arts & life

Poetry
9:18 am
Wed April 9, 2014

Kima Jones, On Black Bodies And Being A Black Woman Who Writes

Kima Jones
Courtesy of Kima Jones

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 8:25 am

April is National Poetry Month — and at Code Switch, we like poems. We will be exploring a set of broad issues of race and ethnicity in modern poetry for the duration of the month.

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Heads Or Tales
8:29 am
Wed April 9, 2014

My Kingdom For A Horse-Head Squirrel Feeder

A squirrel partakes of a snack from the horse head feeder
Credit Archie McPhee

Seattle-based company Archie McPhee is getting national attention for putting a horse head on a squirrel.

To clarify, the company is selling a squirrel feeder shaped like a hollow horse head. You put the food up inside it and wait for a curious squirrel to stick its head in with hilarious consequences.

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Business And Housing
7:27 am
Wed April 9, 2014

The Ultimate Reuse: Shipping Containers For Buildings

Starbucks has been rolling out drive-through, walk-up locations made out of recycled shipping containers. This location is in Tukwila, Washington.
Flickr Photo/vmax137 (CC-BY-NC-ND)

The cost of housing in the city is making many people think small, to embrace the micro movement that loves to reuse and recycle. Enter the idea of a shipping container as a building — a natural in a port city like Seattle, which handles 1.6 million container units in a year.

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True Crime
3:04 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

How A Phony Rockefeller Fooled Walter Kirn

Credit Walter Kirn's book, "Blood Will Out."

Ross Reynolds speaks with novelist Walter Kirn, perhaps best known for book, “Up in the Air."

Kirn’s latest work reads like fiction, but it’s not. “Blood Will Out: The True Story of a Murder, a Mystery, and a Masquerade” is about Kirn's association with a man who called himself Clark Rockefeller and claimed to be a member of the Rockefeller family — one of the most powerful families in American history.

It turns out, Clark Rockefeller was not a Rockefeller nor an American. He was a murderer.

Rwanda Genocide
1:28 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

Remembering Rwandans Who Followed Their Conscience

Godleaves Mukamunana, left, hid Domitil Mukakumuranga, in her house for weeks so that Hutu militias wouldn't kill her. "Seeing her alive is the best thing," Mukamunana says. "That kind of relationship we have is priceless. The fact that I don't have more like her --€” those who were killed — that's what's hurting."
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Mon May 5, 2014 2:10 pm

Olive Mukankusi lives in a two-room house with mud walls and a dirt floor in a village called Igati, in eastern Rwanda's Rwamagana province. To get there, you have to drive about 30 minutes down a dirt road.

It's there, in her home, on a warm and sunny afternoon, that she tells a story that she's only told three times in 20 years: first to a local judge, then to an American genocide researcher — and now.

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Security Issues
1:19 pm
Tue April 8, 2014

The Security Bug That Affects Most Of The Internet, Explained

A screen grab from a Heartbleed test Tuesday morning showed Yahoo was vulnerable. The company has since fixed the vulnerability.
filippo.io/Heartbleed screengrab

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 2:45 pm

Editor's Note: A very serious bug with a scary name, Heartbleed, was discovered and disclosed this week. The bug affects OpenSSL, a popular cryptographic library that is used to secure a huge chunk of the Internet's traffic. Even if you have never heard of OpenSSL, chances are, it's helped secure your data in some way.

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Poetry
10:02 am
Tue April 8, 2014

A Poet's Response To World War I Facial Injury And Reconstruction

Ann Gerike's new book is part poetry collection, part medical history.
Credit Floating Bridge Press

Poet Ann Gerike combined years of research with an empathetic imagination to write "About Face: World War I Facial Injury and Reconstruction." Her poems bring to life the stories of terribly disfigured soldiers and surgeon Major Harold Gillies, whose wartime innovations helped restore their faces.

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Community Resilience
8:08 am
Tue April 8, 2014

One Man's Story Of Rebuilding After 'Total Devastation'

Mike Peroni's farm in Curtis, Wash. was wiped out by a 2007 flood. It took him and his family years to rebuild.
Liz Jones KUOW

Mike Peroni knows what it’s like to live through a disaster. In 2007, a massive flood wiped out his home and farm in Curtis, Wash., about 40 miles south of Olympia.

For him, stories from the tragic landslide near Oso, Wash., on March 22 have hit an emotional scar.

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Video Games
4:31 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Rhianna Pratchett: 'It's More Interesting To Create Diverse Characters'

Lara Croft is the protagonist of the video game series, "Tomb Raider."
Credit Flickr Photo/Joshua Livingston (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with video game scriptwriter, Rhianna Pratchett, about writing for "Tomb Raider" and the struggle of including more diversity in the gaming world.

Appeal Of Repitition
3:30 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Play It Again And Again, Sam

Rick Blaine, the sentimental tough guy in Casablanca, pined for "As Time Goes By."
The Kobal Collection

Originally published on Wed April 9, 2014 5:57 am

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Author Interview
2:12 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

The Norwegian Author You Might Start Hearing More About

Credit Jo Nesbo's book, "Police."

Marcie Sillman interviews Norwegian author Jo Nesbo about the newest book in his crime series about the character Harry Hole called, "Police." It has just been published in English and one of his earlier books is being adapted for film.

This interview originally aired on November 7, 2013.

Operatic Firsts
1:45 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Two Leads, Two Deaths In 18 Hours

Kristine Opolais made her Madama Butterfly debut as Cio-Cio-San, only to get a last-minute call to play Mimi in La Boheme.
Marty Sohl Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:29 pm

Over the weekend, soprano Kristine Opolais sang her heart out — and died twice.

Friday evening she had sung the lead in Puccini's Madama Butterfly. It was her debut in that role at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. It was a big deal. Opolais was so excited about it that she stayed up until five the next morning.

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Traveling With Ivory
1:44 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Musicians, Take Note: Your Instrument May Be Contraband

Antique bows were often made with a small piece of ivory that clamps the bow hairs onto the wood.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:29 pm

New Obama administration rules aimed at protecting African elephants are causing widespread anxiety in the music world. From country to classical, working musicians say the policy will make them think twice about touring abroad.

The proposed regulations would place a near-total ban on anything made with ivory moving in and out of the U.S.

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Layers Of Meaning
1:03 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

In New Exhibit, Running Shoes Are Potent Symbol Of Boston Bombing

A pair of running shoes left at the Boston Marathon memorial last year.
Jesse Costa WBUR

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:29 pm

In the wake of most tragedies, makeshift memorials fill up with flowers and teddy bears. After the Boston Marathon bombings last April, running shoes became potent symbols in the vast memorial there.

Now, after months in storage at the cavernous City Archives, a group of objects left at the site are in a new exhibition at the Boston Public Library.

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Comforting Traditions
7:25 am
Mon April 7, 2014

Funeral Dinners Help Darrington Cope With Losses

Darrington Community Center hosted a meal for librarian Linda McPherson as part of the community's long-running tradition.
Credit KUOW Photo/Ruby de Luna

The first wave of memorial services honoring the victims who perished in the Oso landslide took place this weekend.

In Darrington, residents gathered to remember Linda McPherson, a longtime resident and librarian. After the service, the community gathered for a meal together. It's a special tradition that goes back many decades in this small community.

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