arts & life

'Economic Discrimination'
1:46 pm
Sun April 27, 2014

49ers Fan Sues NFL For $50 Million Over Seattle Playoff Tickets

A 49ers fan displays her hopes for next season at a Seahawks game. If a San Francisco fan has his way, the sign could also refer to playoff tickets, which were limited to markets with strong Seattle support this year.
Kevin C. Cox Getty Images

Saying the Seattle Seahawks kept San Francisco 49ers fans from being able to pull for their team in January's NFC title game, a 49ers fan is suing the NFL, claiming the practice of limiting ticket sales to pro-Seahawks markets amounts to "economic discrimination." He is seeking $50 million in damages.

As hosts of the playoff game, the Seahawks limited credit-card sales of tickets to accounts with billing addresses in a list of nearby states. California wasn't on that list, which included parts of Canada and Hawaii. As a resident of Nevada, John E. Williams III was shut out.

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Andy Warhol
5:12 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Turning The Tacoma Dome Into Public Art

Rendering of what one of the Andy Warhol flowers would look like on the Tacoma Dome.
Credit City of Tacoma/Amy McBride

Marcie Sillman checks in with Tacoma Arts Administrator Amy McBride about the city's endeavor to turn the Tacoma Dome into a large flower designed by Andy Warhol.

Everest Avalanche
4:06 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

After Tragedy On Everest, A Question Of How To Help Sherpas

Mount Everest
Credit Flickr Photo/Rupert Taylor-Price (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Sherpa senior guide Lakpa Rita Sherpa about the avalanche that killed five of his men on Mount Everest last Friday. Lakpa is also the leader of an expedition from Alpine Ascents International.

Sillman also talks with David Morton, a mountaineer who has started the Juniper Fund to help Sherpas who are injured or killed on the job.

The deadly avalanche on April 18 killed 16 men.

Author Interview
4:05 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

From Nigeria To Middle America: Optimism Spans Continents In Mengestu's Book

Credit Dinaw Mengestu's book, "All Our Names."

Steve Scher sits down with 2012 MacArthur Genius Grant recipient and writer Dinaw Mengestu to talk about his newest book, "All Our Names."

Nancy Pearl
4:04 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

Why Do You Love The Books You Love?

Credit Flickr Photo/Silke Gerstenkorn (CC BY-NC-ND)

Think of your favorite book. What is it about that book that makes you love it? Is it the eloquence of the sentences? The adrenaline of the story? Characters that seem so real they could be friends? A setting that sweeps you away?

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Rock 'N' Roll
2:59 pm
Fri April 25, 2014

'A Man Called Destruction:' A Biography Of Musician Alex Chilton

Credit Holly George-Warren's book, "A Man Called Destruction."

Ross Reynolds talks with author Holly George-Warren about her new biography of musician Alex Chilton, "A Man Called Destruction: The Life and Music of Alex Chilton, From Box Tops to Big Star to Backdoor Man."

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Poetry For Mortality
11:20 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Poet Marie Howe On 'What The Living Do' After Loss

Marie Howe is the author of three collections of poetry. She has received a Guggenheim Fellowship and a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship.

Brad Fowler courtesy of the author

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 12:54 pm

This is an excerpt from a longer interview that was originally broadcast on Oct. 19, 2011.

A few years after her younger brother John died from AIDS-related complications in 1989, poet Marie Howe wrote him a poem in the form of a letter. Called "What the Living Do," the poem is an elegiac description of loss, and of living beyond loss.

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Movies
11:17 am
Fri April 25, 2014

But You Can Never Leave: 'The Girl And Death' In A Creepy Hotel

Sylvia Hoeks in The Girl and Death.
Jos Stelling Films

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 9:38 am

At the German hotel where Jos Stelling's The Girl and Death takes place, the guests include everyone from incapacitated men and women patiently awaiting death (the hotel seems to function in part as a makeshift sanatorium) to lively if somewhat unhinged residents given to impromptu performances of Romeo and Juliet monologues in the dining hall.

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StoryCorps
11:16 am
Fri April 25, 2014

After A Shocking Loss, Finding Healing By Teaching Others

Ayodeji Ogunniyi and his father, Abimbola "Yinka" Ogunniyi, at their first American home in South Holland, Ill., in 1993.
Courtesy of Ayodeji Ogunniyi

Originally published on Fri April 25, 2014 2:10 pm

Ayodeji Ogunniyi was a pre-med student when his father was murdered by three young men. So Ogunniyi decided that becoming a teacher, not a doctor, would help ensure his father's death was not in vain. (This StoryCorps interview initially aired Oct. 30, 2011 on Weekend Edition Sunday.)

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Movies
11:15 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Tracing One Life, Lost In The Desert

Gael Garcia Bernal narrates and travels in the documentary Who Is Dayani Cristal?
Kino Lorber

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 3:41 pm

Who Is Dayani Cristal? attempts to humanize the many who illegally cross the U.S.-Mexico border by focusing on just one: a corpse found in the lethal Arizona desert with the words "Dayani Cristal" tattooed on his chest. The documentary follows the models of several genres of fictional films: the forensic procedural, the road movie, the man-who-wasn't-there mystery.

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Movies
11:14 am
Fri April 25, 2014

In 'Blue Ruin,' Revenge Is Not Served Cool

Macon Blair plays Dwight in the unsettling revenge thriller Blue Ruin.
Radius TWC

Originally published on Thu April 24, 2014 5:20 pm

Revenge at the movies is a dish best served not cold, but cool. Homemade justice isn't just meted out by the wronged onscreen; it's delivered with swagger, style, and steely-eyed bad-assery. Michael Caine as Carter, Uma Thurman as The Bride, Charles Bronson as Paul Kersey: These are all individuals who are suave under pressure and look pretty hip to boot, in well-tailored three-piece suits, canary yellow racing leathers, and black leather jackets. (Shotgun, katana, and .38 Special accessories definitely not optional.)

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Author Interview
9:44 am
Fri April 25, 2014

Benny And Jenny: Uncovering The Franklin Sibling Relationship

Author and historian Jill Lepore speaking at event for Kansas City Public Library.
Flickr Photo/Kansas City Public Library

When they were little, they were called Benny and Jenny. They were inseparable. But as they grew up, their lives took different paths. Benjamin Franklin left home; his sister Jane Franklin never did. He taught himself to write; she couldn’t spell. He signed the Declaration and the Constitution; she became a wife, mother, and ultimately, a widow.

But they maintained a correspondence throughout their lives, and historian Jill Lepore says Franklin loved no one more than his sister. Lepore shed light on this story at Seattle’s Town Hall on October 9.

This story originally aired on December 12, 2013.

Imagining Book Moments
2:59 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Photographing Literature's Famous Food Scenes

"The kitchen table was loaded with enough food to bury the family: hunks of salt pork, tomatoes, beans, even scuppernongs." (To Kill a Mockingbird)
Dinah Fried

Originally published on Thu September 20, 2012 10:37 am

A confession: I've read Jack Kerouac's On the Road, but I can't tell you much about it. Yes, I know he's on a road trip. But beyond that, I don't recall any of the characters or anything they do or what the point was. What I do remember is that he described some truly great food. In fact, I liked those sections of the book so much that when I read them, I apparently felt the need to scribble them down, word for word, in a notebook.

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Racial Discrimination
2:48 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Stuart Taylor: Affirmative Action Is A Disservice To Minorities

Credit Stuart Taylor's book, "Mismatch."

Marcie Sillman talks with Stuart Taylor, Jr., a Brookings Institution nonresident senior fellow, about race and how it should or should not be used in college admissions or hiring practices.

Taylor is also the author of "Mismatch: How Affirmative Action Hurts Students It's Intended to Help, and Why Universities Won't Admit It."

Race And Class
2:48 pm
Thu April 24, 2014

Exploring Winners, Losers And Theater With James Long and Marcus Youssef

Theater actors James Long and Marcus Youssef of "Winners and Losers."
Credit Courtesy of Simon Hayter

What does it mean to be a winner in today's society? That's a concept Canadian theater artists James Long and Marcus Youssef explore in their show, "Winners and Losers." They've taken the show all over the world, most recently to Seattle's On The Boards.

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