arts & life | KUOW News and Information

arts & life

Seattle Storm playing Washington Mystics
Flickr/Ronald Woan

The King County Council and Seattle City Council have approved the new arena deal to bring NBA and NHL teams to Seattle.

But what about the Seattle Storm?

Will they move to Chris Hansen’s new arena in Sodo, or will they continue to call Key Arena home? Ross talks to Seattle Storm president and CEO Karen Bryant.

Online Poker
Flickr/John Seb Barber

A Federal District Court in Brooklyn has ruled that poker is more a game of skill than of chance. The decision overturned the conviction of a man who operated a backroom poker game. 

Legal experts say it could effect laws that currently ban online poker. Joining us is an economist and poker player who testified in the case, Randal Heeb.

Dan Savage
Flickr/Better Than Bacon

Mark Oppenheimer has written extensively about both sides of the gay marriage argument, and in August he moderated The Dinner Table Debate between Dan Savage and Brian Brown. Now he has self-published a short biography on Dan Savage in e-book format, titled “Dan Savage: The First Gay Celebrity.” He joins Ross to talk about Dan Savage, gay marriage, and self-publishing.

Greendays Gardening

Oct 16, 2012
(Photo/Marty Wingate)

Weekday green thumbs Marty Wingate, Willi Galloway and Greg Rabourn join us to answer your flower, vegetable and native plant questions. Need guidance for your garden? Call us at 206.543.5869 or email weekday@kuow.org.

Ascent of the A-Word
(Credit/PublicAffairs)

In “Ascent of the A-Word,” linguist and "Fresh Air" commentator Geoffrey Nunberg considers a word that has divided, offended and fascinated its users for the last 60 years. What is its essence? And what does it say about our values, impressions and relationships with other people? Nunberg joins us to discuss one of the culture’s most commonly hurled vulgarities and its place in society.

ACT's "Ramayana"
ACT Photo/Copyright LaRae Lobdell

“The Ramayana” is a sacred text for millions of Hindus.  Now Seattle’s ACT Theatre has adapted the epic saga of good and evil for the stage.  Playwrights Yussef El-Guindi and Stephanie Timm used an English translation of the original Sanskrit, and synthesized 24,000 verses into three hours of theater.

"The Blue Room"
Courtesy Centre Pompidou, Paris

Nobody would argue over the fact that women have made significant contributions to the art world.  But a major new exhibition at Seattle Art Museum not only highlights contemporary women artists; it puts them front and center. 

To the world, Richard was Washington state’s Most Wanted, a thief and a murderer. But Richard’s chaplain Chris didn’t see him that way. To Chris, Richard was a sweet, well-meaning man who just wanted to be seen. Chris tells his story today.

Other stories from KUOW Presents:

Home Repair With Roger Faris

Oct 15, 2012
Toolbox
(Flickr photo/Gordon Ross)

Need a hand with a do-it-yourself home improvement project? Our home repair expert Roger Faris is here to answer your questions. Call us at 206.543.5869 or weekday@kuow.org.

Also this hour, we speak with attorney David Mann. He’s representing Seattle longshoremen and warehouse workers who say they’ll file a lawsuit to block a third sports arena in Sodo. Plus, we hear a poem from Dean Young and take a listen back to some of our interview with satirist Christopher Buckley (“They Eat Puppies, Don’t They?”).

(Photo: Lara Hamilton)

Lara Hamilton was about to turn 40 when she realized she wanted to quit her job. She worried about losing a steady paycheck, but she really wanted to find work she loved. She found the courage to act from a surprising source: Julia Child. Lara tells KUOW's Jeannie Yandel how Julia helped her then, and now.

Other stories from KUOW Presents:

Elaine Brown. Image courtesy of Pat Thomas.
(Image courtesy of Pat Thomas)

Local record producer and writer Pat Thomas recently compiled a collection of music written by and for the Black Power movement,  "Listen, Whitey! The Sounds of Black Power 1965–1975." One of the musicians he discovered in putting the album together is a woman named Elaine Brown. She was the head of the Black Panther party during the mid '70s. Today, she's most well known for her activism for prisoners, but Pat thinks her music from the late '60s and early '70s has a message that still applies today.  He recommends listening to "Seize The Time," "The End of Silence" and "Until We're Free."

Who Is Rick Steves?

Oct 11, 2012
Jen Nance, Office of the Mayor / Flickr

Travel guru Rick Steves has made his way into many a knapsack with his essential travel guides, but how did he first begin his travel business and what inspired that career? Ross Reynolds sits down with Rick Steves and goes beyond travel to hear his story. 

Seattle is one of the whitest cities in the country according to the most recent census. But what does that mean? What's it like to live in such a white city? We talk to you about the latest figures.

Self-Reflection Through Scottish Buddhism

Oct 10, 2012
Writer Jay Craig
(Ballard Writers Collective Photo/Peggy Sturdivant)

Seattle writer Jay Craig created his own religion. Its rules helped him deal with his bipolar disorder, and he thought it was good enough to overthrow Christianity. But when a close friend ended up in a mental institution claiming to be the daughter of God, Jay was forced to take a good, hard look at himself.

Other stories from KUOW Presents

Brenda Peterson: Finding Common Ground

Oct 9, 2012
KUOW's Dave Beck and author Brenda Peterson
(Photo: Robin Lindsey)

It's sometimes difficult to engage in conversation with people whose beliefs are very different from your own. But Brenda Peterson, a West Seattle author and environmentalist, has found a place on a local beach where she can have those conversations. It's a sanctuary for Brenda where she finds connection with creatures of all kinds. And it's the place where she founded the nonprofit Seal Sitters a few years ago.

Seal Sitters is a volunteer organization that watches after seal pups that show up on Puget Sound beaches. Brenda Peterson speaks with KUOW's Dave Beck. Her new children's book, based on her experiences with Seal Sitters, is called "Leopard and Silkie."

Other stories from KUOW Presents:

Wikipedia/public domain

The University of Washington is a respected institution of higher learning, serving more than 92,000 students on campuses in Seattle, Bothell and Tacoma. But it didn’t quite start out this way; in its first 25 years, the school went broke and even shut down for a brief time. It barely had enough students and faculty to fill a large room.

Seattle native and MC Macklemore and producer Ryan Lewis sit down with Ross Reynolds to discuss their careers, upcoming album and involvement with Washington’s pro same-sex marriage campaign. 

Ira Glass On The Future Of Radio

Oct 4, 2012
(AP Photo/Showtime, Monty Brinton)

With NPR’s popular Car Talk hosts retiring, public radio approaches a crossroads. Which way to go? Hit the archives to keep popular programs on the air, or create more new shows? The creator and host of This American Life has some ideas. We talk with Ira Glass about the present and future of public radio.

Is gender inequity the biggest issue of our time? Around the world, it’s not unusual for young girls from poor families to be kept out of school. In India, the mortality rate for girls under age five is 50 percent higher than it is for boys. Pulitzer Prize–winning author of “Half the Sky” Sheryl WuDunn talked with us earlier this year about education, poverty, maternal mortality, sex trafficking and gender inequality, and what can be done to help.

FOUND Magazine’s Davy Rothbart

Oct 3, 2012

FOUND Magazine creator and This American Life contributor Davy Rothbart joins us to talk about 10 years of FOUND and his new collection of essays, "My Heart Is An Idiot." Then, Marcie Sillman speaks with choreographer Amy O’Neal about her new solo performance at Velocity Dance Center.

Steven Bender is a law professor at Seattle University. He writes about the policies and issues involving Mexican–Americans. And, he’s also kind of obsessed with deconstructing popular culture messages about the lives and experiences of Latinos, because he’s seen a lot of negative stereotypes. Professor Bender talked with KUOW's Jamala Henderson about watching three films that present a more nuanced portrayal of Mexicans and the Mexican–American experience.

Cheech and Chong, "Born in East LA"

Actor And Storyteller Stephen Tobolowsky

Oct 2, 2012
Stephen Tobolowsky and Steve Scher
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Character actor Stephen Tobolowsky is well-known for his roles as Ned Ryerson in "Groundhog Day" and Sandy Ryerson in TV’s "Glee."  Lately, he’s become highly regarded as a storyteller for his podcast and radio show The Tobolowsky Files, and a new book, "The Dangerous Animals Club." Stephen Tobolowsky joins us.

Sounds Familiar: Chopin's 'Funeral March'

Oct 2, 2012

KUOW Swing Years Host Amanda Wilde digs into the history behind the songs that sound familiar. This time out, we explore Chopin's “Funeral March.” Since it first appeared in the early 19th century, the famous tune has found its way into movies, cartoons, and funk and hip–hop music.  Amanda Wilde traces the lineage of Chopin's “Funeral March” with KUOW's Dave Beck. 

Wikipedia photo/unknown

For most of the 20th century, luxury travel meant train travel. And if you were lucky enough to afford it, you spent the night in a private Pullman sleeping car.

A Conversation With Dave Matthews

Oct 2, 2012
(Photo/Cifo aka Big Cif)

Musician Dave Matthews has a new album called “Away From The World.” He's just home from tour and joins us to muse on everything from the upcoming presidential election to avoiding wheat. Tune in for an off-the-cuff conversation between Dave and Steve, and pledge your support for KUOW.

Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

Many of us pass along books we love to family and friends. If you could only pass along one book — one you truly love — which book would it be? Librarian Nancy Pearl gives Weekday her list of books that should be passed along to loved ones.

Opium University

Oct 1, 2012
Ceramic opium pipe bowls
(N3 Photo/Tom Banse)

University of Idaho is unpacking 1000 pieces of rare opium smoking equipment. An eccentric collector beat his addiction. Now he just wants them out of his house. Correspondent Tom Banse has the intriguing back story of how these so-called "instruments of self-destruction" came to a small Northwest town.

Homeless Mom: It Costs $700 A Month To Live In A Van

Sep 13, 2012
The back of Elizabeth Jay's Dodge Ram minivan is cluttered with her clothes and supplies because the van is her living room and bedroom.
KUOW Photo/Sarah Rosenthal

When Elizabeth Jay tallies up her living expenses each month, they come to about $700. That doesn't include rent, because Jay is homeless: she lives in her van.

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