The state of Alaska has sent thousands of pink slips to its workers. The ripple effects could affect the fishing industry.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Marcie Sillman talks to Alexandra Gutierrez of Alaska Public Radio about the budget standstill in Alaska's Legislature and how a government shutdown will affect the lives of Alaskans. 

Marcie Sillman talks to Jake Beattie, executive director of the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend, about the Race to Alaska, in which contestants row, paddle or sail 750 miles to Ketchikan, Alaska. 

At 5 a.m. Thursday morning, a wide range of catamarans, sloops, kayaks and ocean rowboats will launch from Port Townsend, Washington, in the inaugural Race to Alaska.

Marcie Sillman talks to Alexandra Gutierrez of Alaska Public Radio about Alaska's Safe Children's Act, popularly known as Erin's Law.

Shell's oil rig Kulluk became stranded in Kodiak, Alaska two years ago. This photo of the stranded vessel  was taken  Jan. 7, 2013.
Flickr Photo/U.S. Pacific Command (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks to Alexandra Gutierrez, reporter for Alaska Public Radio, about the resolution scolding Washington for protesting the Shell Artic drilling rig's arrival to Washington waters amid serious budget talks.

Supreme Court SCOTUS
Flickr Photo/Kjetil-Ree (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks to Alexandra Gutierrez of the Alaska Public Radio Network about the decision by Alaska's attorney general to sign a letter with 15 other states advising the Supreme Court to uphold state bans on same-sex marriage. 

Flickr Photo/North Cascades National Park

Ross Reynolds talks to Alexandra Gutierrez of the Alaska Public Radio Network about the Alaska State Legislature's debates over new marijuana regulation laws.

The Obama administration is proposing new protections for large portions of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The U.S. Department of Interior says it's the first time it's recommended additional protections and that their new recommendations have the potential to be one of the largest conservation measures "since Congress passed the visionary Wilderness Act over 50 years ago."

Americans expect police to carry guns. In most places, it's just assumed that law enforcement is always armed. But not everywhere.

One of the last exceptions to the rule is the native communities of rural Alaska, such as Manokotak, a Yupik village of about 400 in southwest Alaska. Hunters and fishermen live there in modest houses huddled along a few roads.

On election night in a hotel ballroom in Anchorage, Alaska, Sen. Lisa Murkowski picked up a chair and waved it over her head.

"I am the chairmaaaaaaaaaaan!" she shouted.

Facebook Photo/Save Bristol Bay

Jeannie Yandel talks to Alexandra Gutierrez, state government reporter for Alaska Public Radio, about some of the measures that passed in Alaska after the 2014 mid-term election.

Everything in Alaska is a little bit bigger — even the produce. A 138-pound cabbage, 65-pound cantaloupe and 35-pound broccoli are just a few of the monsters that have sprung forth from Alaska's soil in recent years.

At the annual Alaska State Fair, which opens Thursday in Palmer, the public will have the chance to gawk at giants like these as they're weighed for competition.

U.S. Geological Survey Photographic Library

Fifty years ago, a large earthquake centered near Anchorage, Alaska, set off a fatal chain of destruction that reached through Washington and all the way down into California.

March 27, 1964 – Good Friday – was a typical early spring day in Seattle. But just after 7:30 p.m., an earthquake disrupted the peaceful evening all along the Pacific coast.

Tom Kizzia's book "Pilgrim's Wilderness."

Alaska journalist Tom Kizzia spent a decade following the Pilgrims, a modern-day Alaska pioneer family. With his wife and fifteen children, Papa Pilgrim masqueraded as a homespun Christian family man. Over time, however, Kizzia reveals that this father was actually a sociopath.

Kizzia spoke at the Elliott Bay Book Company on August 8.

Alaska Plane Crash "A Tragedy For All The Communities Involved"

Jul 9, 2013

Federal safety investigators are looking into the airplane crash in the fishing community of Soldotna, Alaska, that occurred on Sunday. All 10 people on board the de Havilland DHC3 Otter died, including the pilot and nine passengers.  The plane was a small air taxi, common in Alaska where the road system is limited. Ross Reynolds talks with Rusty Roessler, general manager of Pacific Alaska Shellfish and friend of the late pilot.