agriculture

If you go by their declarations and promises, meat producers are drastically cutting back on the use of antibiotics to treat their poultry, pigs and cattle. Over the past year, one big food company after another has announced plans to stop using these drugs.

But if you go by the government's data on drugs sold to livestock producers, it's a different story.

Andrew Ide grapples with flooding on his farm in Snohomish.
Courtesy of Micha Ide

Farmer Micha Ide had to canoe off her property for this interview – that’s how bad the flooding was.

Ide was at her neighbor’s house when she spoke with KUOW’s Bill Radke. Her goats and sheep were there too, and would be until waters from the Snohomish River recede.

Winemaker Charles Smith
Courtesy of Charles Smith Wines

Ross Reynolds interviews Charles Smith, one of Washington state’s winemaking stars. He managed rock bands in Denmark before moving to Walla Walla, Washington in 1999. Despite knowing little about making wine, he’s gone on to become successful, even being named Wine Enthusiast magazine's wine maker of the year last year. 

In America, our food options are remarkably unaffected by the changing seasons. We just keep eating salad greens and tomatoes without regard to the onset of winter.

In most of the country, there's little chance that the greens we eat in the late fall and winter are locally grown.

But if there were greenhouses nearby, they could be. And in a small but growing number of places, local greenhouses are there.

Take Lower Makefield Township, Pa., right across the Delaware River from Trenton, N.J.

Farmers challenging a Southern Oregon county’s voter-approved ban on genetically engineered crops have agreed to settle. If approved by the court, Oregon’s first countywide ban will have cleared a final legal hurdle.

It was juice that did the trick.

The juice from the fruit of the baobab tree was creamy and flavorful, with a hint of mystery. The tamarind juice was dark, fruity and tangy. And there was juice from the plumlike ziziphus.

The juices were served in Linguere, a region in Senegal that's been devastated by drought.

A fresh agricultural foe has orchardists bulldozing and burning cherry trees across Washington and Oregon.

Northwest farmers are watching several bills closely in Congress that would try to keep trade moving through ports in the event of a labor dispute.

We've heard a lot about the negative effects of climate change in the arctic and subarctic. But some Alaskans, like farmer Tim Meyers, are seeing warming temperatures as an opportunity.

Now that potato harvest is underway at his Bethel farm, Meyers uses a giant potato washer, like a washing machine for root vegetables, to clean California white potatoes.

They're some of the only commercially produced vegetables in this southwestern Alaska region, about the size of Oregon.

Meyers says the warming summers are a big part of his success.

For the next week temperatures in Washington’s farmland are predicted to be mild. But wine grape growers and orchardists still worry a cold snap could hurt them.

King County is trying to sell, at a discount, a large swath of land north of Fall City for a new dairy farm.
Flickr Photo/Jenny Ingram (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1Ob39rY

David Hyde talks with King County Executive Dow Constantine about efforts to preserve farmland and open space in rural King County.

'Apple beauty contest'
Flickr Photo/quilldancer (CC BY NC ND)/http://bit.ly/1kbQWWP

David Hyde spoke with Yakima Valley apple grower Ric Valicoff about increasingly hot and dry conditions in Central Washington and how that could affect the future of the fruit tree industry. 

Like all business owners, farmers want to get paid for their work. Sometimes, that work creates problems for the environment, so regulators are advancing the idea of creating environmental markets to allow farmers to make money off of their conservation practices.

Under plans in development, farmers could generate environmental credits by farming in ways that store carbon, filter out water pollution, or preserve wildlife habitat. Those credits could be bought, sold, and traded by companies that need to balance out their own emissions or pollution.

Pot farmers have to follow the same rules and regulations as the rest of the agriculture industry. That was a key takeaway Wednesday at a workshop for budding marijuana growers in Salem.

In some areas of the Northwest, dryland farmers are getting impatient. They need rain to plant winter wheat.

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