arts & life

For Madison Stewart, Sharks Are Family

Jun 13, 2014

Madison Stewart is a woman on a mission — to save sharks. The 20-year-old Australian has been diving with them ever since she was a child.

“Nothing is more peaceful to me than being in the water with them. I spent more time of my childhood with them than I did with people,” she told Here & Now’s Meghna Chakrabarti.

The talk on the streets of Brazil is the host country's resounding victory over Croatia on the World Cup pitch. But online, debate is raging over whether or not chants directed against Brazil's President Dilma Rousseff at the stadium where she was attending yesterday's match were sexist.

After the opening ceremony, fans briefly started jeering "Hey, Dilma, go f*** yourself in the a**! Hey, FIFA, go f*** yourself in the a**!"

Editors' Note: This post has been revised to clarify and correct reporting on the findings of the bike helmet study. The researchers looked at head injuries, not just brain injuries, so the descriptions have been changed to head injuries throughout. The lead researcher said in response to follow-up questions that the study was designed to look at the risk of head injuries as a proportion of all injuries related to bicycling, so the headline and descriptions of the work have been changed to reflect that distinction.

Seattle Symphony YouTube Video

Critics are squabbling over Seattle Symphony's latest program: teaming up with Sir Mix-A-Lot and some dancing women at Benaroya Hall in a performance of "Baby Got Back."

You don't associate orchestral music with liking big butts and not lying, but the video of the performance is a hit — more than two million views on YouTube so far. (Scroll down to watch the video.)

Parents, teachers and cheesy after-school specials have long tried to convince kids that being cool and popular isn't all that it's cracked up to be. Now scientists are chiming in as well.

photo by Ben Van Houten, courtesy SSO

Russian-born composer Igor Stravinsky's career spanned most of the 20th century, but chances are you know him best for a piece of music he wrote when he was just starting out: "Rite of Spring."

Update at 4:31 p.m. ET

And Brazil does recover, with a goal from star Neymar a few minutes later.

Update at 4:28 p.m. ET

The beautiful game is not so beautiful for Brazil in the early moments of the game: Croatia is ahead 1-0 after an own goal by the home team. It's early, though. Plenty of time for Brazil to recover.

[A tweet from NPR's Russell Lewis in Sao Paulo.]

Update at 10:25 a.m. ET

Flickr Photo/Jeff Werner (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with University of Maryland doctoral student and National Science Foundation research fellow Jesse Harrington about a new report analyzing the "tightness" and "looseness" of American states in regards to social norms such as sneezing and talking in public places.

How Karate Helped Local Sensei Escape Abuse

Jun 11, 2014
Courtesy of Joni Sharrah

Joni Sharrah runs a dojo in Shoreline, north of Seattle. A teacher for 30 years, she knows that karate transcends punching and kicking. That's because experience has taught her that karate can save a person’s life – physically and emotionally.

Joe Cicippio was held hostage by the Islamic group Hezbollah in Lebanon for five years, often chained to a radiator in a room with blacked-out windows, cut off entirely from the outside world. Within weeks of his release in 1991, he asked if he could go back to his old job as the comptroller at the American University of Beirut.

Alex Tizon's book "Big Little Man."

Marcie Sillman talks to journalist and author Alex Tizon about his memoir about coming of age as an Asian-American in Seattle and his search for self.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Marcie Sillman talks with Northeastern University criminologist James Alan Fox about crime data and why we are so quick to search for a trend in the midst of tragedy.

How The Media Can Help Prevent Mass Shootings

Jun 10, 2014
Flickr Photo/Travis S.

Forensic psychologist Dr. Park Dietz worries the media has encouraged copycats of mass shootings. Recently, there have been two college shootings in as many weeks.

“The longer we continue the coverage, the more colorful, emotionally-arousing and biographical about the shooter that coverage is, the more imitators we’ll attract,” Dietz told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman on The Record. Sillman spoke with Dietz on Friday, the day after a shooting at Seattle Pacific University left one dead and three wounded.

Poet Christine Deavel
Rebecca Hoogs

Poet Christine Deavel trains her empathetic eye on two familiar places: North Seattle's Thornton Creek ("In Your Care") and the grocery store checkout line ("Each Day on the Verge").  

As she transforms these places through unexpected language and imagery, she also holds open questions about what it means to be whole, to be a neighbor, to be in one another's care. 

David Sax' book "Tastemakers."

Marcie Sillman talks with food writer David Sax about the evolution of food trends in North America. Sax has written the book, "The Tastemakers: Why We're Crazy for Cupcakes but Fed Up with Fondue," which answers such questions as: Why are kale salads on every restaurant menu? And why has bacon moved from a breakfast item to become part of every meal, even dessert?

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