alcohol

Sharon Foster, with Gov. Gregoire, announcing the ban on alcoholic energy drinks in Washington in 2010.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Sharon Foster has many proud milestones from her term as chairwoman of Washington’s Liquor Control Board. She was appointed by Governor Gregoire in 2009 and has helped the state tackle medical marijuana, liquor privatization and legalized recreational marijuana.

“I never intended to ask for another term. I really do believe six years is plenty,” Foster told KUOW’s Marcie Sillman in an interview for The Record. “They'll get somebody younger with new ideas and I think that's great.”

The new Recovery School is moving into the former Queen Anne High School gymnasium building.
KUOW Photo/Ann Dornfeld / KUOW

When teenagers with substance abuse problems get out of rehab and return to school, studies show that it’s likely that their peers will offer them drugs within the very first hour. That makes staying clean — or staying in school — difficult. Teens with drug and alcohol problems have a sky-high drop-out rate.

Public health officials say what young people need after rehab is a fresh start at a school focused on their needs and peers with the same goal to stay sober.

Ross Reynolds talks with Dennis Donovan, director of University of Washington's Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute, about why it's so hard to determine what recovery strategies work best for overcoming addiction.

Flickr Photo/MDMA (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Howard Pellett, the facilitator of an Alcoholics Anonymous alternative called SMART Recovery. Pellett describes his own experience with alcoholism and SMART's approach to addiction recovery.

Marcie Sillman interviews author Adam Rogers about his new book, "Proof: The Science of Booze." In it, he explores topics like what makes an excellent glass of whiskey, when humans first started to consume fermented fruits, and how we've developed the process of creating a good cocktail over the centuries.

Flickr Photo/kern.justin (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks to Fircrest City Councilmember Hunter George about the efforts change the city's prohibition-era laws on alcohol sales and consumption.

Flickr Photo/MDMA (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher speaks with Susan Collins, a researcher in the University of Washington's Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Health, about a new intervention which combines an anti-craving drug with goal-setting talk therapy to reduce the negative consequences experienced by chronically homeless and alcohol-dependent adults, without necessarily requiring sobriety.

Oregon Latinos Face Bigger Problems With Alcohol

May 22, 2014

Compared to other Oregonians, a lot of Latinos in Oregon don't drink alcohol. Yet those who do drink face bigger problems. Some of the reasons are cultural.

For centuries, hard apple cider has been made with the fermented juice of apples — nothing more, nothing less. And a lot of cider drinkers and makers — let's call them purists — like it that way.

But a new wave of renegade cider makers in America is shirking tradition and adding unusual ingredients to the fermentation tank — from chocolate and tropical fruit juices to herbs, chili peppers and unusual yeasts. Their aim — which is controversial among the purists — is to bring out the best, or just the weirdest, flavors in the ciders.

Ke$ha says that to start the day she'll brush her teeth with a bottle of Jack Daniel's whiskey. Nicki Minaj likes to "have a drink, have a clink" of Bud Light. And the party-rockin' hip-hop duo LMFAO like Ciroc, and they love Patron. "Shots, shots, shots, shots everybody!"

All that name-checking of alcohol brands encourages teens to drink, researchers say. Adolescents who liked songs like these were three times as likely to drink, and were twice as likely to binge than their peers who didn't like those songs.

Since its founding in the 1930s, Alcoholics Anonymous has become part of the fabric of American society. AA and the many 12-step groups it inspired have become the country's go-to solution for addiction in all of its forms. These recovery programs are mandated by drug courts, prescribed by doctors and widely praised by reformed addicts.

It’s been nearly a year since a repeat drunk driver caused a horrific accident in north Seattle.

From its earliest days as America's homegrown whiskey elixir, Kentucky bourbon has been traveling on boats.

In fact, boats were a key reason why Kentucky became the king of bourbon. In the late 1700s, trade depended on waterways, and distillers in the state had a big advantage: the Ohio River. They'd load their barrels onto flatboats on the Ohio, which flowed into the Mississippi, taking their golden liquor as far down as New Orleans.

Flickr Photo/albedo20 (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with journalist Caitlin Flanagan about her Atlantic Magazine cover story, "The Dark Power of Fraternities."

Flanagan said the fraternity industry is the largest provider of alcohol to underage drinkers in the United States outside of family members.

Flickr Photo/Steve Snodgrass (CC-BY-NC-ND)

At $1.39, less than the price of a pack of gum, you can get up to four servings of alcohol at a store selling high alcohol beverages. Starting Saturday, though, that store will have to be located outside of downtown Olympia.

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