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KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

KUOW's Bill Radke reviews the week's news in front of a live audience at the Center for Wooden Boats on the shores of Lake Union with Joni Balter, Knute Berger, Sherman Alexie and Luke Burbank.

The panel discusses:

  • The eyes of America turn to Ferguson, Missouri, after a police shooting. Are there any parallels to the police response to WTO in Seattle?
  • The publishing war between Amazon and Hatchette heats up. Spoiler alert: Our authorial guest has a stake in the outcome.
  • Steve Ballmer buys the LA Clippers.
  • And the Internet lights up with people dumping ice water on their heads — for a good cause.

Flickr Photo/Lynn Gardner (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Geoffrey Fowler, personal technology columnist for the Wall Street Journal, about the advantages and challenges libraries have  in the e-book market.

Flickr Photo/Neon Tommy (CC-BY-NC-ND) and Mark Coggins (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Seattle area novelists Maria Semple ("Where'd You Go Bernadette") and Robert Dugoni ("The Jury Master"), who are on either side of a literary feud between Amazon and Hachette, a major publishing house. 

Hachette authors say Amazon is retaliating by making it harder for people to buy their books. Amazon supporters say they want to keep prices low for consumers.

Amazon.com logo
Flickr Photo/Guillermo Esteves (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds and Todd Bishop of Geekwire discuss the latest tech news. Amazon is in a battle with Hatchete over books and with Disney over the pre-order option on movies yet to be released. Also, data from an app suggests that, yes, there does appear to be a "Seattle freeze."

Courtesy GeekWire

Go to a box store, hold your phone up to an item, and – ding! – your phone tells you how much the same item would cost on Amazon Prime.

Jeannie Yandel talks with business writer and Page 2 Books co-owner Bill Virgin about Amazon's new unlimited book subscription service, Kindle Unlimited.

Amazon handout

Amazon, the world’s largest online retailer, is seeking permission to send unmanned aircraft into the skies. The company has asked the Federal Aviation Administration for permission to test its delivery-by-drone system.

The Seattle retailer has been testing drones indoors in Seattle, but it needs a federal exemption to test them outside. The company tells the FAA it wants to test drones on its own property “near Seattle.”

Flickr Photo/BagoGames (CC BY 2.0)

Ross Reynolds talks to Todd Bishop of Geekwire about Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella's 3,200 word, company-wide memo.

Bishop picked out one key section of the missive: Nadella’s pursuit of streamlining the company’s engineering processes and being more responsive to the market and customers’ demands.

Marcie Sillman talks to Todd Bishop about Amazon's new phone and the company's Prime music service. Also, tehy discuss  Seattle a booming tech city? The New York Times thinks so.

Flickr Photo/Nic Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Bill Radke talks with New York Times tech writer David Streitfeld about the ongoing tussle between Amazon and a handful of its suppliers. The company is blocking preorders and slowing shipments of some items as it negotiates.

Courtesy Jillian Smith

A shooting on the campus of Seattle Pacific University on Thursday left one person dead and two others seriously injured. Seattle made history this week as the first city in the country to establish a $15 minimum wage for all workers. And the controversy surrounding Amazon's business practices continued to attract national media attention.

Steve Scher recaps those stories and more news of the week with Crosscut's Knute Berger, The Stranger's Eli Sanders, news analyst Joni Balter and Live Wire's Luke Burbank.

Week In Review Extra

President Obama this week announced new rules that would lead to a reduction in carbon emissions from U.S. power plants. He proposed new Environmental Protection Agency rules to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 30 percent by 2030. Is America up to the challenge?

David Hyde and Todd Bishop of Geekwire discuss the latest tech news: Apple announces a new operating service, brick and mortar stores take advantage of the Amazon and Hachette dispute, and a local startup creates a new app to guide you through Seattle museums.

Flickr Photo/Matt Hollingsworth (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks to Geekwire's Todd Bishop about AT&T's move to acquire DirecTV, Amazon's first children's show and the release of the video game Halo 5.

Bill Gates.
Flickr Photo/Thomas Hawk (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks to Geekwire's Todd Bishop about the latest news in northwest tech, including Bill Gates no longer being the largest shareholder of Microsoft and Amazon's efforts to expand same-day delivery.

Technically, consumers are supposed to pay taxes on things they buy online. In fact, few do.

Congress is considering a bill called the Marketplace Fairness Act that would force many online sellers to collect sales taxes for the first time.

In the meantime, some states have already enacted so-called Amazon taxes, forcing the giant online retailer to collect sales taxes the same way traditional brick-and-mortar stores do.

Flickr Photo/Tayla Lyell (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about the Northwest tech industry and how the updates to Microsoft's Windows Phone 8.1 will impact its place in the growing smartphone market.

Flickr Photo/Andy (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with behavioral economist Uri Gneezy about company incentives and why Amazon is implementing the "Pay to Quit" program.

Say Goodbye To Windows XP

Apr 7, 2014
Flickr Photo/DrJohnBullas (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about Northwest tech news, including the end of Windows XP, an update for Windows 8 and how tech companies are trying to make their mark on television and movies.

The inside of the elevators at Amazon headquarters in Seattle. People who work at Amazon refer to themselves as Amazonians.
Flickr File Photo/cheukiecfu CC BY-NC-ND: http://bit.ly/1MUXs0y

Steve Scher talks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about the region's tech news including Amazon's decision to raise the price of Amazon Prime membership dues from $79 a year to $99.

Seattle 2013: A Year In Protest

Dec 30, 2013
Heather Villanueva

As we looked back on the last year, debating which stories to highlight here, we noticed a trend that surprised us: 2013 was a year of activism and protest in the Seattle area.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

Outside Amazon’s headquarters in South Lake Union on Monday, activists chanted in German, “Wir sind Menchen; nicht Roboter.”

Translation: “We are people, not robots.”  

Flickr Photo/Ted Leung

What happens when you become a star and then you’re not anymore? Where do you go after that?

Seattle guitarist Dave Dederer was a member of The Presidents of the United States of America. In the '90s they had three top-40 hits, two Grammy nominations and a platinum album.

Dederer’s star has faded but his career hasn’t. Now he’s at Amazon as the head of music programming. Bill Radke asked Dederer what made him switch careers.

Amazon is looking at drastically reducing its delivery times — to 30 minutes or less — as it plans a new service called Prime Air that it says could debut in a few years. In an interview on CBS' 60 Minutes, CEO Jeff Bezos said the giant online retailer plans to use semi-autonomous drones to carry purchases to customers.

That's got tech experts buzzing about whether the idea will fly.

Flickr Photo/Ron Doke

Amazon has partnered with the United States Postal Service to offer Sunday package delivery in New York City and Los Angeles. The initiative is believed to be mutually beneficial. The USPS gets to expand one of the only areas where it is actually making money – package shipment. Amazon can more closely compete with the brick and mortar stores that boast Sunday hours.

Amazon's business is built on three basic concepts: faster delivery, greater selection, and cheaper prices.

In service of that, it has built enormous warehouses staffed largely by robots that shuttle around, pulling goods out of bins at remarkable speed. It can take just a matter of minutes to go from order to shipment.

And lately it's pursuing a program where Amazon goes directly into manufacturers and manages their logistics and online retailing.

The inside of the elevators at Amazon headquarters in Seattle. People who work at Amazon refer to themselves as Amazonians.
Flickr File Photo/cheukiecfu CC BY-NC-ND: http://bit.ly/1MUXs0y

There was big news from our region’s tech giants this week: Microsoft's profits are up nearly 17 percent over the past year, and Amazon now has more than 110,000 employees — passing Microsoft for the first time ever.

Nick Wingfield covers technology for The New York Times. He talks with Marcie Sillman about the latest tech news coming out of Seattle.

Brad Stone's book "The Everything Store."

Amazon is envisioned as a one-stop shop for anything you might wish to buy. Jeff Bezos is the overseer of the massive website, keeping a heavy finger on operations, staying focused on the customer and thinking on a very long time scale. Journalist Brad Stone profiles Bezos in his new book, “The Everything Store.” He talks with Steve Scher.

KUOW Photo/Jake Warga

Technology companies have been among the bright spots for job growth in the region. They are hiring a lot of one particular kind of employee—software engineers. Those are the people who design, develop and test systems and software.

AP Photo/Reed Saxon

Amazon founder Jeff Bezos has purchased the Washington Post for $250 million, and that has a lot of people wondering what's next for the legacy media company.

Brad Stone, senior writer for Bloomberg Businessweek, has written a book about the mega-entrepreneur. It's called, "The Everything Store,” due out in October. He said the sale was a surprise for many, but in keeping with the way Bezos thinks.

KUOW Photo

Brian Carver is one of two candidates challenging 16-year incumbent Richard Conlin in the August 6 primary. The other is Socialist Alternative Party candidate Kshama Sawant.

Carver holds the title principle product manager at Amazon's Kindle direct publishing division. He has an MBA and an engineering master's degree from the University of Washington.

Carver ran unsuccessfully for an open City Council seat in 2009. He's been a local Democratic Party activist in the 43rd Legislative District. He says improving the city's schools is his top priority.

On the web:

Brian Carver's campaign website

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