Amazon

Amazon plans to put offices next year in this former Travelodge in downtown Seattle. Until then, it will act as a shelter operated by Mary's Place.
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Homeless families in Seattle will start moving into a building owned by Amazon on Monday.

The old downtown hotel is a plush space for a shelter, according to the nonprofit that will run it.

'Week in Review' panel Joni Balter, Michael Maddux, Kim Malcolm and John Carlson.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Amazon is donating a building a temporary homeless shelter in Seattle. What role should the business community play in solving homelessness? Also, the troubled Western State Hospital has a new CEO. Will that help solve it's problems? And, should Washington ditch the sales tax in favor of an income tax?

Kim Malcolm chats over the news of the week with Seattle Channel's Joni Balter, KVI's John Carlson and Michael Maddux, chair of the King County Young Democrats.

Seattle Mayor Ed Murray in the KUOW studios.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Kim Malcolm talks to Seattle Mayor Ed Murray about Amazon's announcement that it will be turning one of its vacant South Lake Union buildings into a homeless shelter in partnership with Mary's Place. 

Amazon.com is under fire after an article from the New York Times lambasted its workplace atmosphere.
Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Gnl1gl

Kim Malcolm speaks with Seattle Times Reporter Ángel González about Amazon's announcement that it will establish a temporary shelter for homeless families near their South Lake Union headquarters.

The online retail giant will partner with local homeless service provider Mary's Place to temporarily re-purpose an existing real estate holding — an empty Travelodge — while the land it sits on waits to be developed. The shelter will house around 60-70 homeless families for one year.

Bill Radke speaks with Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer about a book reportedly written by Canadian serial killer Robert Pickton. The book was briefly available on Amazon and has now been removed from the site. 

AP Photo/John Zeedick

Bill Radke talks with Bloomberg News reporter Spencer Soper about Amazon's plans to move into the shipping business.

The Record: Wednesday, Jan. 20, Full Show

Jan 20, 2016
Inside the KUOW control room.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Amazon tried to hire homeless people in its warehouses. We'll show you why it didn't go so well. Also, what's it like to be a young transgender child in a family that listens to you? And advice on how to fight City Hall from someone who used to work at City Hall.

Listen to the full show above or check out the individual stories:

Jackie Williams had just gotten off her night shift at Swedish when I interviewed her outside the Salvation Army shelter on Capitol Hill. She would have a few short hours to sleep before the shelter closes for the day.
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Jackie Williams arrived in Seattle with nothing but a suitcase full of clothes. She had been hired as a certified nurse’s assistant.

When I was a child growing up in India, once every year my father took my two siblings, my mother and me to the village where he grew up. He thought it was important for us kids to see rural living and to learn how basic life could be. He often said, "City folks are lucky to have cooking gas cylinders. You'll see how food is cooked in the village."

Microsoft sign on the company's Redmond, Washington campus.
Flickr Photo/Wonderlane (CC-BY-NC-ND)/http://bit.ly/1NM853Z

David Hyde speaks with Geekwire co-founder Todd Bishop about the top three tech stories in Seattle in 2015, including a revival at Microsoft, Amazon deliveries, and the murky story of the $70,000 wage at Gravity Payments.

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Jon Talton about why commercial and residential construction, Amazon, and Boeing were the Seattle area's biggest economic drivers of 2015.

Amazon has released a glimpse of what its much-anticipated drone deliveries could look like, although it warns the service is still very much in a testing phase.

Tim Porter and Matt McIlwain of Madrona Venture Group, a heavy funder of Seattle's cloud startups
KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Seattle has become the center of a giant, invisible, global business, with Amazon and Microsoft as its core.

That business is the cloud, now estimated to be worth more than $15 billion to those two companies, which have become world leaders.

Amazon.com is under fire after an article from the New York Times lambasted its workplace atmosphere.
Flickr Photo/Robert Scoble (CC BY 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1Gnl1gl

Jeannie Yandel talks with Geekwire co-founder Todd Bishop about why Amazon responded to the New York Times' piece about its work culture two months after the fact, why the video messaging app Snapchat secretly opened a Seattle engineering office, and what the closure of the Urbanspoon office says about the Seattle tech landscape.  

Jeff Bezos, founder of Amazon.com.
Flickr Photo/Ali Asaria (CC BY NC 2.0)/http://bit.ly/1LQh3sI

David Hyde speaks with Ashley Stewart, reporter for the Puget Sound Business Journal, about Amazon founder and CEO Jeff Bezos' dip in the Harvard Business Review's ranking of top executives.

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