The Record

Monday - Friday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Coming up on The Record, 7/29: a recommendation from book hugger Nancy Pearl, the story of Nell Pickerell, and the history of the Second Amendment

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 5 p.m. the day that they air.

Email: record@kuow.org

Sound of the Day: What interesting sound do you hear throughout the day? Record 30 seconds and send it to us, along with the story behind it. Email it to record@kuow.org with “Sound of the Day” in the subject line.

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International Community
11:00 am
Mon September 16, 2013

Reaction In The Middle East To Syria

The United Nations inspectors say they have convincing evidence that chemical weapons were used in a large scale attack in Syria last month. In a report released earlier today the inspectors said the samples they collected from an area of Damascus provided clear and convincing evidence that the nerve agent sarin was used.

The inspectors were not charged with determining who launched the chemical weapons. The news closely follows this weekend’s announcement that Russia and the United States had reached agreement on a framework for Syria to dismantle its chemical weapons program. The United States and its allies say military force is still a possibility if Syria fails to follow through on its agreement. Meanwhile the war in Syria continues.

Borzou Daragahi has been covering events in the Middle East for the Financial Times. He’s based in Cairo. He explains what the reaction in the Middle East has been to the announcement that Syria would give up its chemical weapons.

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Firefighting
10:48 am
Fri September 13, 2013

Fire Season Winding Down For Washington's Hotshots

Flickr Photo/US Department of Agriculture (CC-BY-NC-ND)

It's been a tough fire season for the elite group of firefighters known as hotshots; and not because of the fires.

Hotshots are used to the hard work. They work 14 days in a row, then get three days off, then repeat the cycle over and over again until winter finally puts the nation's fires to bed. They're deployed throughout the West, never knowing where they'll be sent until the last minute. They work with their hands, using chainsaws and shovels. Sometimes, they have to work through grief, as they did this summer when a fire near Phoenix, Arizona, swallowed 19 hotshots in one gulp.

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Soccer Standings
5:14 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

The Seattle Sounders Face Real Salt Lake

Flickr Photo/tiff_seattle

Once again, the entire stadium at Century Link Field will be open for Seattle Sounders FC fans this Friday. The Sounders are hoping to unseat the current top team in the Western Conference: Real Salt Lake.

Forwards Eddie Johnson and Clint Dempsey will return to Seattle fresh off of their US National Team game against Mexico in World Cup qualifying. Steve Clare, editor of Prost Amerika Soccer,  joins us to explain all that is at stake on Friday and beyond.

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Author Interview
4:14 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Author Danny Bland's On Writing His First Novel "In Case We Die"

Danny Bland's book "In Case We Die."

Twenty years ago, Danny Bland was a Seattle musician, porn shop clerk and heroin addict. These days, Bland is clean and sober. He road manages rock bands and writes in his free time. Bland's first novel, "In Case We Die" follows protagonist Charlie Hyatt, a character modeled on Bland's own life. Hyatt works the graveyard shift at a downtown porn emporium and spends his money on his next drug fix. Marcie Sillman talks with Danny Bland on what it was like to revisit his past through fiction.

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Recruitment & Funding Plans
3:58 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

State Leaders Say More UW Funding Key To Economic Growth

Suzzalo Library in the heart of the UW's Seattle campus.
Flickr Photo/Herr Hans Gruber

A group of business and civic leaders including Bill Gates Sr. have issued a report calling for the University of Washington to admit more in-state students. They also say the UW needs to recruit more leading academics.

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Religious Freedom
12:11 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Proposed Bill Would Enhance Religous Freedom Protections

State Senator Mike Padden.

Are Washingtonians forced by state government to act against their religious beliefs?

Last year, a Richland florist refused to provide flowers for a gay customer’s wedding. As a result, that florist is currently being sued by the state of Washington. When some Washington pharmacists felt they shouldn’t have to provide the morning-after pill to customers, the state pharmacy board jumped in. 

Now, Spokane Valley state Senator Mike Padden is drawing up a bill that would limit the state from compelling citizens to act against their religious beliefs. The senator talked with Ross Reynolds.

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Job Skills
12:00 pm
Thu September 12, 2013

Even With Google Translate, Language Skills Still Valuable

Michael Erard's book "Babel No More."

It might seem that tools like Google Translate make the ability to speak different languages less valuable to employers. But Michael Erard, author of “Babel No More: The Search for the World’s Most Extraordinary Language Learners,” says that being bilingual or multilingual is still important.

All kinds of organizations from Starbucks to the World Health Organization seek out people who are proficient in multiple languages.  Erard calls them the "staff hyperpolyglot." Marcie Sillman talks with Erard about multilingualism in the workplace.

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Director Interview
11:50 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Lynn Shelton's New Film "Touchy Feely"

Rosemary DeWitt in director Lynn Shelton's newest film "Touchy Feely."
From the "Touchy Feely" Facebook page.

Seattle cinephiles have known about director Lynn Shelton for years, starting with her 2004 film, "We Go Way Back" to her 2009 hit, "Humpday." Shelton's newest film, "Touchy Feely" is, at its heart, a story about love.  And "Touchy Feely" is once again deeply entrenched in Shelton's home the Northwest. Marcie Sillman talks with the filmmaker about her latest project.

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Inequality
11:48 am
Thu September 12, 2013

The Rising Income Gap: Is It All That Bad?

The rich are indeed getting richer. An updated study from UC-Berkeley finds that the income gap between the country's top 1 percent and the bottom 99 percent is the highest level recorded since the government started collecting that data nearly 100 years ago.

 

Some argue that more wealth in the world means a bigger slice of the economic pie for everyone. Others say the growing income gap means even less economic gains for the poor. Ross Reynolds talks with two economists, Dean Baker, founder of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, and Ben Powell, director of the Free Market Institute at Texas Tech University for two perspectives. 

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Math and Parenting
11:11 am
Thu September 12, 2013

Almost Everyone Can Master Algebra In 90 Minutes By Playing This Video Game

DragonBox Adaptive, a game developed by the UW Center for Game Science.
Credit UW Center for Game Science

Master Algebra in 90 Minutes: KUOW's Ross Reynolds interviews Zoran Popović from the UW Center for Game Design

The University of Washington's Center for Game Science has an outrageous claim: By playing a computer game called DragonBox Adaptive for 90 minutes, 92 percent of first graders can master algebraic linear equations.

But that's not just an untested claim — it's the result of tests done in Washington state's public schools. Amazingly, that statistic also held for the few kindergarten classes that have tested the game. Most school districts don't introduce this material until middle school. Today, Ross Reynolds speaks with the Center for Game Science's director, Zoran Popović.

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Seattle Sex Store Anniversary
5:04 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Twenty Years Of Babeland

Babeland is known for creative store window displays.
Flickr Photo/joaquin uy

In 1993 Seattle was famous for Nirvana, the internet and Tom Hanks' insomnia. But two woman decided that the city was missing something, something they believed there was a need and market for — the city's first women-friendly sex shop. Co-owners Claire Cavanah and Rachel Venning launched Babeland (originally Toys in Babeland) 20 years ago this month and Cavanah spoke with Ross Reynolds about the many ways the industry of selling 'sexcessories' has changed. 

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Child Abuse Case
4:31 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

What's Next For The Convicted Parents of Hana Williams?

Sentencing begins soon for Carri and Larry Williams. They were convicted of several charges this week in the death of their 13-year-old adopted daughter Hana Williams.

In May 2011, the Ethiopian teenager died in her own backyard from hypothermia. Her autopsy also found that malnutrition was a contributing factor.

This week, her adopted parents were both convicted of first-degree manslaughter. Carri Williams was convicted of the most serious charge: homicide by abuse. Larry Williams was not. On that charge, the judge declared a mistrial.

Many questions involving a possible retrial, appeals, and sentencing remain unanswered. Rich Weyrich is the prosecuting attorney for Skagit County. He talked with Ross Reynolds. Cassie Trueblood served as defense attorney for Larry Williams. She talked with Marcie Sillman.

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Artificial Intelligence
3:52 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

UW Professor Oren Etzioni To Lead Paul Allen's New Artificial Intelligence Institute

University of Washington computer science professor Oren Etzioni will lead a new institute on artificial intelligence founded by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen. Etzioni designed the technologies behind startup companies Netbot and Farecast. He talks with Ross Reynolds about what he could do working for Allen that he couldn’t do at the University of Washington.

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Canada's Reaction To Obama
3:27 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

The News From Canada: Shifting Toward Diplomacy In Syria

Flickr photo/Muhammad Ghafari

President Obama used a White House address on Tuesday night to delay a vote on military action against Syria in favor of a possible diplomatic solution. So far the Canadian government has lent moral support to the President’s cause, but no more. Vancouver Sun columnist Vaughn Palmer talks with Marcie Sillman about the Canadian reaction to the President's speech.

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Syria Stockpile
1:59 pm
Wed September 11, 2013

Dismantling Chemical Weapons In Umatilla, Ore.

The international community may soon be charged with the destruction of the Syrian government’s chemical weapons stockpile. After the US and Russia, Syria is assumed to have the world’s third largest stock of sarin, mustard gas and other toxic weapons.

The US began the process of destroying its chemical weapons in the 1990s, after it signed the International Chemical Weapons Treaty. Umatilla, Ore., was once home to one of the nine US Army installations that house chemical weapons. Umatilla staff successfully finished the process of dismantling that weapons stockpile in October of 2011.

Our Richland correspondent Anna King explains how they went about the process of destroying chemical weapons.

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