affirmative action

Stuart Taylor's book, "Mismatch."

Marcie Sillman talks with Stuart Taylor, Jr., a Brookings Institution nonresident senior fellow, about race and how it should or should not be used in college admissions or hiring practices.

Taylor is also the author of "Mismatch: How Affirmative Action Hurts Students It's Intended to Help, and Why Universities Won't Admit It."

Flickr Photo/SP8254 (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds talks with Marcia Coyle, the chief Washington correspondent for the National Law Journal, about the repercussions of the Supreme Court's decision on Michigan's affirmative action case Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action.

The Supreme Court has ruled that a Michigan ballot initiative to ban racial preferences in college admissions is constitutional, overturning a lower court decision.

In a 6-2 decision Tuesday, the justices said the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals was wrong to set aside the voter-approved ban as discriminatory.

Ross Reynolds talks with University of Washington historian Trevor Griffey about Seattle's role in protests that led to the early formation of affirmative action.

Episode 40: Young Seattleites Say Code Switching Is A Tough Habit To Break

Jun 27, 2013
KUOW Photo / Jenny Asarnow

There’s no such thing as a normal you. Do you talk to your boss the same way you talk to your dog? Probably not. This is called code switching.

Inspired by NPR’s Code Switch, hosts Kadian Vanloo and Antonia Dorn share stories about why and how youth code switch:

  • Tamil is the mother tongue for both Ananya Shankar and her cousin, RadioActive's Kamna Shastri. But when Ananya visits the United States for the first time, Kamna notices her cousin only speaks to her in English. 
  • RadioActive's Riley Guttman lives on Mercer Island where the African-American population is just over one percent. His black friend notices that when he walks in on a group of white friends, the conversation tends to change — and not how you might think.

Speaking of race, affirmative action was under scrutiny at the Supreme Court of the United States this week. It's been illegal in Washington state since 1998, but people still have opinions about it. RadioActive's Yafiet Bezabih asked Seattleites what they think.