arts & life

Author Interview
11:26 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Jonathan Lethem's "Dissident Gardens"

Jonathan Lethem's book "Dissident Gardens."

Jonathan Lethem is one of America’s finest novelists. His critically acclaimed books include "Motherless Brooklyn," which won the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction, "Fortress of Solitude" and “Chronic City."

Lethem’s nonfiction work includes a long interview with Bob Dylan and a marvelous profile of James Brown, both for Rolling Stone magazine. Lethem’s latest novel "Dissident Gardens" is about American Communists and leftists. 

The human impulse to throw yourself into history with an attitude that it could matter, that you can change things and that you'll sacrifice for this, is very universal. It's an impulse that becomes misused or betrayed or conflicted in so many different ways, and this book becomes a catalog of all those different kinds of disappointment. — Lethem

Ross Reynolds talks to Lethem about his latest novel, writing, politics and music.

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Tech Industry
1:00 am
Fri September 20, 2013

Seattle Is The Wild West Of Game Design

A sculpture inside DigiPen beckoning viewers to the interactive media industry.
KUOW Photo/Jamala Henderson

One reason the Puget Sound region stayed stronger than some surrounding areas during the economic downturn is because of its tech industry. A particular bright spot is the computer gaming and interactive media industry.

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Food's Future
8:00 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

The Future Of Food With Vandana Shiva

Flickr Photo/Elevate Festival

What is the future of food? How can it sustain us? Vandana Shiva is an environmental and anti-globalization activist. Throughout her career, she’s fought for changes in agriculture practices, among other causes. Her latest book is called “Making Peace with the Earth.” She spoke at Town Hall on September 12, 2013, in a talk sponsored by YES! Magazine.

Seattle Sounders FC
2:20 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

Kasey Keller Talks Sounders Past And Future

Former Seattle Sounders FC goalie turned broadcaster Kasey Keller.
Flickr Photo/Noelle Noble

Those who have been following the US and Seattle soccer scene for a while are familiar with Olympia-born Kasey Keller. He has been to the World Cup four times as a goalkeeper for the United States Men's National Team and played extensively in international leagues.

Back in 2008, Keller returned to where he started to play for the Seattle Sounders. He is now one of the voices of the Sounders, announcing games with Ross Fletcher. Keller joins us to talk soccer and the Sounders' performance this year.

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Recession Recovery
2:04 pm
Thu September 19, 2013

"Statistically Insignificant" Wage And Poverty Numbers Tell A Larger Story

A view of Smith Tower from Yesler Terrace, circa 1960.
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives

The US Census Bureau released numbers this week looking at poverty rates and wages across the US in 2012. Our local numbers reflect what’s happening around the country: the number of people living in poverty has stagnated and wages have stayed about the same.

At first glance, this may seem like good news, or even non-news. But the census numbers reveal a larger picture of what’s happening in the wake of the recession: that people in low and middle income brackets aren’t really experiencing a recovery.

Jennifer Romich is the director of the West Coast Poverty Center and an associate professor at the UW School of Social Work. She told KUOW's Marcie Sillman the "statistically insignificant" numbers from the Census Bureau paint a concerning picture of many people that are unable to get ahead financially.

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Business Of Sports
11:12 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Seattle Mariners Owner Dies, Could The Team Be Sold?

Mariners' majority owner Hiroshi Yamauchi.
AP Photo/Katsumi Kasahara

The majority owner of the Seattle Mariners, Hiroshi Yamauchi has died in Japan at the age of 85. The former Nintendo President never watched a Mariners game in person, but he’s credited by many for saving baseball in Seattle when he purchased the team in 1992.

What’s his legacy? And what does his death mean for the Mariners organization moving forward? Geoff Baker covers the Mariners for The Seattle Times. He talked with Marcie Sillman.

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Violence In Gaming
10:36 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Does The Gaming World Welcome Women?

A contestant at Paris Games Week 2012.
Flickr Photo/James Cao

One of the most successful video games in history, Grand Theft Auto, released their latest version on Tuesday. It made $800 million in 24 hours. Grand Theft Auto is known for heavy violence, drugs and sex - beating up women prostitutes is regular part of the game. And this latest release, Grand Theft Auto V, is just as raunchy as expected. But this time, some female gamers aren't buying. Jezebel's night editor, Laura Beck, is one of them. Ross Reynolds talks with Beck about why she won't play Grand Theft Auto V.

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Gaming
10:24 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Grand Theft Auto V: The Last Big Console Release?

Credit Rock Star Games/Grand Theft Auto

Grand Theft Auto released its latest version on Tuesday. It made $800 million in one day. But even though this release is causing a frenzy, console games are facing tough times. The rise of tablet and mobile gaming has brought fierce competition. Ross Reynolds talks with Bloomberg Businessweek writer, Joshua Brustein about the future of console gaming.

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DASSdance's New Production
10:11 am
Thu September 19, 2013

Seattle Dance Company Inspired By Amazon Tribe

The dancers of DASSdance's new piece, "Tale of Ten Green."
From DASSdance's Facebook page.

Artists are inspired by all sorts of things: a song, an image or a story they want to tell. Choreographer Daniel Wilkins and his company, DASSdance, will premier a new work this weekend, “Tale of Ten Green.”

It springs from the story of the Awa people, an indigenous tribe that lives in Brazil’s Amazon River basin. The Awa haven’t had significant contact with the outside world until recently, and according to Wilkins, the experience has been both violent and exploitative.

“Tale of Ten Green” premiers Friday evening at Seattle’s Washington Hall. 

Dungeons & Dragons
9:28 am
Thu September 19, 2013

David Ewalt On Role-Playing Games In American Culture

David Ewalt's book "Of Dice And Men"

Since gaining popularity in the 1970s, the role-playing game Dungeons & Dragons has been a part of American culture.  Journalist David Ewalt investigates why this particular game has remained popular and culturally influential.

He began playing the game when he was 10 years old.  Now he’s an award winning journalist who writes about games for Forbes magazine.  His new book is “Of Dice and Men: The Story of Dungeons & Dragons and the People Who Play It.”

Reaction To Syria
4:37 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

The Interfaith Amigos On Violence

The Interfaith Amigos.
Flickr Photo/University of Denver

Imam Jamal Rahman, Rabbi Ted Falcon and Pastor Don Mackenzie came together just after the Iraq War began.  They wanted to find a way to discuss politics and faith and to use their religious convictions to forge a path to dialogue and eventually peace.

The Amigos were originally going to be in studio to discuss the subject of compassion and consciousness, but the unfolding events in Syria hijacked our conversation. We talked about whether President Obama’s original proposal to launch a military attack in retaliation for Syria’s use of chemical weapons was the right way forward on this issues.

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Speech Disorder
4:12 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Tic Talk: A Young Boy Unloads His Thoughts About Living With Tourette Syndrome

Spencer and Cristina Parry
KCRW

Spencer is a normal nine-year-old boy, except for one thing: he has Tourette syndrome. His mother and father, Hayley and Richard, have been searching desperately for answers as his twitching and inappropriate yelling continue to increase.

For the sake of Spencer and his little brother, Lewis, they try to keep family life normal. This is their story.

Warning: contains strong language.

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International News
2:46 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

The News From Canada: Quebec's Religious Symbols Ban

Flickr Photo/Elvert Barnes

In Canada, Quebec's separatist government has attempted to ban public servants from wearing religious symbols while at work. That includes everything from crosses to face coverings. Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer has been following the story. He talks with Marcie Sillman about why the issue has so many people upset. Plus, what Neil Young said to get his music banned from at least one Alberta radio station.

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End Of Life Planning
2:08 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Is There Such A Thing As A Good Death?

Katy Butler's book "Knocking on Heaven's Door."

When Katy Butler’s father had a major stroke the family had a lot of medical options, except the one they most wanted: a humane and timely death. David Hyde speaks with Katy Butler about her new book, "Knocking On Heaven’s Door: The Path To A Better Way Of Death."

Eating Local
1:54 pm
Wed September 18, 2013

Getting Fresh With Ross And Sheryl: The Rainbow of Tomatoes

Flickr Photo/The Ewan

Sheryl Wiser of Cascade Harvest is always in season with her recommendations on what to buy at the farmers market and how to cook it. This week we hear about varieties of garlic and tomatoes.

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