arts & life

Author Interview
4:30 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

Sustainability Guru Talks Local Eating

Vicki Robin's book "Blessing the Hand That Feeds Us"

Ross Reynolds talks with Vicki Robin about her latest book, "Blessing the Hand That Feeds Us: What Eating Closer to Home Can Teach Us About Food, Community, and Our Place on Earth.”  In it, she writes about an experiment she did in 2010 to eat only locally-sourced food within 10 miles of her Whidbey Island home. She is a local leader in the sustainable living movement and one of the founders of Sustainable Seattle.

Technology
4:22 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

Gadgets And Business At The 2014 Consumer Electronics Show

A view of the 2014 Consumer Electronics Show.
Flickr Photo/Red Touch Media

Ross Reynolds and Todd Bishop of GeekWire discuss the future of technology after the Consumer Electronics Show.

Textbook Retail
3:47 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

University Book Store Challenged On Own Turf By Amazon

University Book Store's main location in the University District.
Flickr Photo/brewbooks

Online retail juggernaut Amazon ruffled a few feathers on the University of Washington campus last week by setting up a booth to promote its Amazon Student program – just 20 feet away from the University Book Store’s outpost in the Husky Union Building.

Read more
Ask The Mayor
3:34 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray On Police Reform, Minimum Wage, And The Seahawks

Newly inaugurated Seattle Mayor Ed Murray.
Flickr Photo/Joe Szilagyi

Marcie Sillman sits down with new Seattle's Mayor Ed Murray to talk about a range of issues currently facing the city.

Author Interview
3:28 pm
Mon January 13, 2014

Gary Shteyngart: From The Soviet Union To US Novelist

Author Gary Shteyngart in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ross Reynolds interviews author Gary Shteyngart about his new memoir: a story of growing up in the Soviet Union, moving to the US as a child and becoming a novelist. It’s called “Little Failure.”

Tibetan School For The Blind
9:35 am
Mon January 13, 2014

Lessons On Blindness, 'For The Benefit Of Those Who See'

A blind child studies at the Braille Without Borders school in Lhasa, Tibet, in 2005. The program was the first of its kind in the country.
China Photos Getty Images

Originally published on Sun January 12, 2014 3:50 pm

In 2005, Rosemary Mahoney was assigned to write a magazine profile of the woman who started Tibet's first school for the blind, Braille Without Borders.

Sabriya Tenberken, who is blind herself, traveled to Tibet as a young woman and found that blind children there had no access to education, which motivated her to set up a program. During college in Germany, where she grew up, Tenberken also developed the first Braille script for the Tibetan language.

Read more
Good Reads
7:00 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Nancy Pearl Can’t Wait For These Women Writers’ Books

Public radio librarian Nancy Pearl.
KUOW Photo

Nancy Pearl is looking forward to reading at least three books coming out in 2014. Of course, this is only the start of her 2014 reading list. 

In fiction, the popular Jo Walton has another science fiction novel, “My Real Children.” In non-fiction, “Hotel Florida: Truth, Love, and Death in the Spanish Civil War,” by Amanda Vaill and “Flappers: Six Women Of A Dangerous Generation,” by Judith Mackrell. 

Bridge Scandal
3:16 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

The History Of Revenge Politics

George Washington Bridge, which connects New York with Fort Lee.
Flickr Photo/Wally Gobetz

David Hyde gets some historical perspective on revenge politics from Kenneth C. Davis, historian and author of "Don't Know Much About History," in light of the New Jersey Governor Chris Christie's recent traffic scandal.

Television
3:05 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Green Is Still The Only Color That Matters In TV

Actress Kerry Washington, who plays Olivia Pope on the hit show "Scandal."
From the "Scandal" Facebook page.

David Hyde talks with Robert Thompson, Director of the Bleier Center for Television & Popular Culture Trustee at Syracuse University about racial diversity on television. From The Cosby Show to In Living Color to Scandal, for the last three decades shows starring and produced by African-Americans have been huge hits; but primetime television still remains mostly white.

Sports
3:05 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

Behind Enemy Lines: A New Orleans Restaurant On Seahawks Game Day

New Orleans Creole Restaurant, in Seattle's Pioneer Square.
Flickr Photo/javacolleen

David Hyde talks with Dean Haugen, owner of Pioneer Square's New Orleans Creole Restaurant, about the Saints' fans seeking refuge at his restaurant on a Seahawks game day.

Read more
Reputation Economics
3:05 pm
Fri January 10, 2014

How Much Is Your Mother Worth?

Joshua Klein in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Ross Reynolds talks with professional hacker and author Joshua Klein about why who you know is more valuable than what you have.

Movie Reviews
9:50 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Mommy Issues Writ Large For A Troubled Teen

Kaya Scodelario plays a melodramatic teenager obsessed with her mother's death in The Truth About Emanuel, the second film from director Francesca Gregorini.
Tribeca Film

Originally published on Thu January 9, 2014 2:02 pm

What's a domestic melodrama without a mom to kill off, to sicken, to render monstrous or otherwise AWOL?

Read more
Black Women On Mainstream TV
9:50 am
Fri January 10, 2014

Conversation About 'SNL' And Diversity 'Just Getting Started'

Meet Sasheer Zamata, Saturday Night Live's new cast member.
Heidi Gutman ABC via Getty Images

Originally published on Fri January 10, 2014 10:10 am

It may seem, now that Saturday Night Live has hired a black female cast member and two black female writers, that the conversation about diversity on TV's most influential comedy show is over.

But it's just getting started.

Read more
Sports
9:27 am
Fri January 10, 2014

With Super Bowl Hopes, Can Seahawks Live Up To The Hype?

Die-hard Seahawks fans pack CenturyLink Field in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Philip Robertson

Ross Reynolds talks with Seattle Times columnist Jerry Brewer about the Seattle Seahawks' chances to beat the New Orleans Saints in the second round of the NFL playoffs.

Literary Controversy
3:30 pm
Thu January 9, 2014

Fifty Years After ‘Eichmann In Jerusalem’ With Seyla Benhabib

Hannah Arendt's book "Eichmann in Jerusalem," which was one of the most controversial books of the last century.

In 1963, one of the most controversial books of the twentieth century was published. “Eichmann in Jerusalem” presented Adolf Eichmann not as a sociopath — but as an ordinary person who simply believed his actions were normal. The author of this book, political theorist Hannah Arendt, refers to this theory as the “banality of evil.” Arendt was a Jew who fled Germany in the early 1930s. 

Yale professor Seyla Benhabib offers an overview of the controversy surrounding Arendt’s book, and what lessons it can teach us about humanity. Benhabib spoke at the University of Washington’s Kane Hall on October 24, 2013 as part of the Graduate School lecture series.

Pages