Art of Our City

Theater Premiere
9:35 am
Thu February 27, 2014

From Raised Eyebrows To Raised Curtains: Rachel Atkins Tackles Racial Identity

Actresses Kia Pierce and Marquicia Dominguez in Rachel Atkins' play, "Black Like Us."
Credit Courtesy of Annex Theatre/Shane Regan

When Rachel Atkins was 7, she and her sisters got a new stepfather. Atkins loved this man, but when she and her family went out in public, they raised a lot of eyebrows.

Read more
Performing Arts
7:37 am
Thu February 20, 2014

Choreographer Uses Blackface To Confront Racial Attitudes Past And Present

Donald Byrd's "Minstrel Show, Revisited."
Credit Courtesy Spectrum Dance Theater/Nate Watters

When choreographer Donald Byrd first presented "The Minstrel Show" more than 20 years ago, he wasn't ready for the way audiences would react. He recalls one performance in La Jolla, California, when people started yelling at each other across the theater.

Read more
Local Dance
7:30 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Choreographer Kate Wallich Spreads Her Wings With 'Super Eagle'

Kate Wallich and Andrew Bartee in "Super Eagle."
Velocity Dance Center/Jacob Rosen

When you ask Seattle dance insiders which young artists they've got their eyes on, 24-year-old Kate Wallich's name almost always rises to the top of the list.

Read more
Art Of The City
11:08 am
Thu February 6, 2014

How A Rainbow Of Plaid Pushed Robert Jones To Paint

"Garden," by Robert Jones, 2012
Courtesy of Beth Sellars

Standing in the middle of the main gallery at Cornish College of the Arts, you're surrounded by color: Artist Robert C. Jones' large paintings are vivid swaths of red and green, yellow and blue; punctuated by black lines or circles.

Read more
Seattle Theater
6:00 am
Thu January 30, 2014

New Play At Seattle Rep Examines Themes Of Secrecy, Religious Orthodoxy

Samuel Hunter's "A Great Wilderness" will play at Seattle Repertory Theater.
Credit From Seattle Repertory Theater's Facebook page

Playwright Samuel B. Hunter was never a fundamentalist Christian, but his boyhood experience at a Christian school was the inspiration for his new play, "A Great Wilderness."

Read more
Art Of Our City
7:26 am
Thu January 23, 2014

30-Year-Old Play Revived In Seattle To Combat AIDS Complacency

The lives of Mickey (Stephen Black), Ned (Greg Lyle-Netwon) and Felix (Andrew Russell) are forever affected by the scourge of AIDS in Strawberry Theatre Workshop's "The Normal Heart."
Courtesy of John Ulman

Stephen Black remembers the moment he decided to bring a play called "The Normal Heart" to Seattle.

Read more
Art Of Our City
11:55 am
Thu December 19, 2013

Francine Seders, 81, Bids Adieu To Gallery Life But Not To Art

Francine Seders, 81, is closing her gallery after 40 years.
Credit KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

On the first Thursday of every month, Pioneer Square transforms itself into a festival of visual art. Most of the commercial galleries in the neighborhood throw open their doors to welcome the moving feast of art lovers who flit from shop to shop, sipping wine and perusing the wares.

Read more
Music
4:38 pm
Thu December 12, 2013

'Indie With An Edge': Radio Raheem Mixes Gospel With Apocalyptic

Radio Raheem
Credit courtesy of Radio Raheem

Seattle is a town full of music. From indie rock to folk to rap, the city boasts a bevy of thriving scenes. These days, those scenes tend to cross-pollinate. And that can result in something powerful, especially when a traditional gospel singer is part of the mix.

Read more
Pacific Northwest Ballet
9:00 am
Thu August 15, 2013

Vaccination Rates In Washington State, Art Of Our City, Peter Boal And Pinball History!

Flickr Photo/Kryziz Bonny

Washington State Vaccination Rates
During the 2008-2009 school year, Washington state kindergarteners were the least vaccinated in the United States. The opt-out rate of at least once vaccine was 7.6 percent. According to a new report from the Centers for Disease Control, the opt-out rate has decreased to 4.6 percent. It’s a marked improvement for sure, but Washington state still has the seventh highest vaccination opt-out rate in the country. How have public health officials tackled this issue? Why is Washington state such a likely to place for parents to opt their kids out of vaccinations?

Art Of Our City
Religious leaders often talk about the role of devotion in their work, but what about artists? Or just regular people? Seattle writer Rebecca Brown has invited a range of Seattle-area folks to contemplate devotion. The result is an exhibition at the Hedreen Gallery at Seattle University. What does devotion mean in your life?

Pacific Northwest Ballet Artistic Director Peter Boal
Eight years ago the leadership changed hands at Pacific Northwest Ballet. Peter Boal came to Seattle to assume the role of PNB’s artistic director. The former New York City Ballet principal dancer was committed to PNB’s focus on the work of choreographer George Balanchine. But Boal has expanded PNB’s repertoire, bringing in much more new work and focusing on such choreographers as Twyla Tharp and Christopher Wheeldon, hot shots of contemporary dance making.

Pinball: History You Play!  
Everyone has played pinball, but do you remember that it was once banned? Producer Katy Sewall visits the Seattle Pinball Museum to find the stories behind the fun. Why was the “tilt” invented? What recurring themes show up year after year? How has the sound of pinball changed through the decades?

Seattle Opera
9:00 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Providing Equal Health Care, Art Of Our City, And The Interfaith Amigos

Seattle Opera's audience seated in McCaw Hall are certainly awed by the "Ring" production, but probably can't imagine all the backstage work it requires.
Credit Flickr Photo/Felipe Fortes

Providing Equal Health Care
The Human Rights Campaign released its 2013 Healthcare Equality Index. The HEI is a survey of how health care facilities treat patients from the LGBT community. Both UW Medicine and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance were recognized for being  a “leader in LGBT health care equality." What does it mean to provide LGBT patient-centered care? Nicki McCraw, the assistant vice president of human resources for UW Medicine explains.  

Art Of Our City
This year could be the last time audiences see Seattle Opera’s current production of the Ring Cycle.  The four-part opera marathon is the story of Norse gods and goddesses, love and greed. The final opera, “Twilight of the Gods," ends with the destruction of the world as the gods and goddesses know it. What does it take to end the world?  Seattle Opera technical director Robert Schaub knows. He’s the man who helped turn the artistic vision into stage reality. Schaub took Marcie Sillman behind the scenes and then sat down to talk about theater magic.

The Interfaith Amigos On The Role Of Ritual
All of us have rituals we engage in.  Maybe you eat lunch at the same restaurant every day.  Maybe you celebrate the holidays each year in a similar manner.  How important is ritual to the human experience? The Interfaith Amigos muse on this subject.

Read more
Pot, Boeing And Art
9:00 am
Thu July 25, 2013

DEA Raids Pot Dispensaries, Art Of Our City, Boeing, Losing Art Collections

Seattle Art Museum's collection is privately owned, unlike the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. But it begs the question: What would Seattle look like without its cultural icons?
Flickr Photo/Alex Abboud and illustration by Kara McDermott

DEA Raids Puget Sound Pot Dispensaries
Federal drug enforcement agents raided marijuana dispensaries around Puget Sound on Wednesday afternoon. We’ll bring you the latest and speak with Alison Holcomb of the ACLU of Washington.

Art Of Our City: Precious Little
What are the limits of language? Sometimes we speak better when we communicate without traditional words or vocabularies. That’s one of the themes of Madeline George’s play “Precious Little.” It opens August 2 at Seattle’s Annex Theater. Director Katherine Karaus and cast members give us a taste of the play and talk about the role of language onstage and in life.

Update On Boeing
Boeing’s profit is up 13 percent, despite the troubles the company has been facing lately. The Boeing 787, 737 and 777 have all been in the headlines for fires and faulty landings. Boeing is looking for fixes to the problems as the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board continue to investigate the Asiana 214 crash in San Francisco, the 787 fire at Heathrow airport and the Southwest crash at LaGuardia. Christopher Drew, the Pentagon and aerospace reporter for the New York Times explains the latest news from Boeing.

What Does It Mean For A City To Lose Its Art Collection?
When the city of Detroit declared bankruptcy last week, creditors began to eye existing assets. One stood out: The art collection at the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. Appraisers put its value at roughly $2.5 billion. But is it that easy to sell off a cultural collection to pay off a city’s debt? And what does it mean to a city to lose that cultural collection? Seattle Art Museum Director Kimerly Rorshach explains some of the intangibles when it comes to valuing art.

Read more
New ACT Play
9:00 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Art Of Our City, And Home Repair With Roger Faris

From ACT Theatre's Facebook page.

"Rapture, Blister, Burn"
Do women always have to make a choice between career or family? Gina Gionfriddo’s new play “Rapture, Blister, Burn” is a modern take on that old feminist question. Actress Kristen Potter plays a character who chooses work over kids. Potter tells us whether she feels like she’s had to make that same choice in her real life.

Home Repair Help With Roger Faris
Summertime is the best time to do those outdoor home repair projects. Got a question? Home repair expert Roger Faris can probably answer it. 

Read more
Arts and Entertainment
8:08 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Rep. Adam Smith, Intiman Theatre, Sub Pop Turns 25

Rep. Adam Smith
WA-09 Congressman Adam Smith joins us to talk about the battle over immigration in the House of Representatives, American aid to Egypt and new calls to close Guantanamo Bay.

Art Of Our City: Seattle’s Intiman Theatre
This month Seattle’s Intiman Theatre launches its second year as a leaner and meaner summer festival.  Intiman needs to entice audiences and funders to its four-play festival. Artistic Director Andrew Russell hopes more comedy and more sharp political commentary will help bring them in the door.  The theater company’s future depends on it.

Sub Pop Turns 25
Once upon a time, Seattle’s Sub Pop Records was a brassy upstart label. This weekend the company celebrates its 25th anniversary. How has the company that put Seattle on the music world’s map changed over a quarter of a century? We’ll ask co-founder Jonathan Poneman.

Read more
Divorced Band
9:00 am
Thu June 27, 2013

US Relations With Africa, Two Queensryches, And Seattle Transgender Pride

Chaos is right! Seattle band Queensryche has split into two entities, making the future of the Queensryche banner uncertain.
From Queensryche's Facebook page.

President Obama Visits Africa
President Obama is making his third and longest trip to Africa, his first visit since winning reelection. The president intends to “reinforce the US' commitment to expanding economic growth” in Africa. We talk with Witney Schneidman, nonresident fellow with the Africa Growth Initiative.

Art Of Our City: Dueling Queensrÿches
Fans of the Seattle band Queensrÿche have a lot be psyched about this week: a brand new album and two live shows. Queensrÿche performed last night at The Crocodile, and they’ll perform again this Saturday night at The Moore. Problem is, it’s actually two different bands, both using the name Queensrÿche. Following a huge fight last summer, the band split in two. What’s going on here? Decibel Magazine editor-in-chief Albert Mudrian helps us sort it out.

Seattle Transgender Pride
The Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act this week, paving the way for same-sex married couples to receive the same federal rights and protections afforded to heterosexuals. The ruling is celebrated within the LGBT community as a huge step towards equality. But for transgender people – the T in LGBT – discrimination and inequality is still a very real and pressing threat across the country.

Read more
Public Art
9:00 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Art Of Our City, And Dan Savage

Dan Savage's book "American Savage," photo by © LaRae Lobdell

Art Of Our City
You may not know his name, but you’ve probably seen Seattle-based artist Buster Simpson’s work.  On First Avenue, you’ll find a couple of stone benches made by Simpson more than three decades ago, partly so the Belltown homeless people would have a place to sit.  He’s installed some creative downspouts on buildings on Belltown’s Vine Street, part of an unrealized project that would crack open the asphalt that covers the street and turn Vine into a green belt that runs into Elliot Bay.  Buster Simpson almost always works in public, and almost always addresses issues that affect our natural and built environment.  The Frye Museum has mounted a 40 year retrospective.  It’s called “Buster Simpson: Surveyor.”

Dan Savage On Faith, Sex, Love And Politics
Dan Savage is an author, activist and nationally syndicated columnist. He writes the weekly “Savage Love” column and hosts Savage Lovecast, one of the most downloaded podcasts on iTunes. In 2010, Savage and his husband Terry Miller launched the It Gets Better online video project to help LGBT teens. In his latest book “American Savage: Insights, Slights, and Fights on Faith, Sex, Love, and Politics,” he explores issues such as health care, gun control, marriage equality and more. 

Pages