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The World

Monday - Friday, 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. on KUOW2

The World brings you award-winning coverage of breaking news, in-depth features, hard-hitting commentaries, and thought-provoking interviews found nowhere else in US news coverage.

Schiller Sanon-Jules remembers eating fried pork and plantains in Little Haiti when he was a kid in the 1980s.

“It was a taste of Haiti,” says Sanon-Jules, who immigrated to the US as a child and now owns the Little Haiti Thrift and Gift Store, one of the shops on the neighborhood’s brightly-colored main street.

As a teenager, he used to parade down the same street with friends and drums, in a kind of Haitian second line.    

We live in confusing times in America and around the world. But President Donald Trump’s new national security strategy (NSS) could leave US allies and adversaries more confused than ever.

While the strategy document itself champions diplomacy, international institutions and even includes a nod toward nation-building, the president has been consistent in his criticism of all three. As a result, Trump’s rollout on Monday made his administration look more chaotic and inconsistent than ever.

The Federal Communications Commission voted last week to dismantle so-called net neutrality rules set under the Obama-era Open Internet Order. The 2015 order prevented Internet Service Providers  like Comcast and Verizon from blocking certain websites or charging more for certain content.

What does that mean for consumers?

When you think of mariachi, you’ll likely picture a band of men in embroidered suits and sombreros, playing guitar, violin and trumpet for diners in a Mexican restaurant.

For Omar Naré, that was exactly the problem. Mariachi was veering off into the realm of a stereotype, or worse yet, a relic. Mariachi had stalled, and it needed new life.

Iceland's new prime minister is a feminist and environmentalist who is among the youngest leaders in the world. She has a degree in literature with a special interest in Icelandic crime novels. She appeared in a music video 20 years ago with an Icelandic band, Bang Gang. And she's considered Iceland's most trusted politician by numerous polls.

Iceland's new prime minister is a feminist and environmentalist who is among the youngest leaders in the world. She has a degree in literature with a special interest in Icelandic crime novels. She appeared in a music video 20 years ago with an Icelandic band, Bang Gang. And she's considered Iceland's most trusted politician by numerous polls.

Iceland's new prime minister is a feminist and environmentalist who is among the youngest leaders in the world. She has a degree in literature with a special interest in Icelandic crime novels. She appeared in a music video 20 years ago with an Icelandic band, Bang Gang. And she's considered Iceland's most trusted politician by numerous polls.

Iceland's new prime minister is a feminist and environmentalist who is among the youngest leaders in the world. She has a degree in literature with a special interest in Icelandic crime novels. She appeared in a music video 20 years ago with an Icelandic band, Bang Gang. And she's considered Iceland's most trusted politician by numerous polls.

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Phillip Martin/WGBH News

Henry Lemus Calderón was, by his own admission, not perfect.

He attended services at Faro de Luz church in Nantucket where the Rev. Rigoberto Lemus presides. Lemus — a common Salvadoran name on Nantucket and no relation to Henry — said Calderón spent a lot of time behind church doors.

“We'd have a service Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday, and he always came those days. He always [volunteered] to open the door, receive the brothers and sisters. And he’s a good person,” said Lemus.

Russia thanks CIA for tip that thwarted terror attack

Dec 18, 2017
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Courtesy of Creative Commons, user Ludvig14

President Donald Trump boasted Monday that a tip from the CIA had saved “thousands” of lives in Russia.

President Trump appeared to be referring to an alleged plot to attack targets in Russia’s St. Petersburg — including the Cathedral of Our Lady of Kazan, a popular tourist attraction.

KOKOKO! makes experimental afropop with found objects

Dec 18, 2017

A-side B-side is a recurring segment on The World that compares the sounds and ideas of two songs, albums or artists. On the A-side: a folk or traditional selection; on the B-side: a contemporary selection.

There’s a repetitive ringing, smacking, clunking and zinging when you use a typewriter. It turns a a writer’s thought process into a percussive rhythm. That familiar, vintage sound has been repurposed now — by the Congolese musical collective, KOKOKO!

Christmas in Britain is fairly similar to other European and North American countries: Santa Claus, Christmas trees, turkeys and awkward family gatherings. But there is one unique element: the national obsession with something called a mince pie.

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Feisal Omar/Reuters

Ninety-two Somali immigrants, set to be deported from the US, found themselves shackled at the hands and feet and kept aboard a plane for two days earlier this month. That part of the story is not in dispute.

The Somalis left Louisiana on Dec. 7. Their flight, chartered by US Immigration and Customs Enforcement, was bound for Mogadishu, the capital of Somalia. But the plane never arrived.

After landing in Dakar, Senegal, on Africa's west coast, the one-way flight became a round trip, back to the US. Why that happened, though, remains subject to dispute. 

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Gene Blevins/Reuters

It’s been more than 250 days since it last rained in southern California.

Approximately 8,000 firefighters continue to battle massive wildfires, like the record-setting Thomas Fire.

Related: Firefighters race to get control of California wildfires

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Reuters/AAP/Lukas Coch 

“A national tragedy.”

That’s how the Australian prime minister characterized the findings, released Friday, of a five-year investigation into child sexual abuse.

Malcolm Turnbull on Friday extended his gratitude to thousands of survivors who were brave enough to tell their stories. “It’s been very tough, often harrowing work,"  he said, "but above all I want to thank and honor the courage of the survivors and their families who’ve told, often for the first time, the dreadful stories of abuse that they received from people who actually owed them love and protection."

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Regis Duvignau/Reuters

On Across Women's Lives' recent reporting trip to Bangladesh, we interviewed several women about work conditions in the garment factories.

MC Afrikan Boy's 'Wot It Do?' is a call to action

Dec 15, 2017
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Derrick Kakembo 

MC Afrikan Boy, Olushola Ajose, returns with his latest track, "Wot it Do?" It’s a danceable, club-ready track that aims to bring people to the dance floor.

The Southeast London Afrogrime musician bursts with energy, pairing neatly woven references to childhood nursery rhymes with a range of influences within grime, early afrobeat and Nigerian juju.

It was just before three o’clock on the afternoon of Oct. 16 when Malta’s most famous, outspoken blogger got into her car for what was to be the last time.

Minutes later, a bomb planted under the driver’s seat flung the vehicle into a field beside the road. Daphne Caruana Galizia, who’d relentlessly attacked corruption in the tiny island nation, was dead.

When Aaron Anaya arrived in Puerto Rico in November to help restore the San Juan electric grid, he realized he’d have to start with the maps. Anaya, an electrical engineer with Con Edison in New York, spends most of his 16-hour days translating work requests from Puerto Rico’s power authority, PREPA, into assignments for crews from New York. But PREPA's maps didn’t have the detail the workers needed.

“You have to be able to relate what’s on the map with what’s in the field, and it’s very different,” Anaya said. “It looks nothing like flat little lines. Things are everywhere.”

My family's ties to the global garment industry

Dec 15, 2017
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Al Ravenna/World Telegram &amp; Sun/<a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Garment_District_NYWTS.jpg#/media/File:Garment_District_NYWTS.jpg">CC BY 2.0 (image cropped)</a>

My lineage is wrapped up in the garment industry. My grandfather on my dad’s side was in the garment business. My aunties on my mom’s side were also in the industry.

My dad was a doctor, and when I was 6, my family moved from the center of the garment industry, New York City, to North Carolina, America's garment manufacturing state. The first time I got an inkling as to what the clothing industry was all about was when my little sister Claudia took a sewing class at the Singer store at the mall in Raleigh. I joined her on an outing to buy material at a fabric outlet store.

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Sergei Karpukhin/Reuters

Vladimir Putin always has a lot to say at his end-of-year press conferences.

And Thursday in Moscow, the Russian president returned to the podium once again for a nearly four-hour session with reporters.

Although the annual event is — for the most part — predictable and heavily scripted, dissonant voices somehow manage to pipe up. 

Russia’s influence in the Middle East is growing

Dec 14, 2017
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Alexander Zemlianichenko/Pool/Reuters

Vladimir Putin conducted a whirlwind tour of the greater Middle East region this week. For some observers, it was a showcase for Russia’s growing influence in the region. According to Ishaan Tharoor, “he exhibited the kind of clever strategic policymaking that the US is simply not doing in the region.”

Tharoor is a foreign affairs writer with the Washington Post and recently wrote “Putin is outplaying Trump in the Middle East.” 

The statue stands at the back of St. Mary’s Square in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Three girls, cast in bronze — one Chinese, one Korean and one Filipino — stand on a pedestal holding hands. In front of them, the bronze figure of Kim Hak-sun looks on. She was the first "comfort woman" to speak out in 1991 about her experiences.

The sculpture honors the estimated 200,000 women and girls from China, Korea, the Philippines and other countries who were forced to work as sex slaves by occupying Japanese troops during World War II. 

George Lampman is a veteran of the Korean War, but he didn't get through it alone.

George first arrived in Seoul as a 21-year-old Marine, part of a security detachment at the US Embassy. It was 1949.

He vividly remembers meeting Lee Sook Ei, a switchboard operator at the embassy.

“She was a beautiful girl [and] very, very intelligent,” George says.

He tried to ask Sook Ei out more than once, but he struck out.  

Here's a fantasy: A world where you never had to wait in line at the Department of Motor Vehicles. Save for the driving test, you could do almost everything online — from changing your address to renewing your license.

Other things in life — like voting and going to the doctor — would work just as efficiently. Any doctor you'd visit would already have access to your digitally stored medical records, and you’d never have to fill out one of those medical history forms in the waiting room.

Months after Puerto Rico was hit by back-to-back hurricanes, the island’s artistic community faces considerable challenges in its path toward recovery. Hurricane María — the second and more devastating storm — dealt a crippling blow to an already weakened power grid, resulting in a protracted blackout.

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Jonathan Bachman

Climate change fueled some of the record rainfall Hurricane Harvey dumped on the Houston area in August.

Two new scientific studies find warmer temperatures caused by global warming likely increased the amount of rain that fell over the Gulf region during the storm by between 15 and 38 percent.

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Carlo Allegri/Reuters

The vote tally in yesterday's Alabama Senate election offers a snapshot of racial polarization in today's America. 

Nearly two-thirds of white women voted for GOP contender Roy Moore, the candidate backed by President Donald Trump. At the same time, 98 percent of black women cast their ballots for Democratic candidate Doug Jones. 

The difference for men was almost as stark: About 93 percent of black men supported Jones, compared to 26 percent of white men. 

For the last 35 years, movie theaters have been banned in Saudi Arabia. That changed on Monday when Saudi Arabia announced it would allow cinemas to open as early as March.

It's the latest gesture towards modernization by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, who is also behind measures to permit women to drive and to bring back concerts.

When Saudi director Haifaa al-Mansour heard the news, she excitedly took to Twitter:

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Mark Makela/Reuters

Akayed Ullah, 27, is accused of setting off a pipe bomb in New York City on Monday, injuring five people, including himself.

He came to the US from Bangladesh in 2011 on a visa for relatives of a US citizen.

Related: Investigators search for clues in attempted New York subway bombing

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