The Record

Monday - Friday, noon - 1:00 p.m. on KUOW

Most show segments are available online and as podcasts by 5 p.m. the day that they air.

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Ways To Connect

Emily McCann took this Whittier Elementary on the first day of the strike.
Courtesy of Emily McCann

David Hyde talks to Phil Dine, labor expert and author of "State of the Unions," about how Seattle's teacher strike compares to labor trends nationally.

David Hyde talks to Jerry Cornfield, legislative reporter for the Everett Daily Herald, about the role of state funding in Seattle's teacher strike. Last month, Washington State's Supreme Court held lawmakers in contempt for failing to fully fund public education.

Male human head louse
Flickr Photo/Gilles San Martin (CC BY SA 2.0)

When kids in Seattle eventually go to school after the strike, they could find an unfriendly welcoming party: tougher lice.

Washington is among at least 25 states where lice have become highly resistant to conventional treatments, according to a recent study.

The good news: Lice aren’t really much of a health problem and schools are being urged not to ban kids from class just because of a stray nit (the louse’s egg). But there’s still that feeling you get when you talk about them …

The Gates Foundation's headquarters near Seattle Center.
Flickr Photo/ganphotography (CC BY NC ND 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel talks to former Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn about why he is calling on the Gates Foundation to divest from fossil fuel companies. 

Two cookie varieties produced by Jody Hall's new venture, The Goodship Company.
Facebook Photo/The Goodship Company

Jeannie Yandel sits down with Cupcake Royale founder Jody Hall to talk about her new venture, The Goodship Company, which produces edible marijuana products. Hall explains why she got into the pot industry and how she hopes to change the culture of marijuana. 

David Hyde speaks with Vaughn Palmer, columnist for the Vancouver Sun, about the beleaguered governing party in Canada and the issues they're facing in the run up to the October elections.

Holly Smith, Holly's son Oliver, and farmer Bill Davidson at the Ballard Farmers' Market.
KUOW Photo/Jeannie Yandel

Jeannie Yandel talks with Cafe Juanita chef Holly Smith about shopping for fresh nectarines at the Ballard Farmers Market. 

Ross Reynolds interviews Bainbridge Island writer Jonathan Evison about his fourth novel, “This Is Your Life, Harriet Chance!," which centers around a mysterious phone call about an Alaska cruise made to a 79-year-old woman. Evison also talks about the influence of fellow Northwest novelist Maria Semple on his work and what it’s like to have Paul Rudd play him in the upcoming film based on his last book, “The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving."

Mount Baker glacier as seen from a helicopter in 2009.
Flickr Photo/judy_and_ed (CC BY NC 2.0)

Jeannie Yandel talks with Seattle Times science reporter Sandi Doughton about her story on the alarming melting of Northwest glaciers due to hot weather and low snowpack. Scientists say glaciers across the North Cascades could shrink by as much as 10 percent this year.

Jason Schmidt and his dad around 1976 at their house on Hayes Street in Eugene, Oregon.
Courtesy of Jason Schmidt

Marcie Sillman gets the week's reading recommendation from librarian Nancy Pearl: "A List of Things That Didn't Kill Me," by Seattleite Jason Schmidt. Pearl says there's usually too much "me" in memoirs, but this one defied her expectations in a good way. 

Read an excerpt from Schmidt's book as part of KUOW's Seattle Stories Project: "I Couldn't Save My Dad From AIDS, So I Saved Myself Instead."

As Smoke Clears, Twisp Hotel Welcomes Back Tourists

Sep 4, 2015
A wildfire burns behind a home on Twisp River Road early Thursday, Aug. 20, 2015 in Twisp, Wash.
AP Photo/Ted S. Warren

Marcie Sillman talks to Joe Marver, owner of the Twisp River Suites hotel, about how business is doing in the wake of this summer's devastating fire season. 

The view from Harbor West condominium in West Seattle.
Courtesy of Finn Raftery

A new study says beautiful places like King County have so many people who claim to be nones -- having no religion -- because the natural world provides a "spiritual resource." Ross Reynolds speaks with Todd Ferguson, co-author with Jeffrey Tamborello, about their finding that counties with high levels of natural amenities also have low rates of religious adherence

Mosquito fleet steamers are seen at Houghton, Wash., in 1945.
Courtesy of MOHAI

Jeannie Yandel speaks to Leonard Garfield, director of the Museum of History and Industry, about a time when Seattleites got around on a "swarm of little steamers" known as the Mosquito Fleet.

Firefighters line up to get gear out of the back of a fire truck as they get ready to head for a fire Thursday, Aug. 20, 2015, in Twisp, Wash.
AP Photo/Elaine Thompson

Todd Mundt speaks with Richard Harvey, a volunteer firefighter working on the Okanogan complex fires. After the "hot, dirty work" on the fire line that gets all the attention, he says,“Mop up is the dirty part that they don’t show on the television.”

Flickr Photo/La Piazza Pizzeria (CC BY-NC-ND)

Ross Reynolds interviews Sarah Schacht, who has survived two bouts of E.coli, about her grassroots effort to make restaurant inspection results more public in King County.