arena

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

DALLAS (AP) -- NBA owners voted Wednesday to reject the Sacramento Kings' proposed move to Seattle, the latest in a long line of cities that have tried to land the franchise.

KUOW Photo/Deborah Wang

    

Correction: audio for this story differs from its original broadcast, which incorrectly identified Nate McMillan as a member of the Sonics championship team from 1979. We have also clarified the story to indicate that the two conference trophies in MOHAI's warehouse are not the only two won by the Sonics.

When the owners of the Seattle Sonics moved the team to Oklahoma City in 2008, basketball fans in Seattle were crushed. But they got one consolation prize: The team’s owners agreed to leave behind the Sonics’ cache of memorabilia.

A King County Superior Court judge has rejected a lawsuit that would have stalled plans to build a new professional basketball and hockey arena in Seattle’s Sodo neighborhood. It's part of a proposal to bring an NBA team back to Seattle.

Ask King County Executive Dow Constantine

Oct 18, 2012
Dow Constantine
KUOW Photo/Jason Pagano

Seattle's arena deal took a major step forward this week as King County Executive Dow Constantine and Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn signed legislation to commit $200 million in public money toward a new $490 million sports facility. That frees investor Chris Hansen to begin the hunt for an NBA franchise – just as a union representing Seattle longshore and warehouse workers says it will file a lawsuit to halt the deal. We'll ask Dow Constantine what's next for the arena and delve into his proposed county budget. Have a question for the King County Executive?

Seattle Storm playing Washington Mystics
Flickr/Ronald Woan

The King County Council and Seattle City Council have approved the new arena deal to bring NBA and NHL teams to Seattle.

But what about the Seattle Storm?

Will they move to Chris Hansen’s new arena in Sodo, or will they continue to call Key Arena home? Ross talks to Seattle Storm president and CEO Karen Bryant.

Sodo stadiums
(Flickr photo/SDOT)

The King County Council and Seattle City Council both gave the go-ahead for an agreement to build a new professional basketball and hockey arena in Seattle.

The union that represents Longshore workers plans to file a lawsuit to stop it.

Basketball signed by the 2007 Sonics.
Justin Kraemer Photography

Story last updated by Patricia Murphy on October 15, 2012 at 3:13 p.m.

The Sodo arena plan has had a few twists and turns.  After first being unveiled in February, it was later altered by the Seattle City Council and more recently by the King County Council.

The latest iteration is scheduled to be voted on by the whole King County and Seattle City councils.

Here’s an outline of how it works:

Sodo stadiums
(Flickr photo/SDOT)

The full King County Council is expected to vote on the latest Sodo arena plan next week, following some adjustments made by the council’s budget committee Tuesday.

Committee chairman Joe McDermott said the adjustments included that language that requires
improving pedestrian access to the new Sodo arena. “It could be anywhere from sidewalks to an overpass or underpass somewhere.  I want to underscore that those kinds of pedestrian improvement also assist in freight mobility,” he said.