arts & life

Author Interview
2:34 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

President Of Pixar And Disney Animation On Fostering Creativity

Ed Catmull, president of Disney.
Credit AP Photo/Joel Ryan

David Hyde talks to Ed Catmull, the co-founder of Pixar Animation Studios and president of Pixar and Disney animation, about managing creative people and his new book "Creativity Inc: Overcoming The Unseen Forces That Stand In The Way Of True Inspiration."

Urban Parklets
2:28 pm
Fri May 9, 2014

Seattle Is Putting The 'Park' In Parking Space

The finished Capitol Hill parklet on Olive Way in Seattle.
Flickr Photo/Jeremy Reding (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jennifer Wielund, public space program manager at the Seattle Department of Transportation, about the crop of a dozen new pilot parklets which will appear in parking spaces across the city this summer.

RadioActive Youth Media
10:28 am
Fri May 9, 2014

The Misunderstood Fans Of 'My Little Pony'

Members of the local Everfree Northwest group call themselves "bronies." Bronies are older fans of the TV show, "My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic."
Credit Courtesy of Everfree NW/Benjamin Ruby

In an unforgiving world, who wouldn’t want to retreat to a place where friendship is magic? Bronies are a group of people who live by that. They’re fans of the newest version of  the children's show, My Little Pony. RadioActive youth producer Chris Otey introduces us to some members of the local herd of bronies.

My Little Pony was a TV show for little girls that first appeared in the 1980s. And you might think that 2012’s revamped version, My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic, is also just a show for little girls. But it’s grown into something a little different. And that has created a following of people who have aptly been named “bronies.”

I am one of them.

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Home Repair
3:33 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

A Visit To Your Friendly Neighborhood Tool Library With Roger Faris

Roger Faris holds a pneumatic hand nailer.
Credit KUOW Photo/Steve Scher

Steve Scher visits the Phinney Neighborhood Association's tool library with home repair guru Roger  Faris and head librarian Mike Broili.

'Dreamsongs'
3:25 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Cellist Joshua Roman Teams Up With Seattle Youth Symphony

Cellis Joshua Roman.
Flickr Photo/Vikalpa

At 22, Joshua Roman became the Seattle Symphony's youngest-ever principal cellist. With his mop of curly brown hair and his baby face, Roman was a distinctive presence at Benaroya Hall.

But just two years after the young musician took up his post, Roman decided to leave the orchestra to carve out his own career as a concert performer.

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Generational Trends
3:23 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Millenials Vs. Boomers: What Happens Next?

Credit Paul Taylor's book "The Next America."

Ross Reynolds talks with Paul Taylor, president of the Pew Research Center about his new book, ‘The Next America."

Music History
3:11 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

How The Waltz Came To America (And Pop Music)

From Wikipedia

Almost every partner dance is a descendant of the waltz.

The oldest of ballroom dances, the waltz has roots as far back as the 13th century. As it evolved and entered the ballrooms of Europe, the waltz was viewed as taboo because partners were permitted to make contact. But like the tango and other exciting and challenging dances, the waltz spread until by the middle of the nineteenth century it was firmly established in the U.S.

Today’s standard waltz rhythm that we now know and love became popular due to the musical creations of composers such as Johann Strauss.

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Marijuana
12:43 pm
Thu May 8, 2014

Inside Seattle's First Legal Pot Farm

Bruce Cummins shows off some of Sea of Green Farm's marijuana plants growing in their greenhouse.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Sea of Green Farms sits south of Ballard, just east of Fisherman’s Terminal.

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Philosophical Memoir
11:06 am
Thu May 8, 2014

Barbara Ehrenreich Talks 'Living With A Wild God'

Credit Barbara Ehrenreich's book "Living With a Wild God."

Barbara Ehrenreich is a journalist and activist known for her wry, acerbic, probing and prolific writings. She writes essays and articles related to social injustice and books on subjects she says don’t make money but fascinate her.

In 2001, Ehrenreich was undergoing breast cancer treatment and putting her papers in order simultaneously. She calls the timing “viciously appropriate.”

Among the many boxes from a lifetime of writing she re-discovered a journal she’d kept as an adolescent. Moved by the questions she found there — "Why are we here? What’s going on in the universe? What is all this about?" — she promised to try to better understand her youthful experience if she recovered.

The result is her latest book, "Living with a Wild God: A Nonbeliever’s Search for the Truth about Everything." She calls it a “sort of philosophical memoir, or a metaphysical thriller.”

Ehrenreich spoke with KUOW’s Marcie Sillman at Town Hall Seattle on April 21.

Pop Culture
3:16 pm
Wed May 7, 2014

Why Did Nixon Go On Laugh-In? Politics In Prime Time

First Lady Michelle Obama is slated for a cameo on a prime time television show.
Flickr Photo/Barack Obama (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks to Syracuse University professor, Robert Thompson about what politicians get out of prime time cameos. First Lady Michelle Obama will appear on the television show Nashville tonight, and there is a long history of political figures hitting their mark in prime time.

'Classically Cannabis'
7:41 am
Wed May 7, 2014

Seattle Symphony Has No Plans For Pot Concerts

File photo of the Seattle Symphony Chorale and Orchestra playing at Benaroya Hall.

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 5:21 pm

The only people inhaling at Seattle Symphony concerts will be the wind-instrument players. The Symphony says it has no plans to follow the lead of the Colorado Symphony and hold marijuana-friendly concerts.

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Never-Ending Cycle
12:34 am
Wed May 7, 2014

The Changing Picture Of Poverty: Hard Work Is 'Just Not Enough'

Victoria Houser of Painted Post, N.Y., is raising her son, Brayden, on her own. She says she feels stuck in a never-ending cycle, constantly worried that one financial emergency will send everything tumbling down.
Pam Fessler NPR

Originally published on Wed May 7, 2014 2:27 pm

There are 46 million poor people in the U.S., and millions more hover right above the poverty line — but go into many of their homes, and you might find a flat-screen TV, a computer or the latest sneakers.

And that raises a question: What does it mean to be poor in America today?

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Office Life To Farm Life
3:14 pm
Tue May 6, 2014

How Farming Taught Arlo Crawford To Follow His Bliss

Credit Arlo Crawford's book "A Farm Dies Once a Year."

Arlo Crawford never wanted to be a farmer like his parents. But that changed one spring. He shares his experience from the office back to the fields with KUOW's Marcie Sillman.

Crawford's parents were part of the back-to-the-land generation of the 1970s. Crawford's father dropped out of law school and bought land in southern Pennsylvania. That land became New Morning organic farm, and that's where Crawford and his sister Janie grew up.

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Obituary
8:19 am
Tue May 6, 2014

Tribal Treaty Rights Champion Billy Frank Jr. Dead At Age 83

Billy Frank Jr. at the Elwha Dam removal ceremony in 2011.
Katie Campbell KCTS

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 8:56 am

 Billy Frank Jr., a legendary champion of tribal treaty rights and Northwest salmon restoration, died Monday. He was 83 years old.

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Breastfeeding
5:31 pm
Mon May 5, 2014

Where Do You Pump At Work?

The "lactation room" at KUOW Public Radio. It looks pretty wired, but it's private and there's a soothing humming sound.
Credit KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Hey mamas!

I'm thinking about putting together a slideshow of spaces where women work. As many of you know, federal law requires that workplaces make space for women to pump — but what that space looks like varies wildly.

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