arts & life | KUOW News and Information

arts & life

Nancy Pearl Finds Library Passion In Pictures

May 13, 2014
Flickr Photo/B Gallatin (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks to book hugger Nancy Pearl about a book that shares her passion for libraries. Also, she re-introduces us to an author she considers one of the best to ever put pen to paper.  

Fourth-graders at Schmitz Park Elementary in West Seattle play capture the flag in their outdoor P.E. class.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

At a playfield in West Seattle, physical education teacher C.J. Sealey referees with a piercing whistle. Sealey aims to get these kids moving – after all, state law demands that elementary and middle school students get at least 100 minutes of P.E. every week.

In an old hunting lodge on the grounds of an ancient Norman castle in Abergavenny, Wales, a small, extinct dog peers out of a handmade wooden display case.

"Whiskey is the last surviving specimen of a turnspit dog, albeit stuffed," says Sally Davis, longtime custodian at the Abergavenny Museum.

The Canis vertigus, or turnspit, was an essential part of every large kitchen in Britain in the 16th century. The small cooking canine was bred to run in a wheel that turned a roasting spit in cavernous kitchen fireplaces.

AP Photo/Michael Conroy

Ross Reynolds talks with Dave Zirin, sports editor at The Nation, about Michael Sam — the first openly gay football player to be drafted by a National Football League team.

KUOW Photo/Kara McDermott

Steve Scher talks with Seabury Blair Jr., a local author of hiking books, about where to go in the Cascades and on the Olympic Penninsula when you get an itching to head for the hills.

Blair is author of Day Hike! Olympic Peninsula, part of the Day Hikes! series of books from Sasquatch Press.

Photo Courtesy Jenni Clark

Not all health plans are the same, as Washington consumers have learned the hard way.

Louis C.K. has made a career in comedy by going places others won't. He can be shockingly crude and deeply insightful in the same sentence.

In his Emmy-award winning TV show called Louie, the comedian basically plays himself — a divorced standup comic in New York with two kids. Season 4 of the show kicked off last week.

Louie is "right where I started him, really," he tells NPR's Rachel Martin. "Some stuff happened, but he ended up back where he was, which sort of is the way things work. It's a zero-sum game, at times."

Each week, Weekend Edition Sunday host Rachel Martin brings listeners an unexpected side of the news by talking with someone personally affected by the stories making headlines.

For decades Marie Collins has advocated on behalf of sex abuse victims and spoken out against the way the Catholic Church has handled the crisis.

Collins was selected by Pope Francis to sit on the new commission he set up to try to right past wrongs and to make recommendations for dealing with pedophile priests in the future.

Cruise season has begun in the Pacific Northwest with the arrival of gleaming cruise ships. They'll be steaming back-and-forth to Alaska all summer from Vancouver and Seattle.

Rod Hatfield

Did you know there are bees at Sea-Tac Airport? Twenty beehives are already in place in green space around the airport. And tonight, a two-day hackathon gets going that’s centered around the idea of bees and flight. It’s connected to a new art installment that’s going in at Sea-Tac: “Flight Path.”

Seattleites Share Fond Mom Stories

May 9, 2014
Flickr Photo/Dr Case (CC-BY-NC-ND)

In honor of Mother's Day, we sent Producer Posey Gruener to Green Lake Park in Seattle to gather fond recollections of moms.

AP Photo/Joel Ryan

David Hyde talks to Ed Catmull, the co-founder of Pixar Animation Studios and president of Pixar and Disney animation, about managing creative people and his new book "Creativity Inc: Overcoming The Unseen Forces That Stand In The Way Of True Inspiration."

Flickr Photo/Jeremy Reding (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jennifer Wielund, public space program manager at the Seattle Department of Transportation, about the crop of a dozen new pilot parklets which will appear in parking spaces across the city this summer.

The Misunderstood Fans Of 'My Little Pony'

May 9, 2014
Courtesy of Everfree NW/Benjamin Ruby

In an unforgiving world, who wouldn’t want to retreat to a place where friendship is magic? Bronies are a group of people who live by that. They’re fans of the newest version of  the children's show, My Little Pony. RadioActive youth producer Chris Otey introduces us to some members of the local herd of bronies.

My Little Pony was a TV show for little girls that first appeared in the 1980s. And you might think that 2012’s revamped version, My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, is also just a show for little girls. But it’s grown into something a little different. And that has created a following of people who have aptly been named “bronies.”

I am one of them.

KUOW Photo/Steve Scher

Steve Scher visits the Phinney Neighborhood Association's tool library with home repair guru Roger  Faris and head librarian Mike Broili.

Flickr Photo/Vikalpa

At 22, Joshua Roman became the Seattle Symphony's youngest-ever principal cellist. With his mop of curly brown hair and his baby face, Roman was a distinctive presence at Benaroya Hall.

But just two years after the young musician took up his post, Roman decided to leave the orchestra to carve out his own career as a concert performer.

Paul Taylor's book "The Next America."

Ross Reynolds talks with Paul Taylor, president of the Pew Research Center about his new book, ‘The Next America."

From Wikipedia

Almost every partner dance is a descendant of the waltz.

The oldest of ballroom dances, the waltz has roots as far back as the 13th century. As it evolved and entered the ballrooms of Europe, the waltz was viewed as taboo because partners were permitted to make contact. But like the tango and other exciting and challenging dances, the waltz spread until by the middle of the nineteenth century it was firmly established in the U.S.

Today’s standard waltz rhythm that we now know and love became popular due to the musical creations of composers such as Johann Strauss.

Marijuana plants growing at Seattle's first legal pot farm, Sea of Green.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Sea of Green Farms sits south of Ballard, just east of Fisherman’s Terminal.

Barbara Ehrenreich Talks 'Living With A Wild God'

May 8, 2014
Barbara Ehrenreich's book "Living With a Wild God."

Barbara Ehrenreich is a journalist and activist known for her wry, acerbic, probing and prolific writings. She writes essays and articles related to social injustice and books on subjects she says don’t make money but fascinate her.

In 2001, Ehrenreich was undergoing breast cancer treatment and putting her papers in order simultaneously. She calls the timing “viciously appropriate.”

Among the many boxes from a lifetime of writing she re-discovered a journal she’d kept as an adolescent. Moved by the questions she found there — "Why are we here? What’s going on in the universe? What is all this about?" — she promised to try to better understand her youthful experience if she recovered.

The result is her latest book, "Living with a Wild God: A Nonbeliever’s Search for the Truth about Everything." She calls it a “sort of philosophical memoir, or a metaphysical thriller.”

Ehrenreich spoke with KUOW’s Marcie Sillman at Town Hall Seattle on April 21.

Flickr Photo/Barack Obama (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks to Syracuse University professor, Robert Thompson about what politicians get out of prime time cameos. First Lady Michelle Obama will appear on the television show Nashville tonight, and there is a long history of political figures hitting their mark in prime time.

The only people inhaling at Seattle Symphony concerts will be the wind-instrument players. The Symphony says it has no plans to follow the lead of the Colorado Symphony and hold marijuana-friendly concerts.

There are 46 million poor people in the U.S., and millions more hover right above the poverty line — but go into many of their homes, and you might find a flat-screen TV, a computer or the latest sneakers.

And that raises a question: What does it mean to be poor in America today?

Arlo Crawford's book "A Farm Dies Once a Year."

Arlo Crawford never wanted to be a farmer like his parents. But that changed one spring. He shares his experience from the office back to the fields with KUOW's Marcie Sillman.

Crawford's parents were part of the back-to-the-land generation of the 1970s. Crawford's father dropped out of law school and bought land in southern Pennsylvania. That land became New Morning organic farm, and that's where Crawford and his sister Janie grew up.

 Billy Frank Jr., a legendary champion of tribal treaty rights and Northwest salmon restoration, died Monday. He was 83 years old.

KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Hey mamas!

I'm thinking about putting together a slideshow of spaces where women work. As many of you know, federal law requires that workplaces make space for women to pump — but what that space looks like varies wildly.

Flickr Photo/Lee Davenport (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Molly Wizenberg, author of the popular food blog Orangette, has a new book out this week detailing the far-fetched beginnings of Delancey, the restaurant she shares with husband Brandon Pettit.

On Orangette, Wizenberg said she met her husband through her blog. Early in their relationship, she told KUOW’s Ross Reynolds, Pettit was a trained musician in a Ph.D. program for musical composition.

The federal government is already predicting this fire season will push firefighting resources almost $500 million over budget.

Book Hugger Nancy Pearl Revists Old Favorites

May 2, 2014
Flickr Photo/Quinn Dombrowski (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Nancy Pearl about the books she has been re-reading lately, including Reif Larsen's "The Selected Works of T.S. Spivett," and David Lodge's "The Campus Trilogy."

Oregon State University (OSU) Press

Ross Reynolds speaks with Bonnie Henderson about her new book "The Next Tsunami: Living on a Restless Coast."

Just off the coast of Washington and Oregon is a fault line with potential to unleash an earthquake larger than the deadly magnitude 9 Japan quake in 2011 that triggered a tsunami.

Henderson tells the story about how geologists learned of the Cascadia Subduction Zone and how public officials have tried to adopt safety measures.

Spoiler alert: when you hear a siren, walk and keep walking.

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