arts & life

EarthFix Reports
9:39 am
Fri January 24, 2014

How Do You Squeeze Gardens Into Cityscapes? Think Vertical

Seattle's vertical garden is an art installation that asks passersby to consider innovative ways to squeeze gardens into urban areas.
Nate Watters

In dense, concrete-locked urban areas like Seattle space for gardening is hard to come by. After all, this is a city where land is so valuable that people spend an average of $346 per square foot on their homes.

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Technology
1:09 am
Fri January 24, 2014

At 30, The Original Mac Is Still An Archetype Of Innovation

A 1984 Apple Macintosh Classic was on display at the Museum for Art and Industry in Hamburg, Germany, in 2011.
Philipp Guelland dapd

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 4:58 am

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Adolescent Psychology
9:22 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Inside The Teenage Brain With Daniel Siegel

Daniel Siegel's book "Brainstorm."

The teenage brain can be a mystery to adults. UCLA psychiatry professor Daniel Siegel debunks myths about adolescence to show how teens learn new skills, connect with others and demonstrate limitless creativity.

Siegel is the author of “Brainstorm: The Power and Purpose of the Teenage Brain.”

He spoke at Town Hall on December 13, 2013, in a lecture presented by ParentMap.

Alaskan Way Viaduct
4:34 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

What's In A Name? Apparently, Forgiveness For Bertha

Bertha, the world’s biggest tunnel boring machine, has been stuck under Seattle since Dec. 6, 2013.
Flickr Photo/WSDOT

She loves dirt and hates sunlight. Seattle Magazine named her one of 2013’s most influential people, except she’s not really a person. She’s Bertha, the world’s biggest tunnel boring machine, charged with digging out the replacement path for the Alaskan Way Viaduct under Seattle.

Her profile on the Washington State Department of Transportation site lists her occupation as a tunneling specialist, but right now she’s stuck and has been since December 6. In light of her current predicament, the decision to name the machine, and thus humanize it, could be a shrewd move.

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Pregnant Athletes
4:22 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

A Baby Didn't Bump These Moms Out Of Competition

Malaysian shooting athlete Nur Suryani Taibi was eight months pregnant in 2012 as she prepared for the Summer Olympics in London.
Rebecca Blackwell AP

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 2:32 pm

Let's be clear: Olympians handle the physical challenges of childbirth differently than most of the rest of us.

Aretha Thurmond is a discus thrower who'd already competed in two Olympics when she went to the hospital in labor.

"So I get there and they're like, 'Yeah, whatever, you're 4 centimeters dilated. Go walk around the hospital and come back,' " she says.

Thurmond's hospital was part of a university, so she headed straight for its track, where she power-walked for the next two hours. Then the school's discus throwers came out.

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Author Interview
3:20 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Badluck Way: From Seattle City Slicker To Montana Cowboy

Bryce Andrews' book "Badluck Way."

Marcie Sillman talks with Bryce Andrews about his new memoir "Badluck Way: A Year on the Ragged Edge of the West." It's the story of how a Seattle-raised liberal became a Montana rancher and the ethical and cultural transformations he had to make.

Sports Psychology
3:07 pm
Thu January 23, 2014

Obsessed With The Seahawks? Science Can Explain Why

Author Eric Simons says flying flags and Blue Fridays actually have a psychological and evolutionary basis.
Flickr Photo/Philip Robertson

In recent weeks, the 12th Man has been more ubiquitous in Seattle than rainfall (actually, we’ve been having pretty mild weather).

The flying flags, Blue Fridays and produce displays actually have a psychological and evolutionary basis, according to Eric Simons, author of “The Secret Lives of Sports Fans.”

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Sochi Olympics
9:33 am
Thu January 23, 2014

U.S. Olympic Nordic Team Stacked With Northwest Skiers

U.S. Nordic Olympic team member Erik Bjornsen of Mazama, Wash. demonstrated a finishing lunge for a Methow Valley youngster in December.
Tom Banse Northwest News Network

Originally published on Thu January 23, 2014 8:51 pm

It's looking more and more like Northwest athletes will be unusually well represented at the Winter Olympics in Russia next month. The U.S. Olympic Nordic team was named Wednesday.

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Art Of Our City
7:26 am
Thu January 23, 2014

30-Year-Old Play Revived In Seattle To Combat AIDS Complacency

The lives of Mickey (Stephen Black), Ned (Greg Lyle-Netwon) and Felix (Andrew Russell) are forever affected by the scourge of AIDS in Strawberry Theatre Workshop's "The Normal Heart."
Courtesy of John Ulman

Stephen Black remembers the moment he decided to bring a play called "The Normal Heart" to Seattle.

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Poetry
7:26 am
Thu January 23, 2014

Remembering William Stafford, A 'Poet Of Personal Integrity'

William Stafford's collection "Ask Me."

This year marks the centennial of the birth of William Stafford, a much beloved poet and lifelong pacifist who taught at Lewis and Clark College in Portland for nearly 40 years. To celebrate the occasion, Graywolf Press has released a collection of his poems titled, "Ask Me: 100 Essential Poems."

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Author Interview
7:12 am
Thu January 23, 2014

How Limitations Of Self Control And Corporate Marketing Set Us Up For Obesity Epidemic

Dr. Deborah Cohen's book, “A Big Fat Crisis."

Ross Reynolds talks with Dr. Deborah Cohen about her new book, “A Big Fat Crisis: The Hidden Forces Behind The Obesity Epidemic – And How We Can End It."

She says there are two reasons for the obesity epidemic. First, we’re hardwired to eat and no matter how many diets we try, we can’t overcome the limits of self control. Second, in the modern food environment, corporations aggressively market cheap, unhealthy food.

Sacred Catch
6:00 am
Thu January 23, 2014

The Fish Wars: Fighting As Northwest Salmon Run Dry

Mural near the Fisherman's Cove Marina and Lummi Island Ferry on Lummi Nation.
Credit KUOW Photo/Jeff Emtman

This is an excerpt from KUOW's "Sacred Catch" series. Explore the full series with additional audio, pictures and materials.

Hundreds of Indians climbed the cliffs at night and waited under the edge of the bluff for the first morning light.

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Drugs
4:13 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Neuroscientist: 'Decriminalize All Drugs'

Dr. Carl Hart's book "High Price."

David Hyde speaks with Dr. Carl Hart, a professor at Columbia University, about why he thinks all drugs — including cocaine and heroin — should be decriminalized. His latest book is called "High Price: A Neuroscientist's Journey of Self-Discovery That Challenges Everything You Know About Drugs and Society."

Seasonal Vegetables
3:17 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Getting Fresh With Ross And Sheryl: Sunchokes And Parsnips

Sheryl Wiser of the Cascade Harvest Coalition recommends picking out parsnips that are firm and dry.
Courtesy of Sheryl Wiser

Ross Reynolds talks with Sheryl Wiser of the Cascade Harvest Coalition about what is fresh at the farmer's market this week.

Arts And Literature
1:54 pm
Wed January 22, 2014

Why Sherlock Holmes Keeps Coming Back

Sherlock Holmes, has been immortalized in a number of ways, including this statue at the Baker Street Station for the London Underground.
Credit Flickr Photo/samaja

One of the most popular characters in literature, stage, film and television started with a struggling doctor trying to put food on the table.

In 1887, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, selling stories to magazines and papers as a side profession, introduced a detective and doctor duo in “The Mystery of Uncle Jeremy’s Household” – a prototype that would later become the ubiquitous Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson in “A Study in Scarlet” and an entire canon that followed.

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