arts & life | KUOW News and Information

arts & life

Credit Seattle Rep Theatre

Jerry Manning, the artistic leader of Seattle Repertory Theatre, died suddenly on Wednesday following complications from a routine surgery in March, according to a news release from the theater. He was 58.

Joel Migdal's book "Shifting Sands."

Steve Scher talks to University of Washington professor Joel Migdal about his new book "Shifting Sands: The United States and The Middle East."

Flickr Photo/~C4Chaos

Matthew Richter has his dream job. For the past eight months, he has served as Seattle's Cultural Spaces Liaison. But when you ask him to tell you what a cultural space is, he laughs.

"That's the million dollar question,” Richter said. “It's like pornography (you know it when you see it)."

Flickr Photo/Marco Verch (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Microsoft may have found a way to pull ahead of the Sony Playstation — in China.

The company partnered this week with a Chinese company to bring its Xbox One gaming console out of the black market and into Chinese stores.

'Wish You Happy Forever' With Jenny Bowen

May 1, 2014
Jenny Bowen's book "Wish You Happy Forever."

In 1996 Jenny Bowen was in Los Angeles living a comfortable and, she said, not very meaningful existence.

Reading the New York Times one Saturday morning, she and her husband were disturbed by a photo of a little girl in a Chinese orphanage. Bowen’s determination to do something about what she’d seen would change her life, and ultimately the lives of orphans across China.

Bowen founded the organization Half the Sky to better the lives of orphan children living in China’s welfare institutions. Half the Sky operates programs for orphans from birth to adulthood.

All offer loving care, stimulation, education, all the kinds of things a child who lives in a family may have. The Chinese government has invited Half the Sky to train every child welfare worker in the country.

Jenny Bowen spoke at Town Hall Seattle on April 1. She is also the author of a book, "Wish You Happy Forever."

While sports fan in the U.S. have been focused this week on the Donald Sterling scandal, European soccer fans have been talking about another racial incident. At a match between FC Barcelona (popularly known as Barça) and Villareal CF in Spain this past weekend, Brazilian player Dani Alves was setting up to take a corner kick when a banana, thrown by a fan, landed in front of him on the pitch. (You know, because racist taunts are never subtle.)

The great outdoors is a perennial theme in classical music, usually expressed through bucolic or picturesque works. But the Seattle Symphony knew that to appear on Spring for Music — an annual festival of adventurous programming by North American orchestras — it required a more unusual, daring take on this theme.

A family-owned sporting goods company in suburban Seattle is confronting the tension between honoring tradition and embracing innovation in the sport of baseball.

Murray Carpenter's book, "Caffeinated."

Ross Reynolds speaks with journalist Murray Carpenter about his book, “Caffeinated: How Our Daily Habit Helps, Hurts, and Hooks Us."

The book takes a closer look at the common drug we take for granted on a daily basis.

Flickr Photo/One America (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Juan Jose Bocanegra, chairman of the May First Action Coalition, about the annual May Day march for immigration reform.

For centuries, hard apple cider has been made with the fermented juice of apples — nothing more, nothing less. And a lot of cider drinkers and makers — let's call them purists — like it that way.

But a new wave of renegade cider makers in America is shirking tradition and adding unusual ingredients to the fermentation tank — from chocolate and tropical fruit juices to herbs, chili peppers and unusual yeasts. Their aim — which is controversial among the purists — is to bring out the best, or just the weirdest, flavors in the ciders.

Doug Fine's book, "Hemp Bound."

Ross Reynolds speaks with Doug Fine, a self-described comedic investigative journalist, about his new book, "Hemp Bound: Dispatches from the Front Lines of the Next Agricultural Revolution."

Fine spoke with scientists and farmers around the world about how hemp is used. In February, President Obama signed the Farm Bill, which allows industrial research on hemp.

Flickr Photo/David Jones (CC BY-NC-ND)

On Tuesday, NBA Commissioner Adam Silver ordered that Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling be banned from the team and the NBA for life. The announcement came after Sterling's racist remarks were made public in a secretly taped recording.

Flickr Photo/Eric E Johnson (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde finds our more about a plan by Seattle & King County Public Health to make restaurant health inspection results more visible with Becky Elias, who runs the food protection program.

Flickr Photo/Ricky Montalvo (Cc-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Ira Glass, host of This American Life, about his career and the art of radio storytelling.

Pregnant women have heard it time and time again: What you eat during those nine months can have long-term effects on your child's health.

Heck, one study even found that when pregnant women eat a diverse diet, the resulting babies are less picky in the foods they choose.

So what about mom's eating habits before she even knows she's pregnant?

Bearing messages ranging from the inspiring to the insipid, "love locks" can be found clamped onto bridges in major cities around the world. But no place has it worse than Paris, where the padlocks cover old bridges in a kind of urban barnacle, climbing up every free surface.

Take the Pont des Arts, Paris' most famous footbridge across the Seine river. Hundreds of thousands of padlocks cover its old iron railings; the light of day barely passes through them.

The Five Hardest Minutes Working The Mudslide

Apr 29, 2014
KUOW Photo/Ashley Ahearn

The Oso mudslide drew hundreds of volunteers to the towns of Arlington and Darrington, Wash.

Mixed in among those responders were 50 young people in the Washington Conservation Corps between the ages of 18 and 25.

Update: The NAACP issued a press release on Thursday advising that Leon Jenkins has resigned his post as president of the Los Angeles chapter. The national organization said it is "developing guidelines for its branches to help them in their award selection process."

"The Los Angeles NAACP intention to honor Mr. Sterling for a lifetime body of work must be withdrawn, and the donation that he's given to the Los Angeles NAACP will be returned."

The Atlanta-based rapper named Future has become an influential figure in hip-hop and pop over the last couple of years, writing songs for Rihanna and Ciara, and landing guest spots from Miley Cyrus, Pharrell and Drake. Just before he put out his brand new album, titled Honest, he spoke with Frannie Kelley and Ali Shaheed Muhammad, the hosts of NPR Music's Microphone Check, about standing out from the crowd and his apprenticeship with Atlanta's long-standing Dungeon Family.

The Tony nominations are out, and it was a good year to be playing eight people at the same time.

Billie Holiday will not be singing unless she "feels it." That's practically her thesis statement in Lady Day at Emerson's Bar and Grill, Lanie Robertson's play about a drug-ravaged nightclub show near the end of Holiday's tortured life. War stories and bawdy jokes are never a problem — and neither is pouring a drink — but if the audience wants a show, they have to wait until Lady Day can give them something real.

Duke Ellington didn't consider himself a jazz musician.

He said he was a musician who played jazz. And what a musician: pianist, bandleader, composer of more than 1,000 songs including standards like "Don't Get Around Much Anymore," "It Don't Mean a Thing (If It Ain't Got That Swing)," "Satin Doll" and "Sophisticated Lady."

Astra Taylor's book, "The People’s Platform."

Ross Reynolds speaks with writer and filmmaker Astra Taylor about how the Internet has become a victim of its own success. She is the author of "The People’s Platform: Taking Back Power and Culture in the Digital Age."

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

There’s no special handshake. No code word. But for one secret group on the University of Washington campus in Seattle, identification papers – or, rather, a lack thereof – are a common denomination.

The UW’s student organization the Purple Group is for students, known as "dreamers," who came to the country illegally, often as young children.

Saying the Seattle Seahawks kept San Francisco 49ers fans from being able to pull for their team in January's NFC title game, a 49ers fan is suing the NFL, claiming the practice of limiting ticket sales to pro-Seahawks markets amounts to "economic discrimination." He is seeking $50 million in damages.

As hosts of the playoff game, the Seahawks limited credit-card sales of tickets to accounts with billing addresses in a list of nearby states. California wasn't on that list, which included parts of Canada and Hawaii. As a resident of Nevada, John E. Williams III was shut out.

Turning The Tacoma Dome Into Public Art

Apr 25, 2014
Rendering of what one of the Andy Warhol flowers would look like on the Tacoma Dome.
City of Tacoma/Amy McBride

Marcie Sillman checks in with Tacoma Arts Administrator Amy McBride about the city's endeavor to turn the Tacoma Dome into a large flower designed by Andy Warhol.

Flickr Photo/Rupert Taylor-Price (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Sherpa senior guide Lakpa Rita Sherpa about the avalanche that killed five of his men on Mount Everest last Friday. Lakpa is also the leader of an expedition from Alpine Ascents International.

Sillman also talks with David Morton, a mountaineer who has started the Juniper Fund to help Sherpas who are injured or killed on the job.

The deadly avalanche on April 18 killed 16 men.

From Nigeria To Middle America: Optimism Spans Continents In Mengestu's Book

Apr 25, 2014
Dinaw Mengestu's book, "All Our Names."

Steve Scher sits down with 2012 MacArthur Genius Grant recipient and writer Dinaw Mengestu to talk about his newest book, "All Our Names."

Why Do You Love The Books You Love?

Apr 25, 2014
Flickr Photo/Silke Gerstenkorn (CC BY-NC-ND)

Think of your favorite book. What is it about that book that makes you love it? Is it the eloquence of the sentences? The adrenaline of the story? Characters that seem so real they could be friends? A setting that sweeps you away?

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