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Participants discussed Muslim cultures at KUOW studios at 'Ask A Muslim', Feb. 22, 2016.
Naomi Ishisaka

One reason we’re seeing such polarization in American society is that we’re not talking to each other. We’re wrapped up in our own cocoons and echo chambers.

In an effort to combat this, KUOW is launching a series of person-to-person conversation events we call 'Ask A __.'

PHOTOS: Austinites Take In The Solar Eclipse

28 minutes ago

A lot of Austinites were out taking in the eclipse this afternoon. And whether you were one of them or not, it was just a warmup for a couple more eclipses not too many years from now. 

A 25-year-old man was taken into custody Monday for allegedly trying to destroy a monument to Confederate Gen. Dick Dowling at a park in Houston, the office of Acting U.S. Attorney Abe Martinez said.

Dave Weinlick and Bethy Runze married at the mall 19 years go in a made-for-TV wedding, after meeting that same day. Now, terminal cancer threatens their future. On Friday, they returned to the mall to renew their bond.

Copyright 2017 MPR News. To see more, visit MPR News.

From Texas Standard:

Texas is at the epicenter of an aging boom. Texans are getting older, but older folks from other parts of the country are also moving here. With age comes failing health, and an increased need for assistance with performing daily living tasks at home. Many people with physical disabilities also need this kind of assistance. And the people who provide attendant care in Texas are among the lowest-paid in the nationOnly Mississippi pays less. Did we mention Texas also has some of the most expensive cities to live in?

 

From Texas Standard:

In the first months of his administration, President Donald Trump has made good on a campaign promise: to tighten immigration restrictions and crack down on immigrants living in the United States illegally. Agencies like Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, have rounded up immigrants in raids across the country, creating a boom for private prisons — an industry that's a growing part of the Texas economy.

From Texas Standard:

In the wake of the violence in Charlottesville, Va., Confederate monuments are coming down in public places across the country. Overnight, the University of Texas at Austin quietly dismantled four statues from the campus’ South Mall. But they're not going down everywhere.

Tom Weber of MPR News spoke to Steve Sack, Pulitzer Prize-winning editorial cartoonist for Star Tribune. 

Copyright 2017 MPR News. To see more, visit MPR News.

Linguistic theories give us the idea that language determines how and what we think. However, looking at the psychology behind how we use language could point in another direction.

In this edition of Two Guys on Your Head, Dr. Art Markman and Dr. Bob Duke talk about how nouns can teach us a lot about how our brains create and influence language use.


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Copyright 2017 KUT 90.5. To see more, visit KUT 90.5.

After corporate sponsors backed out and funding dried up, the Capital City Black Film Festival was canceled this year. But organizers decided that wasn't going to be the end.   

It’s estimated that 1 million plastic bottles are bought around the world every minute. A few years ago, National Parks decided to try and make a small dent in that number by banning water bottle sales on parkland. Now, the Trump administration has reversed that policy.

Students can earn an associate's degree during their four years in high school through a new program starting this year at two Austin schools.

University of Texas at Austin has removed four statues on campus overnight, three of which memorialize Confederate figures, on the orders of university President Greg Fenves.

Where The Wildfires Are In The Pacific Northwest

Aug 20, 2017

UPDATE (Aug. 20, 2017, 11:14 a.m. P.T.) After a rainy, cool winter and spring, this year's fire season kicked off June 7 in southern Oregon.

UPDATE 8:17 a.m., Aug. 21: The Texas A&M Fire Service reports the fire is now 95 percent contained.

UPDATE 6:10 p.m.: The fire is now 90 percent contained, Texas A&M Fire Service reports. 

Hundreds gathered outside Austin City Hall on Saturday to rally against white supremacy and hear from activists and elected leaders. Demonstrators wrapped around the exterior of City Hall and helped themselves to free water bottles from coolers to combat the triple-digit heat.

Why did ISIS target Spain? The answer may lie in history.

Aug 18, 2017
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Sergio Perez

On Thursday, a van ran over pedestrians on Barcelona’s Las Ramblas strip. It took a very short time for ISIS to claim responsibility for the attack.

At least 13 people died and around 100 people were injured.

But why did ISIS target Spain, now, for practically the first time? 

Related: See all the terrorist attacks around the world from 2016

There could be many answers to this question.

The aftermath of the deadly attacks in Barcelona

Aug 18, 2017

Thousands of people marched to the Plaça de Catalunya in Barcelona Friday, chanting “I'm not afraid” in Catalan. It was a show of solidarity after a series of terrorist attacks claimed by ISIS rocked Spain. About 14 people were killed and several more were injured in the tourist-heavy Las Ramblas area of Barcelona when a van plowed into pedestrians. Liz Castro, a writer and longtime resident of Barcelona, witnessed the march on Friday.

If Gov. Greg Abbott calls a second special legislative session this summer, it won’t be for redistricting.

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton revealed Friday that Abbott won't ask lawmakers to redraw the state's congressional map — found by a federal court this week to discriminate against Latino and black voters — in a fresh round of legislative overtime. 

Here's a question many of us have been debating since the deadly protests in Charlottesville last weekend: What should be done with a monument dedicated to a Confederate figure? Should it be taken down? Or should it be recontextualized? 

It's a question similar to one Paraguayans had to answer not long ago. The debate in that South American country revolved around a statue of longtime dictator General Alfredo Stroessner.

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Joshua Roberts/Reuters 

Peter didn’t want to use his real name because he’s afraid of becoming a target for white nationalists.

He was one of the counter-protesters in Charlottesville on Saturday — the ones President Donald Trump on Tuesday referred to as “very violent” and “charging with clubs in their hands, swinging clubs.”

I first reached out to Peter in July, over Skype, when I was doing research on a movement called antifa, short for anti-fascist.

From Texas Standard:

Despite the struggle President Donald Trump has had moving his agenda through Congress, his presidency is still likely to leave a major mark on U.S. law.

Beloved Yemeni activist abducted by government security

Aug 18, 2017

You've seen and heard Hisham al-Omeisy. The friendly Yemeni observer who has told news services around the world about conditions in his war-ravaged country was abducted by three carloads of armed men in Sanaa on Monday afternoon. He is being held at the government's National Security Bureau in the Yemeni capital. 

His family cautioned reporters, many of whom count Omeisy as a friend as well as a source, to remain silent while negotiations were conducted through back channels. The family lifted its embargo today.

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Brenna Daldorph

On Saturday, Aug. 12, four days after Kenya’s elections, Octopizzo had some tea with his cousin Oloo in Nairobi. Octopizzo is a well-known hip-hop artist in Kenya. When the cousins were done, Octo walked Oloo to a taxi stage where he could get a boda boda — a motorcycle taxi — back home to Kibera, the slum where they both grew up.

Octopizzo went home and flicked on the news.

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Andrea Crossan/PRI

We just finished our POSITIVE series — stories of women and girls under the age of 24 living with HIV in South Africa. We called our Series POSITIVE not only because it centers on the stories of HIV-positive women and girls, but also because it was important to us to highlight stories of people who do not see such a diagnosis as an ending.

Back in the mid-2000s, when producer Roy Lee was pitching an American remake of the Japanese horror film “Ju-On: The Grudge,” the original movie didn’t even have English subtitles. In order to shop it around, he and his team inserted their own subtitles based on what they thought was happening in the movie.

“I remember there was a meeting with the original director [Takashi Shimizu] where people were asking him about the storyline, and he had no idea what they were talking about, because we had gotten some of the details wrong,” says Lee.

An industrial-sized fridge hums in the background as Hannah Frankel, 28, gives a tour of her housing cooperative, pointing out the shared kitchen, pantry and meeting rooms.

“We consistently have a waitlist,” she says. “We consistently have a great demand.”

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Jonathan Ernst/Reuters 

America's standing in the world is dwindling fast under the Trump administration. The White House appears in chaos, and the failure to confront neo-Nazis has alarmed Europe. Europeans are giving up on a US that can't get anything done and refuses to provide leadership on the world stage.

These are the impressions gleaned by the BBC's Katty Kay after four weeks in Europe. Kay is an anchor of BBC World News America in Washington.


From PRI's The World ©2017 PRI

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Sumaya Hisham/Reuters

On March 10, 2015, a student threw excrement at the statute of Cecil Rhodes at the University of Cape Town in South Africa.

It was a symbolic gesture of protest against the British imperialist and avowed white supremacist who some call the “architect of apartheid.”

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