstood graffiti and street art world. 

“It’s so much of a thrill and an addiction,” Skeez said. “Even back in high school I’d be running around tagging up the hallways and bathrooms at school because it was my human nature to have to do it.”

KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

You may have heard of financial literacy or media literacy. But what about health literacy: Are you able to get and understand basic health information?

Poet, performer and political activist Maya Angelou has died after a long illness at her home in Winston-Salem, N.C. She was 86. Born in St. Louis in 1928, Angelou grew up in a segregated society that she worked to change during the civil rights era. Angelou, who refused to speak for much of her childhood, revealed the scars of her past in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, the first of a series of memoirs.

Author Julia Glass Strives To Be A Good Ancestor

May 27, 2014

Marcie Sillman talks with award-winning author Julia Glass about her life as an artist, her hopes for the future and the characters she just can't seem to quit.

Ruth Reichl's book "Delicious!"

Marcie Sillman talks with author and former Gourmet Magazine editor-in-chief Ruth Reichl about her new foray into fiction.

'To Have A Place Where I Can Have Food'

May 27, 2014
KUOW Photo/Hannah Burn

The Census Bureau estimates Seattle grew faster than any other major American city last year. As more people move here, the pressure is on to find an affordable home.

Flickr Photo/hapal (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Norma Rosenthal and Toby Donner about the joys and pitfalls of caring for aging parents. They share their own experiences on the blog "Girlfriends With Aging Parents."

Andrew Solomon's book "Far from the Tree."

Steve Scher interviews everyone's favorite librarian, Nancy Pearl, about Andrew Solomon's “Far From The Tree: Parents Children and The Search For Identity.” She calls it an important book about parents who have to learn to accept their different, difficult and sometimes very troubled children.

For a journey of a different kind, she also recommends the graphic novel “Shackleton: Antarctic Odyssey,” by Nick Bertozzi.

Washington's state Department of Health is expecting a rush when an adoption law change takes effect on July 1.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

You know it's the start of the fishing season at Fishermen's Terminal in Seattle when a familiar smell is in the air: coconut-scented sunscreen.

The Alaska salmon fishing season is about to start its 100th year in operation out of Fishermen’s Terminal in the Interbay area of Seattle.

When Nikita Khrushchev emerged as the leader of the Soviet Union after Stalin's death in 1953, one of the first things he addressed was the housing shortage and the need for more food. At the time, thousands of people were living in cramped communal apartments, sharing one kitchen and one bathroom with sometimes up to 20 other families.

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Ross Reynolds speaks with film maker Don Sellers and Karen Matsumoto, the daughter of World War II hero Roy Matsumoto. 

Roy Matsumoto enlisted in the army to get out of a Japanese American internment camp. He went on to serve  as a translator for the Merrill’s Marauders behind enemy lines in the Burma and won a medal for outstanding bravery.

Courtesy of Kurt Erickson

For some soldiers, learning to live with physical injuries or post-deployment stress in a clinical setting is a less than conducive atmosphere for making progress.

Rivers of Recovery, a Minnesota based nonprofit group, uses a different approach:  They take soldiers out into the woods and teach them to fly fish. The aim is to provide counseling, camaraderie and self-care tools that soldiers can build on.

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