arts & life

Educational Experiment
2:04 am
Mon March 17, 2014

Does Teaching Kids To Get 'Gritty' Help Them Get Ahead?

At the Lenox Academy in Brooklyn, N.Y., educators try to teach kids to see struggle as a normal part of learning.
Tovia Smith/NPR

Originally published on Fri May 16, 2014 7:17 am

It's become the new buzz phrase in education: "Got grit?"

Around the nation, schools are beginning to see grit as key to students' success — and just as important to teach as reading and math.

Experts define grit as persistence, determination and resilience; it's that je ne sais quoi that drives one kid to practice trumpet or study Spanish for hours — or years — on end, while another quits after the first setback.

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Overcoming Addiction
10:39 am
Sun March 16, 2014

Wife And Mother: 'You'd Never Suspect My Junkie Past'

Maria Fabrizio for NPR

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 3:56 am

It has been seven years and two months since I woke from my coma. My eyelids were taped shut and my arms were cuffed to some unknown object. The first sense that came back was sound. I could hear the voices of doctors and nurses chatting about the weather.

I distinctly remember a doctor poking my bare feet with a scalpel. "Vegetable," I heard him say. Everything was blackness. "God, help me, what have I done?" I thought. I'm in hell, and I put myself here.

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Seattle Neighborhood Summit
3:05 pm
Fri March 14, 2014

Jim Diers: 'Community Participation,' A Key For Seattle's Future

Queen Anne neighborhood.
Flickr Photo/craterdweller (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with former Seattle Neighborhoods Department Director Jim Diers about his hopes for the upcoming Seattle Neighborhood Summit in April.

Good Reads
2:54 pm
Fri March 14, 2014

Nancy Pearl: Mystery And Science Fiction

Flickr Photo/ Wonderlane (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher and librarian Nancy Pearl get reacquainted with old authors and also discover new names on the mystery and science fiction shelves at Seattle Public Library's Northeast Branch.

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25th Anniversary
2:53 pm
Fri March 14, 2014

Local Seniors Share How They Use The World Wide Web

Flickr Photo/Ken Russell (CC BY-NC-ND)

As part of our week-long series on the 25th anniversary of the World Wide Web, The Record takes a trip to the Ballard Senior Center to learn how senior citizens are using the web today.

We hear from Stan Steenrod, Katherine Quackenbush, Robert Brumfield, Ruth Higgins, Stephen Sill, Betty Aman and Claire Anderson.

Harrowing Story
2:16 am
Fri March 14, 2014

In 2009, 3 Americans Went For A Hike, And Ended Up In A Tehran Prison

Joshua Fattal (from left), Sarah Shourd and Shane Bauer were on a hike in 2009 when they unknowingly crossed a road that bordered to Iran. They were stopped by border patrol and imprisoned in Tehran.
Mia Nakano Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 8:27 am

In the summer of 2009, three young Americans went for a hike. Shane Bauer and Sarah Shourd were living together in Syria, teaching and writing. Their friend Josh Fattal was visiting from the U.S. The three took a tour to a waterfall in the Kurdish highlands of Iraq, and as they hiked along a road that turned out to be the border with Iran, an armed man in uniform waved them over.

The next thing they knew, they had embarked on a two-year ordeal in the infamous Evin prison in Tehran. They join NPR's Renee Montagne to talk about their new memoir, A Sliver of Light.

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'Heat And Eat'
4:10 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

States' Rebellion Against Food Stamp Cuts Grows

States are taking an out provided by Congress to avoid cutting food stamp benefits to families, many of whom already depend on food banks like the Alameda County Community Food Bank in Oakland, Calif.
Antonio Mena Courtesy of Alameda County Community Food Bank

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 10:41 am

When Congress passed a farm bill earlier this year, it expected to save $8.6 billion over 10 years by tightening what many say is a loophole in the food stamp, or SNAP, program. But it's not going to happen.

You see, Congress left states an opening to avoid the cuts. And so far, nearly half of the states participating have decided to take that option — a move that could erase the promised savings.

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Food For Thought
3:49 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

Salmon: 'Nature's Earliest Convenience Food'

Flickr Photo/cobalt123 (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with author Nicholaas Mink about the early days of salmon and how the fish changed the culture in the Pacific Northwest. His latest book is, "Salmon: A Global History."

Urban Planning
3:34 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

Designing The Happy City

Charles Montgomery's book, "Happy City."

Steve Scher talks with author Charles Montgomery about his book, "Happy City: Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design."

Neighborhood Change
3:22 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

The Wah Mee Club Building: More Than The Tragedy

The historic building, which once housed the Wah Mee Club, will be destroyed after the December fire.
Google Maps

Steve Scher meets up with community activist Ron Chew in the Chinatown-International District to talk about the impending demolition of the building that housed the Wah Mee Club and what it means for the community as a whole.

Labor
2:06 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

How Decline Of Unions Contributed To Rise In Inequality

Jake Rosenfeld's book "What Unions No Longer Do."

Ross Reynolds talks with University of Washington sociology professor Jake Rosenfeld about his book, “What Unions No Longer Do."

After World War II, one in three workers belonged to a union. Today, only one in 20 people employed in the private sector are in unions. Rosenfeld argues the decline of unions has helped lead to a rise in inequality.

Photography
12:39 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

Colin Powell's Vintage Selfie Is A Must See

Colin Powell takes a selfie circa 1954.
Colin Powell

Originally published on Fri March 14, 2014 9:22 am

We told you about the star-stuffed Oscar selfie taken by Ellen DeGeneres that broke Twitter.

It was cool and all, until we learned that it was a publicity stunt by Samsung.

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Avant-Garde Artist
12:30 pm
Thu March 13, 2014

20th-Century Giant Joan Miró At Seattle Art Museum

"Woman, Bird and Star (Homage to Picasso)," February 15, 1966/April 3-8, 1973. By Joan Miró, Spanish, 1893-1983.
Credit Successió Miró/Artists Rights Society

Seattle Art Museum contemporary and modern art curator Catharina Manchanda calls Joan Miró one of the great avant-garde artists of the 20th century. But audiences on the West Coast of the United States have never had a chance to see a comprehensive exhibition of Miró's art, until now.

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Presidential Election
9:36 am
Thu March 13, 2014

‘Game Change 2012’ With John Heilemann And Mark Halperin

John Heilemann and Mark Halperin's book "Double Down."

John Heilemann and Mark Halperin are the authors of "Game Change," the best-selling story of the 2008 presidential election that was turned into an HBO movie.

In their new book, “Double Down: Game Change 2012," they apply their political knowledge to the 2012 presidential race. They go beyond the headlines to offer an account of a hard-fought campaign on both sides.

They spoke at the First Presbyterian Church on November 12, 2013, in an event sponsored by Town Hall.

EarthFix Reports
9:06 am
Thu March 13, 2014

EarthFix Conversation: Using Environmental Law To Combat Climate Change

Mary Wood is the founder of the University of Oregon's Environment and Natural Resources Law Program.
Credit Courtesy of University of Oregon

Can environmental laws protect the planet from climate change? They haven't so far, according to University of Oregon law professor Mary Wood. But she says one day they could.

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