wikileaks

Update at 10:18 a.m. ET. 35 Years:

Army Pfc. Bradley Manning, who was responsible for the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history, was sentenced by a military judge to 35 years in prison Wednesday, according to reporters covering the trial at Fort Meade, Md. He'll get about 3 1/2 years' credit for time he's already spent behind bars.

More details (added at 10:30 a.m. ET):

-- Manning is also to be dishonorably discharged.

This post was last updated at 6:42 p.m. ET.

Bradley Manning, the former intelligence analyst who perpetrated the largest leak of classified information in U.S. history, has been acquitted of the most serious charge against him.

Col. Denise Lind, the military judge presiding over the case in Fort Meade, Md., found the Army private not guilty of aiding the enemy, when he released hundreds of thousands of classified documents to WikiLeaks. The charge carried a possible punishment of life in prison.

Jerry Siegel and Joe Schuster, Look Magazine, February 27,1940

There's a new Superman movie coming out this month. Why does the story of the man of steel continue to resonate with people? Perhaps he represents a myth we like to tell ourselves: that given absolute power, we would choose to use it for good.

That's right, keep telling yourself that.

Full list of stories from KUOW Presents, June 4:

We Steal Secrets: A New Documentary About Wikileaks

May 30, 2013

There is a new documentary out about Wikileaks, Julian Assange and the American soldier Bradley Manning. It's called We Steal Secrets. Ross Reynolds interviews filmmaker Alex Gibney.

As information becomes more accessible and more easily distributed, are secrets becoming a thing of the past? Ross Reynolds talks with Andy Greenberg about his new book, “This Machine Kills Secrets: How Wikileaks, Cypherpunks, and Hactivists Aim to Free the World’s Information.”