activism | KUOW News and Information

activism

Courtesy of Dave Hardwick

Civic Saturday is the brainchild of Eric Liu and Jená Cane, co-founders of the Seattle-based non-profit Citizen University. They call it the civic analog to church.

Like church, it brings people together but to ponder our civic lives. And like church, the gathering includes songs, readings of “scripture” taken from great American texts, silent reflection and a “sermon” given by Liu.

activists
Wenmei Hill

KUOW's politics team recently asked listeners: Has Donald Trump's election inspired you to get politically active for the first time? Here's a selection of responses we received. 

Attendees of the Mar. 4 Spirit of America Rally in Olympia, a pro-Trump event organized by Tacoma Narrows Tea Party coordinator Peggy Hutt (center) of Gig Harbor.
Photo courtesy Peggy Hutt

Donald Trump’s election galvanized a wave of activism on the left, including the women’s march that some political scientists say was the largest in American history.

Campaigners on the right say they’ve been energized by the election as well, even here in deep-blue Puget Sound.


People at a women's march on Seattle's Capitol Hill on Dec. 3.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

A new Republican president takes office. Half the nation is appalled.

But we're not talking about Donald Trump.


A husband and wife from Port Townsend, Washington, are on their way home after being expelled from Guatemala. The Washingtonians and several other international activists narrowly avoided arrest during a maritime abortion rights protest.

Amy Radil

Being a Daffodil Princess in Pierce County is not about winning a pageant. Kelty Pierce, 19, is emphatic on that point.

Photo courtesy of Writers Resist

Authors around the country led a series of events recently called “Writers Resist: A Celebration of Free Speech.” Participants read from their own work or historic writings concerned with freedom, free speech and equality. There were nine such events in Washington State. In Seattle, the participants in order of appearance were:

KUOW Photo/Lisa Wang

Ten days after President Donald Trump’s inauguration a group of Seattle-area artists and arts supporters came together to share experiences and build community. KUOW set aside a space for them to record personal messages. Their reflections express the conflict of the moment, marked by fear and hope, uncertainty and renewed determination.

B
Ashley Cleek

New York is called the "City of Immigrants" for good reason, as more than 3 million of its residents were born outside the US. So when President Donald Trump signed an executive order banning travel and immigration to the US by people from seven Muslim-majority nations, numerous protests erupted at airports and other places around the city.

Cab drivers briefly stopped picking up passengers at John F. Kennedy International Airport. And on Thursday, Yemeni bodega owners, declared a strike, too. They closed for eight hours, from noon to 8 p.m., to express their dismay. 

Leslie Brown, an activist with Edmonds Neighborhood Action Coalition, shouted into a bullhorn to rally dozens of protesters gathered outside the Edmonds PCC, January 29, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Before crowds packed a protest in Seattle, another protest was already underway.

Dozens of residents crowded onto the four corners of Edmonds Way and 100th Ave W, a busy intersection where locals go for groceries and commuters zoom past to catch the ferry.

They chanted, "No hate! No fear! Refugees are welcome here!" and cheered as cars blared their horns.

Here's what a few attendees told us:

Violet and Norward Brooks in front of a house they struggled to buy due to discrimination.
KUOW Photo/Caroline Chamberlain

The results of the recent presidential election has revealed stark divisions in this country.

This is especially clear in Seattle, where we’re notorious for being one of the most progressive cities in the country.


Donna Dean-Wright holds a sign at the Seattle women's march on Saturday, January 21, 2017.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

Editor's note: Some protest signs may be a little too, er, brazen for some.

“There will be hell toupée.”

“Hell yes, we’re ovary-reacting.”

“Golden rule not golden showers.”


KUOW Photo/John Ryan

Environmental groups say the incoming Trump administration could quickly wipe out years of work to protect America's land, air and water. But for many green groups, there's been a silver lining: Money and volunteers have poured in since the November election.


Kim Malcolm talks with Cuc Vu about why the city of Seattle is hosting an event on Inauguration Day to provide free legal advice to immigrants and refugees. Vu directs Seattle's Office of Immigrant and Refugee Affairs.

Cindy McIntire kisses her 1-month-old granddaughter Sophie Lin. She wrote Sophie Lin a letter, telling her that in the 1960s and 70s, they wondered if they should bring kids into the world. And yet out of that era came good, she says.
KUOW Photo/Isolde Raftery

On the eve of the Trump administration, we asked you to write your loved ones. These are those letters.


Today President Trump called recent anti-Semitic incidents “horrible” and “painful”
Photo via Flickr creative commons Gage Skidmore (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th president of the United States on Friday. The event will be marked across the country by both celebrations and protests. 

Here are some of the events taking place in Seattle and the surrounding area this week. It is not an exhaustive list.

As a new president takes office Friday, the City of Seattle will mark the occasion with a huge event for immigrants and refugees. It’s a symbolic contrast to events in Washington, D.C. And it also aims to help about a thousand immigrants with citizenship applications and other legal services.

KUOW Photo/Liz Jones

Since Donald Trump’s election, a sanctuary movement has popped up at college campuses across the United States. 

After devoting decades of her life to a cause — demonstrating for peace and against nuclear proliferation — Concepcion Picciotto has died. Persisting through cold and rough weather, she was a fixture outside the White House, where she was often called the president's closest neighbor.

Her protest vigil is considered the longest in U.S. history.

Rapper Draze performs at Garfield High School's Martin Luther King Day rally
KUOW Photo/Joshua McNichols

Seattle may have race and social justice as part of its mission, but the work isn't finished, say local leaders. They came together with citizens Monday in honor of Martin Luther King Jr. to talk about what still needs to be done.

Activists deliver a petition asking the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to divest from fossil fuels.
KUOW Photo/John Ryan

While the world's richest man was meeting with world leaders in Paris at the global climate summit, climate activists marched on his foundation's Seattle headquarters Monday.

José Luis Avila, of Renton, is fighting for the release of his wife Nestora Salgado from Mexico.
KUOW photo/Liz Jones

Human rights activist Nestora Salgado raised her family in Renton. She’s a U.S. citizen and a human rights activist.

But most people know her now as a political prisoner. She’s been held in a Mexican prison for more than two years, with limited outside contact.

'Seattle Is A Creepy, Salty Town With Dirt Under Her Nails'

Jul 14, 2015
The cover of the Seattle DIY zine from the Zine Archive and Publishing Project collection. The collection of 30,000 or so zines is currently in cold storage at a Seattle Public Library warehouse.
Courtesy of ZAPP

Seattle has one of the largest collections of zines -- tiny underground art manifestos that have usually been photocopied. ZAPP, the Zine Archive and Publishing Project, has been collecting them since 1996 and has amassed more than 30,000.

This essay comes from the 2002 edition of "The Puget Front." (Warning: Explicit language.)

Seattle is a creepy, salty town with dirt under her nails.

Flickr Photo/Laia Ros (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Slate writer Katy Waldman about the new trend in activism called clicktivism.

Seattle 2013: A Year In Protest

Dec 30, 2013
Heather Villanueva

As we looked back on the last year, debating which stories to highlight here, we noticed a trend that surprised us: 2013 was a year of activism and protest in the Seattle area.

Divestment: How Local Students Fought Apartheid

Dec 6, 2013
From African Activists Archive Project's Facebook page.

David Hyde speaks with Philip Goldman, former student activist and leader of Students Against Apartheid at the University of Washington, about the legacy of the late Nelson Mandela and the impacts of the divestment movement in the 1980s.

The Students Against Apartheid were instrumental in convincing the University to divest assets of companies that did business with South Africa.

Joi Ito / Flickr

Ross Reynolds interviewed Boing Boing blogger, journalist, science fiction author, and digital rights activist Cory Doctorow. Below are highlights from his interview on The Conversation

Elaine Brown. Image courtesy of Pat Thomas.
(Image courtesy of Pat Thomas)

Local record producer and writer Pat Thomas recently compiled a collection of music written by and for the Black Power movement,  "Listen, Whitey! The Sounds of Black Power 1965–1975." One of the musicians he discovered in putting the album together is a woman named Elaine Brown. She was the head of the Black Panther party during the mid '70s. Today, she's most well known for her activism for prisoners, but Pat thinks her music from the late '60s and early '70s has a message that still applies today.  He recommends listening to "Seize The Time," "The End of Silence" and "Until We're Free."

Seattle native and MC Macklemore and producer Ryan Lewis sit down with Ross Reynolds to discuss their careers, upcoming album and involvement with Washington’s pro same-sex marriage campaign. 

Pages