Art of Our City

Seattle Opera
9:00 am
Thu August 1, 2013

Providing Equal Health Care, Art Of Our City, And The Interfaith Amigos

Seattle Opera's audience seated in McCaw Hall are certainly awed by the "Ring" production, but probably can't imagine all the backstage work it requires.
Credit Flickr Photo/Felipe Fortes

Providing Equal Health Care
The Human Rights Campaign released its 2013 Healthcare Equality Index. The HEI is a survey of how health care facilities treat patients from the LGBT community. Both UW Medicine and Seattle Cancer Care Alliance were recognized for being  a “leader in LGBT health care equality." What does it mean to provide LGBT patient-centered care? Nicki McCraw, the assistant vice president of human resources for UW Medicine explains.  

Art Of Our City
This year could be the last time audiences see Seattle Opera’s current production of the Ring Cycle.  The four-part opera marathon is the story of Norse gods and goddesses, love and greed. The final opera, “Twilight of the Gods," ends with the destruction of the world as the gods and goddesses know it. What does it take to end the world?  Seattle Opera technical director Robert Schaub knows. He’s the man who helped turn the artistic vision into stage reality. Schaub took Marcie Sillman behind the scenes and then sat down to talk about theater magic.

The Interfaith Amigos On The Role Of Ritual
All of us have rituals we engage in.  Maybe you eat lunch at the same restaurant every day.  Maybe you celebrate the holidays each year in a similar manner.  How important is ritual to the human experience? The Interfaith Amigos muse on this subject.

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Pot, Boeing And Art
9:00 am
Thu July 25, 2013

DEA Raids Pot Dispensaries, Art Of Our City, Boeing, Losing Art Collections

Seattle Art Museum's collection is privately owned, unlike the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. But it begs the question: What would Seattle look like without its cultural icons?
Flickr Photo/Alex Abboud and illustration by Kara McDermott

DEA Raids Puget Sound Pot Dispensaries
Federal drug enforcement agents raided marijuana dispensaries around Puget Sound on Wednesday afternoon. We’ll bring you the latest and speak with Alison Holcomb of the ACLU of Washington.

Art Of Our City: Precious Little
What are the limits of language? Sometimes we speak better when we communicate without traditional words or vocabularies. That’s one of the themes of Madeline George’s play “Precious Little.” It opens August 2 at Seattle’s Annex Theater. Director Katherine Karaus and cast members give us a taste of the play and talk about the role of language onstage and in life.

Update On Boeing
Boeing’s profit is up 13 percent, despite the troubles the company has been facing lately. The Boeing 787, 737 and 777 have all been in the headlines for fires and faulty landings. Boeing is looking for fixes to the problems as the Federal Aviation Administration and National Transportation Safety Board continue to investigate the Asiana 214 crash in San Francisco, the 787 fire at Heathrow airport and the Southwest crash at LaGuardia. Christopher Drew, the Pentagon and aerospace reporter for the New York Times explains the latest news from Boeing.

What Does It Mean For A City To Lose Its Art Collection?
When the city of Detroit declared bankruptcy last week, creditors began to eye existing assets. One stood out: The art collection at the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. Appraisers put its value at roughly $2.5 billion. But is it that easy to sell off a cultural collection to pay off a city’s debt? And what does it mean to a city to lose that cultural collection? Seattle Art Museum Director Kimerly Rorshach explains some of the intangibles when it comes to valuing art.

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New ACT Play
9:00 am
Thu July 18, 2013

Art Of Our City, And Home Repair With Roger Faris

From ACT Theatre's Facebook page.

"Rapture, Blister, Burn"
Do women always have to make a choice between career or family? Gina Gionfriddo’s new play “Rapture, Blister, Burn” is a modern take on that old feminist question. Actress Kristen Potter plays a character who chooses work over kids. Potter tells us whether she feels like she’s had to make that same choice in her real life.

Home Repair Help With Roger Faris
Summertime is the best time to do those outdoor home repair projects. Got a question? Home repair expert Roger Faris can probably answer it. 

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Arts and Entertainment
8:08 am
Thu July 11, 2013

Rep. Adam Smith, Intiman Theatre, Sub Pop Turns 25

Rep. Adam Smith
WA-09 Congressman Adam Smith joins us to talk about the battle over immigration in the House of Representatives, American aid to Egypt and new calls to close Guantanamo Bay.

Art Of Our City: Seattle’s Intiman Theatre
This month Seattle’s Intiman Theatre launches its second year as a leaner and meaner summer festival.  Intiman needs to entice audiences and funders to its four-play festival. Artistic Director Andrew Russell hopes more comedy and more sharp political commentary will help bring them in the door.  The theater company’s future depends on it.

Sub Pop Turns 25
Once upon a time, Seattle’s Sub Pop Records was a brassy upstart label. This weekend the company celebrates its 25th anniversary. How has the company that put Seattle on the music world’s map changed over a quarter of a century? We’ll ask co-founder Jonathan Poneman.

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Divorced Band
9:00 am
Thu June 27, 2013

US Relations With Africa, Two Queensryches, And Seattle Transgender Pride

Chaos is right! Seattle band Queensryche has split into two entities, making the future of the Queensryche banner uncertain.
From Queensryche's Facebook page.

President Obama Visits Africa
President Obama is making his third and longest trip to Africa, his first visit since winning reelection. The president intends to “reinforce the US' commitment to expanding economic growth” in Africa. We talk with Witney Schneidman, nonresident fellow with the Africa Growth Initiative.

Art Of Our City: Dueling Queensrÿches
Fans of the Seattle band Queensrÿche have a lot be psyched about this week: a brand new album and two live shows. Queensrÿche performed last night at The Crocodile, and they’ll perform again this Saturday night at The Moore. Problem is, it’s actually two different bands, both using the name Queensrÿche. Following a huge fight last summer, the band split in two. What’s going on here? Decibel Magazine editor-in-chief Albert Mudrian helps us sort it out.

Seattle Transgender Pride
The Supreme Court struck down the Defense of Marriage Act this week, paving the way for same-sex married couples to receive the same federal rights and protections afforded to heterosexuals. The ruling is celebrated within the LGBT community as a huge step towards equality. But for transgender people – the T in LGBT – discrimination and inequality is still a very real and pressing threat across the country.

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Public Art
9:00 am
Thu June 13, 2013

Art Of Our City, And Dan Savage

Dan Savage's book "American Savage," photo by © LaRae Lobdell

Art Of Our City
You may not know his name, but you’ve probably seen Seattle-based artist Buster Simpson’s work.  On First Avenue, you’ll find a couple of stone benches made by Simpson more than three decades ago, partly so the Belltown homeless people would have a place to sit.  He’s installed some creative downspouts on buildings on Belltown’s Vine Street, part of an unrealized project that would crack open the asphalt that covers the street and turn Vine into a green belt that runs into Elliot Bay.  Buster Simpson almost always works in public, and almost always addresses issues that affect our natural and built environment.  The Frye Museum has mounted a 40 year retrospective.  It’s called “Buster Simpson: Surveyor.”

Dan Savage On Faith, Sex, Love And Politics
Dan Savage is an author, activist and nationally syndicated columnist. He writes the weekly “Savage Love” column and hosts Savage Lovecast, one of the most downloaded podcasts on iTunes. In 2010, Savage and his husband Terry Miller launched the It Gets Better online video project to help LGBT teens. In his latest book “American Savage: Insights, Slights, and Fights on Faith, Sex, Love, and Politics,” he explores issues such as health care, gun control, marriage equality and more. 

Health
8:43 am
Thu May 16, 2013

No Sonics This Time, Art Of Our City, And The Book Of Woe

Darian Asplund and Ahkeenu Musa with the band Kore Ionz played a gig in Seattle wearing their Sonics gear, May 15.
KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

The Kings Stay In Sacramento
The inevitable was confirmed yesterday in Dallas by NBA commissioner David Stern. In a 22-8 vote, the NBA Board of Governors voted to keep the Sacramento Kings in Sacramento. Investor Chris Hansen said the struggle makes the payoff sweeter and that he hopes the Sonics will return to Seattle eventually. We’ll talk with Ben Adler from Capital Public Radio in Sacramento and Art Thiel in Seattle on how the decision came to be.

Art Of Our City: The Massive Monkees
Earlier this year the hip-hop dance troupe Massive Monkees opened their first official dance studio, called the Beacon.  As part of a Seattle program to invigorate empty storefronts in the city, the Monkees applied for and received a three-month residency in a storefront in the Chinatown-International District.  Over the course of that residency, the Beacon offered classes for students as young as three up to their 50s and beyond. Now Massive Monkees' official residency is over, but they have the opportunity to make the Beacon permanent.  The landlord has agreed to a longer lease with one catch:  They need to raise some money for capital repairs.  To that end, they’ve launched a Kickstarter campaign. We revisit a tour we took to the Beacon in February of this year.

The Book Of Woe
The American Psychiatric Association is currently revising the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, a tool used by clinicians to diagnose patients with mental disorders. According to Gary Greenberg it is more like an “anthology of suffering.” Greenberg is a psychotherapist and author of the new book, “The Book of Woe: The DSM and the Unmaking of Psychiatry.” In his book he explains the history of the DSM and how the current revision of the DSM-5 is, as he argues, the most flawed yet. He says the DSM turns suffering into a commodity, leading to over- and misdiagnosis of mental illness.

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Arts and Entertainment
9:00 am
Thu May 9, 2013

Park Plans, Art Of Our City, And Ripley’s “Believe It Or Not!”

"We Are All Failing Them"

Seattle Parks Plan
Seattle officials want to hear from you about the future of the city’s parks. They're holding meetings this month to get public input on a parks plan that will guide where the city directs its resources in the years to come. We hear more from City Councilmember Sally Bagshaw.

Art Of Our City
A new live music and film project explores the line between ambition and bad luck as it applied to the Donner Party. "We Are All Failing Them" is a new commission by Seattle’s Northwest Film Forum (teaser below). It’s a song cycle performed live to film. We talk with composer Robin Holcomb about the latest venture in her wide-ranging career.

Neal Thompson On Robert “Believe It Or Not!” Ripley
A 1936 newspaper poll declared Robert Ripley the most popular man in America. How did a young, awkward newspaper cartoonist become a worldwide adventurer synonymous with the strange and unusual? Official Ripley biographer  Neal Thompson joins us.

Arts & Entertainment
9:00 am
Thu April 25, 2013

Electric Cars, Isabel Allende, And President Obama's Sister

Cover of "Maya's Notebook" by Isabel Allende.

Electric Car Company Under Congressional Scrutiny
Fisker Automotive is the latest beneficiary of the Obama Administration’s push for renewable energy to flounder. The electric car startup recently fired 75 percent of its workforce and hired bankruptcy advisers. Congress is asking questions about the propriety of federal loans to the politically well-connected company.

A Conversation With Writer Isabel Allende
Isabel Allende is a world-renowned writer, with 19 books in 35 languages. Her latest is "Maya’s Notebook," a tale that revolves around a descent into addiction and a rebirth through the love of family and place.

A Conversation With President Obama’s Sister, Maya Saetoro-Ng
A famous sibling can be a blessing or a burden. Maya Saetoro-Ng is the half-sister of President Obama. She uses her perspective as a history teacher to analyze how her brother’s presidency will be remembered.

Seattle Theater’s Power Couple
Seattle theater audiences know R. Hamilton “Bob” Wright from his long career onstage acting and of late, directing. Wright’s wife, Katie Forgette, is also a fixture on Seattle stages as an actress and now a playwright. Forgette’s newest play has opened at ACT Theatre directed by husband Bob Wright.

Public Safety
9:00 am
Thu April 18, 2013

Behind The Scenes With SPD's Bomb Unit

A bomb squad exercise.
Credit Flickr Photo/Settsu

Investigators are trying to piece together this week's bombings at the Boston Marathon. What clues are they looking for? How are bombs detected and disarmed? Seattle Police Department explosives experts Randy Curtis and Craig Williamson join us with an inside look. Call with your questions to 206.543.5869.


VIDEO: Watch Dennis the SPD Bomb Dog In Action

Science & Philosophy
9:00 am
Thu March 28, 2013

Howard Bloom On How A Godless Cosmos Creates

Author and scientific thinker Howard Bloom.
Credit Photo Courtesy/Wikipedia

How does the universe create itself out of nothing, then keep going for billions of remarkable, evolving millennia? Can you even have "nothing," or do you have to bring God into the equation? These are the kinds of questions that arise when you're trying to explain the origin of life in the universe. Questions that Howard Bloom — science prodigy, former PR man for Prince, friend of Buzz Aldrin — tackles in his new book, “The God Problem.”

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Politics
9:00 am
Thu March 7, 2013

Winning The White House In 2016

White House.
Credit Flickr Photo/Ivan Makarov

In an interview with Fox News earlier this week, Mitt Romney said that failing to reach minority voters was his biggest mistake of the 2012 campaign. What will it take to win the next election? UW Professor David Domke says winning over voters in so-called "carve-out states" — Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada — will be one key to victory. He joins us with rules of the road for winning the White House in 2016.

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Federal Politics
9:00 am
Thu February 7, 2013

What Should Sally Jewell Do As Interior Secretary?

REI CEO Sally Jewell.

President Obama has nominated REI executive Sally Jewell for Secretary of the Interior.  What should she focus on if she is confirmed?  How should she manage the vast public lands that would be in her portfolio? We talk with local experts and conservationists. Join the discussion by emailing weekday@kuow.org.

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Personal Finance
9:00 am
Thu January 31, 2013

Your Housing Questions Answered

House for sale.
Credit Flickr photo/Ian Muttoo

The housing market is showing signs of recovery and construction has started once again on developments delayed by the recession. That doesn’t mean everyone is in good shape. Many homeowners remain underwater, with home values nowhere near the purchase price. Then there are the questions about refinancing or buying something new. Real estate and housing experts Richard Hagar and Linda Taylor are here to help. Call 206.543.5869 with your questions or send us an email at weekday@kuow.org.

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Arts & Entertainment
9:00 am
Thu January 24, 2013

A Conversation With Saxophonist Kenny G

Jazz musician Kenny G poses for a portrait at Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York.
Credit AP Photo/ Jim Cooper



Sax man and bestselling instrumentalist of all time, Kenny G, needs no introduction. Following stints with Barry White’s Love Unlimited Orchestra (at the age of 17) and The Jeff Lorber Fusion, the Seattle native and UW grad embarked on a solo career in the early 1980s. His 1992 album "Breathless" is the bestselling instrumental album of all time, and his 1994 album "Miracles" is the bestselling Christmas album of all time. He's collaborated with musical legends from Aretha Franklin to Stevie Wonder and even popped up in a Katy Perry video. The one and only Kenny G is in town to perform at Seattle's Jazz Alley. He joins us for a conversation about his life in music.

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