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Amazon

Amazon announced on Thursday that it’s adding 100,000 jobs nationwide by the middle of 2018.

It's a huge growth spurt for the Seattle-based company. The hiring will boost Amazon's U.S. workforce from 180,000 to 280,000 people in just 18 months time. The company had just 30,000 workers back in 2010.

Fast shipping and now fashion from Amazon

Jan 8, 2017

When you think of Amazon.com, fast shipping may come mind, but does fashion?

The equity research firm Cowen and Company estimates that Amazon's share of the apparel and accessory market last year was 6.6 percent and will keep climbing. 

And the retail behemoth has been developing several in-house brands, for items like kids' clothing and men's shirts.. It also recently posted some "brand manager" positions for a private label active wear line.

Click the above audio player to hear the full story.

Amazon's personal assistant device called Echo was one of the most popular gifts this Christmas. But this week, the device grabbed headlines for another reason: Police in Arkansas are trying to use its data in a murder investigation.

Amazon released an online ad for their convenience store, Amazon Go.
Screenshot from YouTube

Bill Radke speaks with Forbes staff writer Ryan Mac about Amazon's announcement that they'll open a convenience store with no checkout. Mac says to check your excitement and take the announcement with a grain of salt. 

Presidential candidate Donald Trump, pictured here 2013 Conservative Political Action Conference.
Flickr Photo/Gage Skidmore (CC BY SA 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/e41ELr

Deb Wang speaks with Seattle Times economics columnist Jon Talton about the economic promises President-elect Trump made during the campaign and how local businesses like Boeing and Amazon might be affected by them.

Boeing
Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor (CC BY-NC-ND)/https://flic.kr/p/7C1E9w

Bill Radke speaks with Emily Parkhurst, editor in chief of the Puget Sound Business Journal, about what a Donald Trump administration means for local businesses. 

Amazon.com
Flickr Photo/Soumit Nandi (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1VOQgCK

Bill Radke speaks with Julia Angwin, ProPublica reporter and author of the article "Amazon says it puts customers first. But its pricing algorithm doesn't."

Todd Bishop of GeekWire
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Bill Radke talks to Todd Bishop of Geekwire about this mysterious "Project X" in Ballard and why he thinks it's the home of a new drive-through grocery store. 

Birkenstocks
Flickr Photo/Simon D (CC BY NC ND 2.0)/https://flic.kr/p/f6vQ64

Bill Radke speaks with Todd Bishop about why Birkenstock has decided to stop selling their iconic shoes through Amazon's online marketplace.

Todd Bishop uses Amazon Dash to keep on top of his young son's Play-Doh needs.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke speaks with Geekwire's Todd Bishop about Nintendo's surprise success in Pokemon Go and Amazon Dash's foray into toys. 

Varsha Raghavan, backstage at Cafe Nordo in Seattle's Pioneer Square
KUOW Photo/Marcie Sillman

Varsha Raghavan defies the tech-bro stereotype.

For one thing, as a woman, technically she’s not a bro. And while Raghavan works as an Amazon programmer, she isn’t obsessed with all things computer.

Britain's decision to leave the European Union is shaking investor confidence around the world. Stocks plunged, staged a minor rebound and then trailed downward as the uncertainty caused by the Brexit vote sunk in.


Amazon cracks down on fake customer reviews

Jun 7, 2016
Todd Bishop and KUOW's Bill Radke geek out over nausea-free virtual reality in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Bill Radke speaks with Geekwire editor Todd Bishop about Amazon suing over fake reviews being posted on the site. The online store is also cracking down on people who pay for fake positive reviews.

Courtesy of New York Times/Evan McGlinn

Bill Radke speaks with Kirk Johnson, Seattle bureau chief at The New York Times, about the families he met while reporting a story on Mary's Place Guest Rooms, a new shelter for homeless families in South Lake Union.

Amazon plans to put offices next year in this former Travelodge in downtown Seattle. Until then, it will act as a shelter operated by Mary's Place.
Google Maps

Homeless families in Seattle will start moving into a building owned by Amazon on Monday.

The old downtown hotel is a plush space for a shelter, according to the nonprofit that will run it.

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