The Record

Monday - Friday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 5 p.m. the day that they air.

Sound of the Day: What interesting sound do you hear throughout the day? Record 30 seconds and send it to us, along with the story behind it. Email it to record@kuow.org with “Sound of the Day” in the subject line.

Ways To Connect

Rev. Carey G. Anderson speaks during the First African Methodist Episcopal Church’s 125th year anniversary service Sunday, Nov. 20, 2011 in Seattle.
Courtesy Seattle Times/Erika Schultz / The Seattle Times

The first call Rev. Carey G. Anderson received following the mass shooting at Emanuel A.M.E. Church in Charleston last week came from Seattle’s police chief.

“Chief O’Toole called me to express her condolence and concern and to let me know, and the black church at large, that SPD is standing available in any way and any capacity,” said Anderson, the pastor at the First A.M.E. Church in Seattle. 

KUOW Photo/Mike Kane

Holly Connor of Mercer Island started learning to read and write Braille in preschool.

Now 10, she’s one of North America’s fastest readers and writers in her age group – when it comes to Braille.

University of Washington

Ross Reynolds speaks with Crystal Eney, Director of Student Services at the University of Washington's Department of Computer Science and Engineering, about how their department achieved a rate of female enrollment that's nearly double the national average. They have been recognized for their achievements with an award from the National Center for Women and Information Technology.

Members with the U.S. Forest Service's Lassen Interagency Hotshot crew stationed at Susanville, Calif., observe an Alaska Army National Guard UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter approach a landing zone June 30, 2013, over Palmer, Alaska.
Flickr Photo/U.S. Department of Defense (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman talks with Alaska Public Radio reporter Alexandra Guttierez about the challenges of fighting fires in Alaska.

Jeannie Yandel talks with Anastasia Podlazova, the founder of DroWa, an annual festival for the Russian-speaking community in Washington, about how the Ukrainian conflict impacts the event.

Jeannie Yandel speaks with Alicia Walters, director of the Oakland-based organization Echoing Ida, about how the story of Rachel Dolezal prompted her to go public with her own experience growing up black in Spokane, and what the Dolezal event tells her about race and racism in the United States.

Ta Kwe Say, 23, says this drawing in the book 'Forced to Flee' depicts how Burmese army recruits are programmed to choose violence over justice.
Courtesy of Erika Berg

What would you do if you were forced to leave your country and couldn't go home? For refugees in Washington state, that's more than a hypothetical question.

King County Heroin Deaths Up 58 Percent In 2014

Jun 18, 2015
Found in Seattle's Belltown area in 2008.
Flickr photo/Elan Ruskin (CC BY-NC 2.0)

A spike in deaths from heroin use in King County has alarmed health experts and prompted warnings that the trend will continue unless efforts to treat addiction are ramped up.

The report on drug trends from the University of Washington's Alcohol and Drug Abuse Institute says 156 people died with heroin in their systems in 2014, a 58 percent increase over the year before.

Playground and wading pool at Woodland Park, circa 1915.
Flickr Photo/Seattle Municipal Archives (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds speaks with Jesus Aguirre, the new superintendent of Seattle Parks and Recreation, about why his background in education matters and about his vision for how Seattleites of the future will play.

broadband router internet
Flickr Photo/Tom Page (CC BY 2.0)

Ross Reynolds interviews Christopher Mitchell about what steps Seattle might take to provide affordable broadband internet for all. Mitchell is the director of the Community Broadband Networks Initiative for the Institute for Local Self-Reliance.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Peter Lape, curator of archaeology at the Burke Museum, about the significance of recently revealed DNA tests on the Kennewick Man. The tests strongly indicate that the prehistoric male who roamed the Columbia River Basin 9,000 years ago is a distant ancestor of the modern-day Colville Tribe.

Seattle Playwright Yussef El Guindi.
Courtesy ACT Theatre

Seattle-based playwright Yussef El Guindi was born in Egypt. But he feels more at ease in his adopted home.

"Egypt is always going to a part of my background, my heritage," he says. "But I've been here 30 years now. I definitely consider myself American."

Burn Ban Marks Start Of Rough Fire Season

Jun 17, 2015

Marcie Sillman speaks with Peter Goldmark, commissioner of public lands for the state Department of Natural Resources, about a burn ban in effect in eastern Washington and the coming wildfire season.

Marcie Sillman speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about newly legalized edible products for medical marijuana users and botched plans for international yoga day.

A crow dives on a researcher during a trial. Crows recognize people who have scared them or wronged them for years.
Courtesy Keith Brust

Professor John Marzluff’s phone is ringing more than usual, which means it’s crow dive-bombing season in Seattle.

“Every time I go out into my backyard there's a crow out there that's squawking at me and chasing me down,” said a man who called in about his experience to KUOW.

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