Apple

Flickr Photo/Fabien Lavocat (CC BY-NC-ND)

Jeannie Yandel talks with  Todd Bishop, co-founder of GeekWire, about Microsoft's fate in the sea of successful tech giants.

Flickr Photo/MaxVT (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with GeekWire co-founder Todd Bishop about this week's tech news, including recent praise for Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos and Apple moving work into the Seattle area.

Marcie Sillman talks to Todd Bishop, co-founder of Geekwire, about the new Amazon Fire phone, Apple's new wearables and other tech news.

David Hyde and Todd Bishop of Geekwire discuss the latest tech news: Apple announces a new operating service, brick and mortar stores take advantage of the Amazon and Hachette dispute, and a local startup creates a new app to guide you through Seattle museums.

On a Wisconsin street, a woman in a white hoodie stands frozen in the act of stepping out of the road and onto the curb, her left hand reaching behind her. As part of a public service announcement, she explains why she's there, as string music slowly plays under her voice.

"I had my brother in my hand, and all of a sudden my hand was empty," Aurie says as a car drives past. Her little brother, 8 years old at the time of the PSA, was left paralyzed after being hit by a car driven by a texting driver.

Fred Vogelstein's book "Dogfight."

David Hyde talks with Wired contributing editor Fred Vogelstein about his new book "Dogfight: How Google and Apple Went to War and Started a Revolution."  The book chronicles the contentious relationship between Apple's Steve Jobs and Google's Eric Schmidt and shows how it has shaped smartphone and tablet technology.

Flickr Photo/Vernon Chan

Microsoft servers around the world are dishing out a new version of Windows 8. The new version brings back a start button, something users said they missed.

A lot is riding on the success of the operating system, which is the backbone of Microsoft’s transformation into a devices company. It’s Microsoft’s effort to create a single experience for all Microsoft devices, from smartphone to tablet to laptop.

Last week, Apple introduced two new iPhones with new features, including fingerprint recognition on one model, and extra password protections. But the new technology is up against a sophisticated black market that has had years to grow and adapt to meet the world's desire for smartphones.

To call smartphone-related crime an epidemic is not an exaggeration. By one estimate, more than 4,000 phones are stolen every day in the United States.

Flickr Photo/cwnewserpics

Two new iPhones are hitting the market later in September. The upscale iPhone 5S, and the cheaper iPhone 5C . But will the iPhone 5c be cheap enough?

There used to be a time when a new iPhone meant a jump in Apple’s stock. This time, not so much. Apple's stock fell 5 percent due to concerns that the new  iPhone 5C is not cheap enough to compete with Google's Android phones, which currently lead the pack. Joining us to talk tech is Todd Bishop co-founder of the independent technology news site and online community Geekwire.

Apple unveiled its replacement for the iPhone 5 — one for the top end of the market that features an innovative new fingerprint security device, a faster processor and longer battery life; and a second budget phone that will retail for as low as $99.

CEO Tim Cook was joined by other Apple executives at the Cupertino, Calif., headquarters for the long-anticipated and hyped announcement of the iPhone 5s and iPhone 5c.

Flickr Photo/Vernon Chan

Microsoft’s $7 billion purchase of Nokia’s mobile device business is an important step toward gaining ground in the worldwide smartphone market, analysts say.

But bigger challenges await as the company works to get consumers to love the Windows Phone.

Cyberattacks on dozens of American companies have been traced to an area on the outskirts of Shanghai that houses a Chinese military unit, according to a report out Tuesday by Mandiant, a U.S. cybersecurity company.

The 60-page document, first reported by The New York Times, says the group behind the attacks — nicknamed "Comment Crew" — is the most prolific the company has ever tracked and has been hacking U.S. companies since at least 2006.

Mandiant says the hackers' real identity is Unit 61398 of China's People's Liberation Army, or PLA.