criminal law

DUI Law Compliance
10:50 am
Thu May 2, 2013

DUI Monitoring And Enforcement: An Imperfect System

Drivers convicted of an alcohol related DUI are required to install a breathalyzer device in their vehicle. Since January they're also required to install cameras so that the test taker can be verified.
Credit KUOW Photo/Patricia Murphy

Washington state lawmakers are poised to impose tougher laws against drivers caught driving drunk. They were moved to action following two fatal crashes involving drivers with previous DUIs.

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Supreme Court Opinion
7:03 am
Fri April 12, 2013

Corporations Are People Too In Identity Theft Law

The Temple of Justice in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/Aidan Wakely-Mulroney

The Supreme Court of Washington ruled Thursday that a corporation can be a victim of identity theft just like a person can under state law. The law makes it a felony to steal the identity of a “person, living or dead.”

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Shepard-Byrd Act
7:15 am
Wed April 3, 2013

Federal Prosecution Adds Stiff Penalty To Hate Crime Charge

Sukhvir Singh, a Seattle cab driver, was attacked by a passenger in a vicious hate crime in November 2007.
PRNewsFoto/Sikh Coalition

It’s a story you may have heard before: A drunk guy gets in a cab. His driver has dark skin, a beard and a turban. The passenger calls the driver racial names and beats him so viciously, the driver lands in the hospital and the passenger goes to jail.

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Federal Law Enforcement
7:12 pm
Wed March 27, 2013

Suspected Immigration Violators Face Long Waits in King County Jails

Some inmates have longer stays at the King County Adult Detention Center in downtown Seattle due to an agreement between the King County Sheriff and US Immigration and Customs Enforcement.
King County Photo

If you’re booked into a King County jail, you’ll stay an extra month on average if immigration officials want to review your file. That’s even if you haven’t been charged with a crime.

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Perugia Murder Retrial
1:52 pm
Tue March 26, 2013

Knox Or Not: Plenty Of Cases Are Tried Without A Defendant

Amanda Knox is led away from an appeals court in Perugia, Italy, in November 2010. Her murder conviction in the death of a flatmate was ultimately overturned, but now, Italy's highest court has ruled she must be retried.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Tue March 26, 2013 2:04 pm

Amanda Knox may never again set foot in Italy. But that doesn't mean she won't face another trial there.

Courts around the world — particularly in Italy — have shown themselves willing to try people in absentia.

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The Short Arm Of The Law
4:13 pm
Fri March 22, 2013

High Court To Seattle Police: “You Had To Be There” For Misdemeanor Arrest

The Temple of Justice in Olympia.
Flickr Photo/Aidan Wakely-Mulroney

If you’re not a police officer, imagine you are one.

Picture yourself perched on the second floor of a building in Belltown. You see someone selling drugs. You radio a fellow officer on the ground and tell him to arrest a guy on a misdemeanor charge of drug loitering. Your partner searches him and finds crack.

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High Court Review
12:00 pm
Mon March 4, 2013

Death Penalty Cases Derailed In King County

An officer leads Joseph McEnroe into the courtroom before he pleaded not guilty to six murder charges at the King County Courthouse in Seattle on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2008.
AP Photo/Kevin P. Casey

Both of King County’s death penalty cases are on hold pending appeal to the Washington Supreme Court. A key issue in both cases is whether the defendants have experienced any hardships that should have required prosecutors to be more lenient.

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Law
1:34 pm
Mon November 26, 2012

Northwest Tribes Begin To Try Reservation Crime Cases Under Tougher Laws

Originally published on Mon November 26, 2012 5:27 pm

A tribal court on the Umatilla Indian Reservation is one of the first to hand-down a long prison term under new tougher criminal sentencing laws enacted by Congress in 2010.

It used to be that tribes could only sentence a Native American criminal to up to one year of jail time -- no matter the crime. Typically the U.S. Justice Department was called in for everything else -– but many cases were dropped.

Now, tribal courts have the power to sentence native criminals who commit crimes on a reservation up to three years per count, for up to nine years.

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