arts & life | KUOW News and Information

arts & life

Flickr Photo/GeekGirlCon

She was the nasal-voiced puppeteer behind Red Fraggle on Jim Henson’s Fraggle Rock, and she hung out with David Bowie on the set of Labyrinth.

Courtesy of Lincoln County Historical Society

In the competitive world of fishing, joining forces can be tough work. It’s even more difficult if the two parties are superpowers at the height of Cold War tensions.

Flickr Photo/Seattle Munincipal Archives (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with James Gregory, director of the Seattle Civil Rights and Labor History Project at the University of Washington, about the history of racial exclusion in early 20th century housing covenants.

This segment originally aired May 21, 2014.

Marcie Sillman talks to Dr. Leslie Butterfield about the challenges new parents face and how to spot the signs of postpartum depression and anxiety.

One in five new moms and one in ten new dads have some form of postpartum depression. Postpartum Support International and Postpartum Support International of Washington State are resources for information about postpartum depression, as well as local support groups and counselors. You can also call the toll-free line anytime to talk to a volunteer: 1.888.404.7763.

Mark Bradley's book "A Very Principled Boy.'

David Hyde talks to author Mark Bradley about his book, "A Very Principled Boy." It's the story of Duncan Lee, who became a spy for the Soviet Union only to switch allegiance back to the United States later in his life.

Wikipedia Illustration/Tom-b (CC BY-SA)

David Hyde talks with Matthew Prince, CEO of CloudFlare, about what he says is the fastest growing cyber attack sweeping the nation: distributed denial of service, or DDoS.

Flickr Photo/Laia Ros (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Slate writer Katy Waldman about the new trend in activism called clicktivism.

Courtesy of Jennie Laird and Elisa Gautama

There will be no wedding band, no ceremony or awkward toasts. But on June 30, up to 4,000 same-sex couples in Washington are set to be married – without ever uttering the words, "I do."

The Timberbowl Rodeo, in the town of Darrington, Washington, saw some of its largest crowds ever this past weekend. Neighbors gathered at the event to hug, shake hands and heal up a bit from this year's nearby terrible Oso landslide.

Courtesy of Federal Public Defenders office.

Every sentencing comes down to two things according to attorney Michael Filipovic: Why did this person commit this crime, and why is he not going to do it again?

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

University of Washington, Allen Institute for Artificial Intelligence

When you do an image search on the web, you might find what you're looking for. Those searches use captions and other text around pictures to give you results. But what if a computer could recognize a horse because it was shaped like a horse? That's what a new program called LEVAN can do.

This story is in no way an endorsement of suicide. It's a description of one woman's choice and what came of it.

Five years ago, after doctors told her that she had Alzheimer's disease that would eventually steal her ability to read, write and recognize people, Sandy Bem decided to kill herself.

Sandy was 65 years old, an unsentimental woman and strong willed. For her, a life without books and the ability to recognize the people she loved wasn't a life she wanted.

Flickr Photo/Gary VanDerBerg (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Reverend Belladonna Laveau of the Aquarian Tabernacle Church about the pagan history behind the summer solstice and how modern Wiccans celebrate the longest day of the year.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

David Hyde talks to Fremont Solstice Parade float makers, organizers and a marching band as they get ready for the big event. 

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Marcie Sillman talks with attorney Lance Fryrear about when you can, and when you can't, be naked in Seattle.

Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with University of Washington professor Joe Janes about online reputation management.

Can You Learn To Spot A Liar?

Jun 20, 2014

Part 2 of the TED Radio Hour episode Why We Lie.

About Pamela Meyer's TEDTalk

We're surrounded by deception: in politics and pop culture, in the workplace and on social media. Pamela Meyer points out mannerisms and cues that can help us suss out a lie.

About Pamela Meyer

courtesy ACT Theatre

When Tyrone Brown was a kid, just six or seven years old, his mom took him to Seattle's 5th Avenue Theater for a performance of the long-running musical, "Annie."

"She actually just dropped me off at the theater and let me watch it by myself," Brown says.

Flickr Photo/Derrick Coetzee (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Ann McGettigan, executive director of Seattle Counseling Service, about the history of the organization and her role in the LGBT community. The program was founded in 1969, when its founder noticed that there were runaways in Pioneer Square -- many of them had been kicked out of their homes. 

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Lisa See's book "China Dolls."

Marcie Sillman interviews author Lisa See about her book, "China Dolls." It is a fictional account of Asian-American entertainers in the late 1930s through WWII that were apart of the so-called "Chop Suey Circuit."

Flickr Photo/Keith Allison (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Jay Rosenstein, journalism professor and producer of "In Whose Honor?", about the history of Indian mascots and the significance of the U.S. patent's office cancelation of the Washington Redskins' trademark.

From Wikipedia

Marcie Sillman talks with Aljazeera America journalist Kaelyn Forde about her story on the RoboBees Project and why some environmentalists want to stop it.

KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld

An African hair braider is suing the Washington State Department of Licensing after an investigator told her she needs a cosmetology license to stay in business.

The suit is one of several filed across the country on Tuesday by hair braiders protesting state regulations they say don’t apply to them.

Even if you can't keep a beat, your brain can. "The brain absolutely has rhythm," says Nathan Urban, a neuroscientist at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh.

When you concentrate, Urban says, your brain produces rapid, rhythmic electrical impulses called gamma waves. When you relax, it generates much slower alpha waves.

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has revoked the trademark of the NFL's Washington Redskins, after ruling in a case brought by five Native Americans who say the name disparages them. While the decision could have wide repercussions, it does not require the team to change its name. It is also subject to appeal, which the team has confirmed it will pursue.

Japan Bans Possession Of Child Pornography

Jun 18, 2014

Japan has banned the possession of child pornography, with some notable exceptions: manga, animation and computer graphics.

Parliament's upper house approved the measure Wednesday; the lower house passed the bill last month.

Flickr Photo/Andreas Eldh (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde interviews author David Zweig about his new book, "Invisibles: The Power Of Anonymous Work In An Age of Relentless Self-Promotion."

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