The Record

Monday - Friday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 5 p.m. the day that they air.

Sound of the Day: What interesting sound do you hear throughout the day? Record 30 seconds and send it to us, along with the story behind it. Email it to record@kuow.org with “Sound of the Day” in the subject line.

Ways To Connect

Megan Rapinoe is seen in action in 2012.
Flickr photo/kimphotography (CC BY 2.0)

Marcie Sillman talked to Megan Rapinoe, midfielder for the Seattle Reign FC and the U.S. Women's National Team in 2013 about her career and the future of soccer in the United States. The women's team opens play in the World Cup in Canada on Monday.

The giant Pacific octopus can change colors when disturbed or excited.
Courtesy of Janna Nichols

Imagine for a moment a sentient being that’s radically unlike a human: No bones, numerous limbs that can “taste” you, a slimy body that can squirt through small holes, a mysterious intelligence. This is not science fiction. This is the giant Pacific octopus, one of the many secrets of Puget Sound.

Writer Sy Montgomery made it a personal goal to get as close as she could to one of these large cephalopods for a new book, "The Soul Of An Octopus."

business board room
Flickr Photo/Eric Dan (CC-BY-NC-ND)

More men named John, Robert, William or James run the boards of America’s largest companies than women do.

And in the Pacific Northwest, the numbers are worse than the national average.

Students from Seattle Pacific University gather in a prayer circle after the shooting on June 5, 2014.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

A year ago today, student Chris Howard was in Seattle Pacific University’s engineering building when his friend Thomas Fowler ran in.

Fowler was injured, but Howard didn’t initially realize what had happened: A gunman had opened fire on campus.

Howard told KUOW's Jeannie Yandel what happened next and how he has come to terms with the shooting in his senior year at SPU.

The state of Alaska has sent thousands of pink slips to its workers. The ripple effects could affect the fishing industry.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Marcie Sillman talks to Alexandra Gutierrez of Alaska Public Radio about the budget standstill in Alaska's Legislature and how a government shutdown will affect the lives of Alaskans. 

Pacific Northwest Ballet principal dancers Carla Korbes and Batkhurel Bold in George Balanchine's "Diamonds."
PNB/Angela Sterling

When Seattle ballerina Carla Korbes dons a white tutu in the classic ballet, “Swan Lake,” she can make you believe she’s a swan.

That uncanny ability has made Korbes a darling in the ballet world – so beloved that New York Times chief dance critic Alastair Macaulay regularly flies out to see her perform. He calls her one of the world’s greatest ballerinas today because of how she feels the music and embodies the characters.

Officer Timothy Brenton's brother and stepmother embrace at the King County Courthouse following the guilty verdict of Christopher Monfort. Monfort was found guilty of mudering Brenton while he was sitting in his patrol car in 2009.
KUOW Photo/Amy Radil

A man who shot and killed a Seattle police officer as he sat in a patrol car was found guilty of first-degree murder on Friday.

A King County jury rejected defendant Christopher Monfort’s insanity plea in the 2009 murder of officer Timothy Brenton.

An example of Seattle's Pollinator Pathway.
Pollinatorpathway.com

Sarah Bergmann was working at a New York ad agency when she heard about the decline in honeybee populations. The agency was working on a campaign to raise awareness of the honeybee, Bergmann says.

"The more I read, the more I realized the honeybee is actually a symptom," she says.

PNB soloist Kiyon Gaines in Twyla Tharp's "Waiting at the Station."
Courtesy PNB/Angela Sterling

Pacific Northwest Ballet soloist Kiyon Gaines says he didn’t find ballet -- ballet found him.

The Baltimore native didn’t start dancing until he was 10. He studied tap and jazz. Somebody told him that ballet lessons would help him with how he carried his arms. So his mother enrolled him in a local class.

Marcie Sillman talks to Jake Beattie, executive director of the Northwest Maritime Center in Port Townsend, about the Race to Alaska, in which contestants row, paddle or sail 750 miles to Ketchikan, Alaska. 

Bartell Drugs is marketing a local label.
KUOW Photo/Gil Aegerter

Kim Malcolm talks with University of Washington marketing professor Nidhi Agrawal about Bartell Drugs' effort to create a local, private label.

A gray wolf trots along a road in Washington state.
Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (CC BY 2.0)

Marcie Sillman talks with the executive director of the Human-Wildlife Conflict Collaboration, Francine Madden, about the underlying tensions in Washington's battle over wolf management. 

BC Place in Vancouver will host many of the Women's World Cup games, including the final on July 5.
Flickr Photo/BC Gov Photos (CC-BY-NC-ND)

Marcie Sillman speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the FIFA Women's World Cup, which begins in Canada on Saturday, June 6.

Folio: The Seattle Athenaeum will be housed at the downtown YMCA building, just a block away from the central library.
Flickr Photo/stevekeiretsu (CC-BY-NC-ND)

David Hyde asks Crosscut editor-at-large David Brewster why he plans to bring a subscription library called Folio: The Athenaeum to Seattle. 

Two FBI Surveillance Flights Passed Over Seattle In May

Jun 3, 2015

Ross Reynolds speaks with Associated Press reporter Eileen Sullivan about the FBI surveillance program which sent planes over Seattle and other U.S. cities.

Also, Kim Malcolm speaks with Jay Stanley, a senior policy analyst with the American Civil Liberties Union, about the wider debate about privacy versus security.

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