aerospace

NTSB's Joseph Kolly, holds an fire-damaged battery casing from the Japan Airlines Boeing 787 Dreamliner that caught fire at Boston's Logan Airport, at the NTSB laboratory in Washington, D.C., Jan. 24, 2013.
AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta

A report from the National Transportation Safety Board says Boeing, its contractors and the Federal Aviation Administration share the blame for a fire in a 787's lithium-ion battery at Boston's Logan Airport two years ago. That fire was one of two incidents that led to the grounding of the Dreamliner fleet in 2013.

The NTSB said the fire on the tarmac at Boston Logan was the result of a short-circuit in a single battery cell. It resulted in smoke, which Boeing said would be a one in 10 million event. But then it spread to other cells, causing a wave of extreme heat known as a thermal runaway and fire.

Flickr Photo/Andrew W. Sieber

Ross Reynolds speaks with Dave Waggoner, who's  leaving as airport director at Paine Field in Everett after 22 years on the job.

Paine Field was a Depression-era project as part of the Works Progress administration. It was believed at the time that it would be a "super airport." Although Sea-Tac has turned into Western Washington's super airport, Paine Field actually generates more economic activity.  

Seattle-based Alaska Airlines plans to launch five more jets Friday to evacuate American vacationers from Los Cabos, Mexico.

NASA announced the winners of its hotly-contested contract to ferry astronauts to the International Space Station.

Boeing was the big winner.

The company's space unit will be paid more than four billion dollars to deliver and certify its Crew Space Transportation Capsule.

A little over half that will be paid to Boeing's competitor Space X for its own version, called the Dragon.

Mike Fincke is a former International Space Station crew member.

At a news conference Tuesday, Fincke said having two competing capsules will be good for crew safety.

Courtesy/Boeing Company

South Carolina has won the exclusive right to build the 787-10, the longest version yet of the Dreamliner. The decision means South Carolina will make as many Dreamliners as Washington state does by the end of the decade.

A refrigerated train carrying the remains of the people who died aboard the downed Malaysia Airlines plane arrived in Kharkiv, Ukraine, on Tuesday. That's a city controlled by the central government in Kiev and 17 hours away from the chaos of Hrabove, the eastern city controlled by pro-Russian separatists, where the debris and remains were scattered.

The New York Times sets the scene:

It won’t just be Boeing jetliners flying lumbering test patterns over Moses Lake, Washington. Japan-based Mitsubishi Aircraft announced Monday it has selected Grant County International Airport as its U.S. test flight center to test its new 70 to 90 passenger regional jet. The test flights could start in the fall of 2015.

Can two airlines be partners and rivals at the same time? Seattle-based Alaska Airlines and Delta Air Lines are long-term contractual allies. But now the relationship is being tested.

Flickr Photo/Chuck Taylor

Boeing is buying a software company that it says will make planes more fuel efficient.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

The Federal Aviation Administration failed to properly test the lithium ion batteries on the Boeing 787 Dreamliner, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a report released on Wednesday. The report said that the FAA relied too much on Boeing for technical expertise.

Aviation Consultant: WTO Trade Rules Are 'Toothless'

May 20, 2014
Flickr Photo/Andrew W. Sieber (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with Scott Hamilton, an aviation consultant from the Leeham company, about the European Union's potential challenge to Boeing's tax breaks and what that says about trade rules and international business.

KUOW Photo/Carolyn Adolph

Boeing says it will have to wait until sometime in 2016 to turn a profit on the 787 Dreamliners line.

By that time, the aerospace says developing the game-changing plane will cost the company more than $25 billion. There was a time when Boeing thought it would take $5 billion to develop the new plane.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Ross Reynolds talks with University of Puget Sound sociology professor Leon Grunberg about the larger implications for organized labor following Friday's vote to approve a contract extension between Boeing and local machinists.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

The Machinists have spoken, and the vote was 51 percent in favor of the contract extension.

After a nail-biter day of tense waiting, Machinist local Chief of Staff Jim Bearden announced the results to a small crowd of reporters gathered at the union’s Renton headquarters, as union members learned the same news next door.

KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Marcie Sillman checks in with KUOW reporter Joshua McNichols at the scene of the machinist vote and David Hyde talks with New York Times labor reporter Steven Greenhouse about the implications of this vote for labor and the future of Boeing.

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