The Record

Monday - Friday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 5 p.m. the day that they air.

Sound of the Day: What interesting sound do you hear throughout the day? Record 30 seconds and send it to us, along with the story behind it. Email it to record@kuow.org with “Sound of the Day” in the subject line.

Tim Harford's book "The Undercover Economist Strikes Back"

Ross Reynolds talks with Tim Harford, Financial Times columnist and author, about his new book "The Undercover Economist Strikes Back: How to Run – or Ruin – an Economy." 

The book focuses on the work of macroeconomists and how they believe that tweaking the right dials can steer our economy away from danger. Harford also offers a macroeconomic perspective for Seattle's on-going minimum wage debate.

Vladimir Putin: Madman Or A Mastermind?

Mar 5, 2014
Masha Gessen's book "The Man Without a Face."

Steve Scher talks with Masha Gessen, author of The Man Without a Face: The Unlikely Rise of Vladimir Putin, about the Russian president's erratic behavior during the Ukrainian conflict.

Quixote Village: More Than Just A Place To Sleep

Mar 5, 2014
KUOW Photo/Elizabeth Jenkins

This past Christmas Eve, 30 homeless adults found a permanent residence in Olympia, Wash.

Before the move, the group lived in tents, hosted by different churches in the area. Many of the people had been sleeping in the woods and just wanted a safe place to stay.

Now, Camp Quixote is known as Quixote Village and comprises tiny houses for homeless adults. At 144 square feet, the homes are about the size of a one-car garage.

Why Everyone Wants A Piece Of Crimea

Mar 4, 2014
Flickr Photo/Christiaan Triebert (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Scott Radnitz, about how Crimea's history has influenced the current crisis in Ukraine. Radnitz is an associate professor in the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies at the University of Washington.

AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

David Hyde talks with Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of Drug Policy Alliance, about how he thinks the national debate has changed after Washington legalized marijuana and what he sees as the future of crime and drugs.

Neanderthal Man: How All Humans Are Africans

Mar 4, 2014
Svante Pääbo's book "Neanderthal Man."

David Hyde talks with author Svante Pääbo about his book "Neanderthal Man: In Search of Lost Genomes" and what it means to be part-Neanderthal.

Flickr Photo/greggavedon.com (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with freelance journalist Michael Schulson about his Daily Beast article, "Whole Foods: America's Temple of Pseudoscience."

Flickr Photo/Eva Funderburgh (CC BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde talks with Ryan Lothrop, recreational fishery manager at the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, about forecasting salmon runs for the 2014-15 fishing season.

Lothrop said about 283,000 Chinook and 870,000 coho salmon are expected to return to Puget Sound this year.

When Actors Were The Anchors

Mar 4, 2014
YouTube

Modern moviegoers are used to experiencing trailers, concession advertisements and, of course, a reminder to turn off their cell phone before the main attraction hits the screen.

But it wasn’t always that way. Until the 1950s, you got a good dose of news before you escaped into a Hollywood fantasyland. Beginning in 1935, “The March of Time” started replacing silent news reels in movie theaters, and it was a welcome change.

Flickr Photo/AdamFagen (CC BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Hanni Fakhoury, attorney for the Electronic Frontier Foundation, about the recent Washington Supreme Court ruling on privacy rights. The Court found that text messages are considered private, and police need a warrant before they read them.

Susan Beilby Magee's book "Into The Light."

Marcie Sillman talks with Susan Beilby Magee about her book "Into The Light."

The book is about the emotional and artistic journey of artist Kalman Aron. He's painted portraits of everyone from Ronald Reagan to André Previn. He is also a survivor of the Holocaust, and he tells his story and shares his art with Magee.      

Copyright (c) 2012 by Ellen Forney. Reprinted by arrangement with Gotham Books, a member of Penguin Group (USA), Inc.

When Ellen Forney was diagnosed with bipolar disorder 16 years ago, her first concern was for her creative future. The award-winning cartoonist prided herself on the artwork and stories she'd come up with during periods she described as manic. Right after her diagnosis, Forney was reluctant to try the drug treatments her psychiatrist prescribed for her. Would she lose her creative edge on lithium? But after a serious period of depression, Forney set out on the ongoing journey to achieve and maintain a state of mental balance.

Post-Chavez Venezuela: A Political House Of Mirrors

Mar 3, 2014
AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd

Steve Scher talks with Jose Antonio Lucero, chair of Latin American and Caribbean Studies at the University of Washington, about the protests in Venezuela.

Flickr Photo/albedo20 (CC BY-NC-ND)

Steve Scher talks with journalist Caitlin Flanagan about her Atlantic Magazine cover story, "The Dark Power of Fraternities."

Flanagan said the fraternity industry is the largest provider of alcohol to underage drinkers in the United States outside of family members.

Armatix handout

David Hyde talks with Professor Stephen Teret from John's Hopkins Center for Gun Policy and Research about the new smart guns hitting the market.

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