Spotlight

Monday, 9:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m. on KUOW

Spotlight brings you compelling radio documentaries, riveting stories and genre-breaking radio shows.

Flickr Photo/Stuart Anthony

Charles Dickens’ story “A Christmas Carol” is a holiday favorite. It was performed earlier this month in front of a live audience at Seattle’s Center for Spiritual Living under the title “The Enlightened Message of Scrooge.”

This show will air on KUOW December 23 at 9:00 p.m.

KUOW Photo/Bond Huberman

Nancy Pearl joined host Steve Scher with a shelf full of suggestions for readers young and old with holiday gift-giving in mind. Listeners added their picks too in this live-call in special.

Nancy Pearl's Best Books Of 2013

Fiction

“The Woman Who Lost Her Soul,” Bob Shacochis

“Americanah,” Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

Non-Fiction

“Five Days At Memorial,” Sherry Fink

“Lawrence In Arabia,” Scott Anderson

KUOW Photo/Ashley Ahearn

Our one hour special, The Big Reset, explores how the Puget Sound region has emerged from the Great Recession.

Nancy Pearl On The Best Books Of The Summer

Sep 2, 2013
Nancy Pearl
KUOW Photo

What was the best book you read this summer? Book commentator Nancy Pearl joins us with her picks, and we want to hear yours, too.

Immigration And The Global Talent Search

May 10, 2013

Coming up on Spotlight, May 13 at 8:00 p.m.

It's the American dream: move to the United States, start your own business, build a successful life. But has the United States lost its edge in attracting the best and brightest entrepreneurs?

In this month's America Abroad, we'll learn about the significant role immigrants play in creating small and mid-sized businesses. We'll hear how the American visa process could be deterring potential entrepreneurs, particularly from math and engineering-focused places like India. And we'll learn what other countries are doing to attract foreign talent and help themselves out of the global recession.

Fear Tactics: A History Of Domestic Terrorism

Apr 29, 2013

Coming up on Spotlight on Monday, April 29 at 8:00 p.m.

On September 16, 1920, a bomb exploded on Wall Street as workers took their lunch break. The explosion killed 38 people and injured hundreds. The targets? What today we’d call “the one percent” — powerful financiers who ran J.P. Morgan & Co. The Wall Street attack remained the deadliest terrorist bombing in the US until Oklahoma City in 1995. But at the time, people saw it as just one more bombing in a long string of anarchist attacks that historian Beverly Gage calls America's “First Age of Terror.”

Gage and the American History Guys explore the origins of domestic terrorism in the United States and the question of what kinds of people and movements have been identified as “terrorist.” The program traces the relationship between “terror” and the state; considers lynching as a tactic of terrorism; and takes a look at a little known and unfinished Jack London novel, in which the author grapples with the question: When, if ever, is terrorism justified?

Mad Season
Courtesy/Wikipedia/Lance Mercer

Seattle's music scene was booming in the mid-1990s. Four friends from different established bands decided to get together for a side project called Mad Season. Layne Staley sang in Alice in Chains, Mike McCready played guitar for Pearl Jam, Bassist John Baker Saunders toured with The Walkabouts and Barrett Martin was the drummer for Screaming Trees. 

NPR Special: Iraq War

Mar 15, 2013
Flickr Photo/H Dragon

Coming up on Spotlight, March 18 at 8 p.m.

Ten years ago, a US-led invasion brushed aside Iraq's army and toppled the country’s long-time leader, Saddam Hussein.  The swift military operation quickly became a difficult and complicated occupation. The US found itself fighting an insurgency, and a sectarian conflict nearly consumed the country.

Scheduled for Spotlight at 8 p.m.

Over the summer of 2012, Iran doubled the number of nuclear centrifuges installed in its underground Fordow site despite increased international pressure and economic sanctions. Iran stopped just short of the capacity to produce nuclear fuel. Can Israel live with a nuclear Iran, or could the time be near for a pre-emptive strike? 

America Abroad
PRI

Scheduled for Spotlight on January 14 at 8:00 p.m.

Andrew Morrell / Flickr

Coming up on Spotlight, December 31 at 8:00 p.m.

In this hour of BackStory, we're all about the boozin'. Along the way, we ask when and why consumption and production has ebbed and flowed. We look at why rum became the drink of choice among revolutionary troops, why American Indians were rejecting alcohol two centuries before the rest of the country, and follow the long march toward Prohibition.

Originally produced a few years ago, this episode has been revised to include new segments and reflect fresh insight into the subject.

Pink Martini
Flickr illustration/Guillaume Laurent

Portland's Pink Martini released "Joy To The World" in November 2010. It's a collection of nondenominational holiday music from various countries. Among the traditional holiday tunes that we can all sing along to, the album features works in Chinese, Japanese, Hebrew, Spanish -- the list goes on. It's a joyful celebration of culture.

Tala v. Santa
Michael Clinard

New Hampshire Public Radio's Word of Mouth asks the serious holiday questions like is "Die Hard" a classic Christmas film? Also, they explore the science of giving and uncover the shocking history of Monopoly.

America Abroad
PRI

The assault on the American Consulate in Benghazi, Libya shocked the American public. African extremist groups like Ansar Dine, al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb, and Boko Haram threaten to further destabilize a fragile continent. America Abroad will take listeners to Mali, Nigeria, and Kenya's Swahili Coast to learn about these groups, the threat they present, and how African countries are — or aren't — combating them.

State Of The Re:Union
courtesy NPR and PRX

Jacksonville, Florida is a lot of things: a military town. A church town. A beach town. And it can be all those things because Jacksonville is the largest city in the whole country: 841 square miles of sprawl, highways and strip malls dotted with tiny, unique neighborhoods. How does a place this huge and diverse lurch forward to keep pace with the rest of the country? The quick answer: often, it doesn’t. But once in a while, in small surprising ways, this place can be an incubator for innovation. In host Al Letson’s hometown episode, State of the Re:Union asks: is Jacksonville is moving backward, stuck in neutral, or shifting towards progress?

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