arts & life

In the wake of most tragedies, makeshift memorials fill up with flowers and teddy bears. After the Boston Marathon bombings last April, running shoes became potent symbols in the vast memorial there.

Now, after months in storage at the cavernous City Archives, a group of objects left at the site are in a new exhibition at the Boston Public Library.

KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

The first wave of memorial services honoring the victims who perished in the Oso landslide took place this weekend.

In Darrington, residents gathered to remember Linda McPherson, a longtime resident and librarian. After the service, the community gathered for a meal together. It's a special tradition that goes back many decades in this small community.

Flickr Photo/Dinur Blum (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher recaps the news of the week with Knute Berger of Crosscut and Seattle Magazine, political analyst C.R. Douglas for Q13 Fox News and associate editor Eli Sanders of The Stranger.

Whoops! Getting It Wrong On 'The Record'

Apr 4, 2014
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

As KUOW wraps up another successful spring pledge drive, we take a moment to reflect on our not-so-finest moments of public radio — it's The Record's blooper reel.

Civil Rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968.
Wikimedia Commons

On April 4th, 1968,  Gary Heyde had just arrived for a conference at Kentucky State College. He and more than 500 students from every major black university waited in line to register. Heyde happened to be the only white student there.

No more than 20 minutes had passed when a girl came running into the lobby where conference-goers waited to register. “They’ve killed Martin,” she screamed.

At first, the room was cloaked in complete and total silence. Then chaos ensued.

“The students that I was with were in a panic, I mean, it’s not like any of us had ever been in a riot,” Heyde said. “So they grabbed me and they said, ‘Gary, we need to tell you this. When we first got here and we stopped at the dorm, students were already a little upset that you were going to be staying in the dorm. So I think we need to get out here.’”

Gary Heyde barely escaped the calamity of riots and violence surrounding him. He made it out. Listen (at 10:31 for those short on time) to find out how.

This archive originally aired in October 2011. Produced for the Web by Brieana Ripley.

Nancy Pearl: Swing And A Hit

Apr 4, 2014
Flickr Photo/Mike Rastiello (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with librarian Nancy Pearl about just a few of the many baseball books available, just in time for Tuesday's Opening Night at Safeco Field.

Courtesy of NASA

Ross Reynolds talks to Alan Boyle, science editor for NBCNews.com, about the recent discovery of water on Saturn's moon Enceladus. Boyle also talks about NASA's proposed mission to Europa and how the agency decides where to focus its space exploration dollars.

Irwin Redlener's book, "Americans at Risk."

Ross Reynolds talks with Irwin Redlener, author of "Americans at Risk: Why We Are Not Prepared for Megadisasters and What We Can Do." Redlener explains why natural disasters like the Oso landslide are rarely the wake-up calls we'd expect.

Tom Mueller's book, "Extra Virginity."

Marcie Sillman talks with author Tom Mueller about his book, "Extra Virginity: The Sublime and Scandalous World of Olive Oil."

Shane Bauer, Joshua Fattal and Sarah Shourd's memoir, "A Sliver of Light."

Steve Scher talks with American hikers Shane Bauer, Sarah Shourd and Josh Fattal. Their memoir, “A Sliver of Light: Three Americans Imprisoned in Iran,” is about how they spent two years in prison after the trio wandered over the Iranian border in 2009.

Think about how long you can hold your breath and then let this discovery blow your mind.

Flickr Photo/Jonavin (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Gay Bradshaw about why she thinks elephants don't belong in zoos. Bradshaw is the executive director of the Kerulos Center in Jacksonville, Ore., and author of "Elephants on the Edge: What Animals Teach Us About Humanity."

The Strange Language Of Baseball

Apr 2, 2014
Flickr Photo/Keith-Allison (CC BY-NC-ND)

From 'cup of coffee' to 'Bronx cheer,' Ross Reynolds runs the language bases of baseball with linguist Ben Zimmer.

Nicholson Baker's book, "Traveling Sprinkler."

In his new book “Traveling Sprinkler,” novelist Nicholson Baker tells the story of a 55-year-old poet’s obsession with electronic dance music, Debussy, and his ex girlfriend who works as a local NPR radio host. Baker has written nine novels and five books of non-fiction and speaks with The Record's Ross Reynolds.

This interview originally aired on September 30, 2013.

Garrison Keillor's book, "O, What A Luxury."

Steve Scher talks with Garrison Keillor about his first collection of original poetry, "O, What A Luxury: Verses Vulgar, Pathetic & Profound.”

This interview originally aired on November 6, 2013.

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